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Author Topic:   I'm using console mode!
MacManKrisK
Super Geek

Posts: 216
From: Southwest Lower Michigan, USA
Registered: Oct 2001

posted May 10, 2002 12:41     Click Here to See the Profile for MacManKrisK   Click Here to Email MacManKrisK     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Wow, I never thought this would ever happen! I, the MacMan, am actually voluntarally using a command line interface! I decided that I if I wanted to be able to really fix Mac OS X, I'd need to learn how to really use the Unix Underpinninings of Mac OS X. (Click on the link, it's funny!)
I learned the OS X ">console" log in trick last night and I'm amazed at how freakin' fast my machine is when I turn off all that gooey-aqua stuff! Lynx kicks the crap out of Mozilla when it comes to speed but it blows IE right out of the water!
Oh, right, if you don't know the >console trick, it's easy, just enter ">console" (without the quotes) at the login screen and you will be magically zapped to the land of no graphics. Very.......different, indeed!
So, are there any BSD geeks out there that can give me any tips on what to do now that I'm in the console? Any hacks I can do? What programs should I download? Oh yeah, most importantly, HOW TO I COMPILE STUFF?!
Gee, now, what was the point of this post again? Oh well, points are for losers!

------------------
KK (a.k.a. The MacMan)
Now with more tidbity goodness!

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MacManKrisK
Super Geek

Posts: 216
From: Southwest Lower Michigan, USA
Registered: Oct 2001

posted May 10, 2002 14:31     Click Here to See the Profile for MacManKrisK   Click Here to Email MacManKrisK     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Oh yeah, I forgot to mention one more thing, is there an AIM client I can get for the command line??

------------------
KK (a.k.a. The MacMan)
Now with more tidbity goodness!

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dragonman97
Alpha Geek

Posts: 280
From: Westchester County, New York
Registered: May 2001

posted May 10, 2002 17:06     Click Here to See the Profile for dragonman97   Click Here to Email dragonman97     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by MacManKrisK:
[...] Oh yeah, most importantly, HOW TO I COMPILE STUFF?!



Congratulations for taking the first step.
The most common way to compile programs, distributed as source in .tar.gz (tarballs) is:
tar xvzf thefilename.tar.gz
cd thenewdirectory
./configure
make
su [switch to root - type password]
make install

I don't know if this varies much under OS X - I imagine it shouldn't, but I do know you have to enable the root account.

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MacManKrisK
Super Geek

Posts: 216
From: Southwest Lower Michigan, USA
Registered: Oct 2001

posted May 10, 2002 22:52     Click Here to See the Profile for MacManKrisK   Click Here to Email MacManKrisK     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thanks! Hmm...looks like I need to get the DEVTools CD again! (I had the Developer Toos before, but I fscked up my hard drive [quite literally, it was fsck that broke it] and since reinstalling, I have lost the images.) I never knew how to use make before, my Linux geek friends would always start to tell me how and then somehow we'd forget what we were talking about. As for enabling the root user, it's one of the first things I do after installing OS X (then I can edit the motd!).

------------------
KK (a.k.a. The MacMan)
Now with more tidbity goodness!

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RedHatDude
Geek Larva

Posts: 21
From: Rochester, NY, USA
Registered: Apr 2002

posted May 12, 2002 12:01     Click Here to See the Profile for RedHatDude   Click Here to Email RedHatDude     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I don't know about OS X (should know about it soon enough though ), but a good place to look for software is http://www.freshmeat.net

There's a lot of good stuff on there, and a good portion of it should be cross platform.

I've personally used console AIM programs, but don't know if they would work on OS X.

As for tips on software.... I'm sure you've heard of it, but in case you haven't, Emacs (http://www.gnu.org/software/emacs) is an AWESOME editor (mail reader, web browser, tetris implementation, coffee maker )

As for the standard tools, learn to use grep, regular expressions, and shell loops (install Bash if it isn't installed). It can make a lot of tasks easier.

For example, lets say you got a bunch of files from a windows user, and the caps on the files are all mixed up in seemingly random ways, you could write this simple loop to convert them all to lowercase:

for i in *; do
mv $i `echo $i | tr [:upper:] [:lower:]`;
done

(of course, this won't work if some of the files have spaces in their names, in that case you'd have to change your field separator (the character that the loop uses to separate each iterator, and by default it's a space, but you could make it a newline (export IFS="<newline>" where <newline> is an actual newline)))

All of this becomes more natuaral the more you use the CLI, but it has many more uses than renaming files, I use a similar loop to resize, scale, and rotate pictures (I sell a lot of stuff on ebay, and though I like the 1200x960 (whatever) pictures my digital camera takes, people seeing our auctions wouldn't like it too much

For manipulating images with the command line, see "convert" and "nconvert". nconvert is a program I found on freshmeat I think, and convert is from ImageMagick.

