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Author Topic: The Engine is Out (again)
MacManKrisK

Gold Hearted SuperFan!
Member # 955

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Icon 1 posted June 08, 2008 17:43      Profile for MacManKrisK     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Sprocket and I both had Friday off from our respective places of employment, so we decided it was time to pull the engine out of my bus. I have a new clutch, new oil cooler, new compartment seal, and air control flaps and misc. bits and bobs to put on the engine.

It was quite a day, but is oddly not much of a story (at least until Sprocket posts the pics). I really /do/ love how simple this engine is to get out (comparably to a "normal" vehicle, anyway).

Step 1) Disconnect any hoses, fuel lines, and electrical connections that go between the engine and the body.

Step 2) Place a wide board (or plywood) on a couple of jacks, and raise the jacks and wood up to the engine and then a couple inches more.

Step 3) Remove the 4 bolts that hold the rear mounting bracket onto the frame.. then crawl underneith and remove the 4 bolts that hold the engine to the transmission. (Interesting fac: the older beetles didn't have the rear mounting bracket and the engine was attached to the car by only 4 nuts on the transmission!)

Step 4) Tug on the engine to unplug it from the transmission, lower the jacks, and roll it out from under the vehicle.

After we got it out, it was on the floor and we couldn't get it up onto the table I wanted to use to work on it (mostly because I'm a puny weakling). Saturday we went back and used a fun hydraulic device to lift the engine onto the table. That's where the pix come in, and I am pretty much out of story until Sprocket posts the pix. [Smile]

--------------------
"Buy low, sell high
get rich and you still die"


Posts: 2331 | From: Southwest Michigan, USA | Registered: Oct 2001  |  IP: Logged
Sprocket
Mini Geek
Member # 10210

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Icon 1 posted June 08, 2008 18:45      Profile for Sprocket   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Ok so that is MacManKrisK's project for the day.

My project was to improve some of the landscape around my church. So at about 7:30am i got up and headed into work to borrow a pickup truck. I then went to the local city compost yard to buy a yard of compost for some flower beds.

When i got that MMKK and I met at Abe's Coney Island for breakfast and then we headed out to my church.

We started by unloading about a 1/4 of the compost next to a main flower bed and the covering it and then proceeded to fill some small beds.

Then we had this compost left. And it was alot!! So I decided that we should try to plant grass in parts of the lawn that the grass had died. Well so we have this compost and we spread that and then we plant the seed.

We rigged my truck up with a 55 gallon drum that holds water and a hose to water the grass seed. But there wasnt enough pressure. well MMKK had to leave for church.

Once i dropped him off i went off to Harbor Freight, and there is where i found this:

A 12-V Pump with plenty of power!!!!!

I mounted it and it gives me great pressure, but there is only one thing!!!

The pump will pump 240 Gallons/Hr. (GPH)

240GPH ---> G/Min. = 4GPM

55 Gallons of H2O at 4GPM = less than 15 minutes of pressure!!!!!!

I will post pics later!!!

But alas here are the pix MMKK is referring too.


Engine on the Engine Hoist!
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MMKK and his engine! (sorry about the fuzziness- Camera Phone)

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There that one is better

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The Most Air That Engine Has Ever Seen - Vertically Speaking Since It Is An Air Cooled Engine!!!!

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-----------------------------------
Life would be so much easier if we only had the source code.