Have fun, and may the source be with you (cheesy, I know )

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RedHatDude
Geek Larva

Posts: 21
From: Rochester, NY, USA
Registered: Apr 2002

posted May 12, 2002 12:10     Click Here to See the Profile for RedHatDude   Click Here to Email RedHatDude     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Oh, I almost forgot to mention, links is a better web browser than lynx for a lot of stuff (it lacks some features), as it supports tables and frames, you can get it on Freshmeat

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TheAnnoyedCockroach
Assimilated

Posts: 470
From: Denial
Registered: Feb 2002

posted May 12, 2002 17:40     Click Here to See the Profile for TheAnnoyedCockroach   Click Here to Email TheAnnoyedCockroach     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Lucky you. I can't even get my computer to connect to the internet in Linux.

------------------
We are all here my friends, all dogged and spaced but oh so beautiful...

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MacManKrisK
Super Geek

Posts: 216
From: Southwest Lower Michigan, USA
Registered: Oct 2001

posted May 12, 2002 20:46     Click Here to See the Profile for MacManKrisK   Click Here to Email MacManKrisK     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by TheAnnoyedCockroach:
Lucky you. I can't even get my computer to connect to the internet in Linux.


That's one advantage to Mac OS X, I set everything up in the nice, pretty GUI and THEN I went over to the Console. I also don't use PPP from the terminal, I get online through a firewall so I just connect through eth0.

------------------
KK (a.k.a. The MacMan)
Now with more tidbity goodness!

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SupportGoddess
Highlie

Posts: 581
From: The Digital Temple
Registered: Jul 2001

posted May 12, 2002 21:02     Click Here to See the Profile for SupportGoddess   Click Here to Email SupportGoddess     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by TheAnnoyedCockroach:
Lucky you. I can't even get my computer to connect to the internet in Linux.


Why not?

------------------
"Programming is like sex: one mistake and you have to support it for the rest of your life."
-Michael Sinz

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greycat
Alpha Geek

Posts: 267
From:
Registered: Oct 2001

posted May 13, 2002 07:26     Click Here to See the Profile for greycat     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by RedHatDude:
For example, lets say you got a bunch of files from a windows user, and the caps on the files are all mixed up in seemingly random ways, you could write this simple loop to convert them all to lowercase:

for i in *; do
mv $i `echo $i | tr [:upper:] [:lower:]`;
done


Doesn't Red Hat have the "rename" command? It's a perl script, and in Debian it comes with the standard perl packages. Quoth the man page:

code:

To translate uppercase names to lower, you'd use

rename 'y/A-Z/a-z/' *


quote:
(of course, this won't work if some of the files have spaces in their names, in that case you'd have to change your field separator [...]

The rename script can handle that.

Remember, when the shell expands a wildcard, each argument is passed to the program separately, even if the argument contains internal spaces. So rename 's/ /_/g' *.mp3 will rename all MP3 files in the current directory, changing spaces to underscores. (If you care about such things. Personally, I like the spaces in the file names.)

The only time you have to worry about spaces in file names is when you're writing shell scripts. In general, you almost always need to enclose file name variables in double quotes, thus:

code:

find . -name '*.mp3' -print | while read f; do
something somethng "$f"
done

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RedHatDude
Geek Larva

Posts: 21
From: Rochester, NY, USA
Registered: Apr 2002

posted May 20, 2002 11:47     Click Here to See the Profile for RedHatDude   Click Here to Email RedHatDude     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Hmmm, I never knew about the rename script...

But the reason I mentioned changing the field sep. was that my example used a for loop, and that's required for for loops (you could use a while loop with the read command I suppose).

You're right about the quotes, you'd have to put double quotes around where the filenames would be substituted if you want to handle spaces.

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Stormtalon
Geek-in-Training

Posts: 39
From: Minnesota
Registered: Feb 2002

posted May 20, 2002 15:16     Click Here to See the Profile for Stormtalon     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by RedHatDude:
As for tips on software.... I'm sure you've heard of it, but in case you haven't, Emacs (http://www.gnu.org/software/emacs) is an AWESOME editor (mail reader, web browser, tetris implementation, coffee maker

(it just has to be done)

No, not Emacs! Use vi! It is the only true *NIX text editor!

(there, now I feel better)

Actually, I'm very text-editor agnostic, but the Emacs/vi war is just too good to NOT continue....


Stormtalon


------------------
Those who are easily offended should be.

And often.

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MacManKrisK
Super Geek

Posts: 216
From: Southwest Lower Michigan, USA
Registered: Oct 2001

posted May 20, 2002 23:09     Click Here to See the Profile for MacManKrisK   Click Here to Email MacManKrisK     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Stormtalon:
Actually, I'm very text-editor agnostic, but the Emacs/vi war is just too good to NOT continue....

Alright, I'm putting a stop to this RIGHT NOW! I used to be reasonably vim-savvy, but I havn't used UNIX systems at all since I left Michigan Tech over....2 years ago now; so I lost all I learned about vim (:q what?) Emacs is just silly too with the escape stuff and the "Meta" key and all that.... bah!

I shall end this war with one word: pico

------------------
KK (a.k.a. The MacMan)
Now with more tidbity goodness!

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uilleann
Geek Larva

Posts: 27
From: St Albans, Herts, England
Registered: Apr 2002

posted May 21, 2002 01:29     Click Here to See the Profile for uilleann   Click Here to Email uilleann     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Ooh, pico :)

I only really used *NIX apps during my second year of my course at university; I'm on work placement now, so it's Win32 and Mac OS for me now.

Anyhow, Emacs' C/Java auto-indenting is insufferable (OK, it's probably configurable somehow), so that ruled out Emacs altogether. For some reason I never tried vi; a friend and I did look at the X version of it, and we were in hysterics over the keyboard shortcuts (never seen anything so stupid in our lives!).

However, yes, pico's nice (I think, been a while since I used that, too). Also, the ash editor is a funny little thing :)

However, I'm all for BBEdit these days, offers format colour-coding like X Emacs without re-laying out all your work out of spite :)

- Uilleann

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RedHatDude
Geek Larva

Posts: 21
From: Rochester, NY, USA
Registered: Apr 2002

posted May 21, 2002 05:01     Click Here to See the Profile for RedHatDude   Click Here to Email RedHatDude     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Yeah, you gotta configure Emacs to lay out your code the way you want it laid out. Actually, I like Emac's ability to line up multi-line argument definition lists automatically.

My current favorite editor is jedit (http://www.jedit.org). It runs on all of the platforms that I use, and has a lot of nice features.

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greycat
Alpha Geek

Posts: 267
From:
Registered: Oct 2001

posted May 21, 2002 05:18     Click Here to See the Profile for greycat     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
For some reason I never tried vi; a friend and I did look at the X version of it, and we were in hysterics over the keyboard shortcuts (never seen anything so stupid in our lives!).

They won't seem so stupid the next time you find yourself using a dumb terminal that doesn't have arrow keys on it, connecting to a Unix host over a 1200 baud modem.

What's that you say? They got 2400 baud modems now? Well, dad-gum! I'm gonna have to git me an upgrade!

Seriously, vi is meant to run on anything. If your first exposure to Unix was the X window system, you're missing a lot of the historical basis for Unix and its quirks.

Actually, some people in modern years have been seduced to the Light Side because they use laptop computers that don't have numeric keypads. Then, when they try to play Angband or Nethack, they find themselves using the vi-like keyboard mapping (h,j,k,l for non-diagonal movement, etc.) instead of the keyboard mapping that's designed for three-handed people on keyboards with a numeric keypad. And from there, it's a slippery slope to using h,j,k,l instead of the arrow keys in vi. Then before they know it, they're hooked.

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uilleann
Geek Larva

Posts: 27
From: St Albans, Herts, England
Registered: Apr 2002

posted May 22, 2002 05:50     Click Here to See the Profile for uilleann   Click Here to Email uilleann     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
greycat
They won't seem so stupid the next time you find yourself using a dumb terminal that doesn't have arrow keys on it, connecting to a Unix host over a 1200 baud modem.
...
If your first exposure to Unix was the X window system, you're missing a lot of the historical basis for Unix and its quirks.
...
And from there, it's a slippery slope to using h,j,k,l instead of the arrow keys in vi.

Ah, that is to say, the X version of vi is consistent with the terminal version. Makes perfect sense, but still not something I'm after, although I am familiar with key combinations for movement.

In fact, on older Macs that lacked extended keyboards, home, end, page up and page down (scrolling, not cursor control) were achieved by four key combinations, ^A, ^D, ^K and ^L, or something very much like that. (Those still work even now, don't they? In Classic, at least).

Given that arrow keys are indeed available on my home machine, I think I'd just edit files in a more modern-styled terminal-mode editor (such as pico, or whatever I think of at the time) in a terminal window in X.

As for X vs terminal, I think I actually used Telnet before X-Windows, but not by much.

Oh, and game keys... I tended to stick with arrows when I used to play games on my 486, but games like Descent needed all sorts of other keys set up, and it got nasty :) X-Wing was almost as bad, but at least you couldn't strafe, so there was no concern about keyboard+mouse vs two-hands-on-keyboard nonsense.

Probably the worst I've seen is Acornsoft Aviator, which seemed to do something with every single key on the keyboard (albeit only a small BBC Micro keyboard) ("Memorise That!"). BBC games, though, did tend to not use the arrow keys, movement was usually Z,X,/,' or A,Z,",","." for four-way movement, Z,X or Caps Lock,Ctrl for sideways movement (plus other keys for thrust, fire etc. as needed) :) Fun fun, heh?

- Uilleann

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Erbo
Super Geek

Posts: 139
From: Denver, CO, US
Registered: Jan 2000

posted May 24, 2002 12:58     Click Here to See the Profile for Erbo   Click Here to Email Erbo     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Stormtalon:
the Emacs/vi war is just too good to NOT continue....

Why? I use both. Emacs under X for heavy-duty code editing, vi in a terminal window for just about any little task you just gotta have a text editor for right now (especially when ssh'd into a remote system!). And I frequently use "view" (the read-only variant of vi) for browsing through big text files where I know I've got to back up and move around a lot.

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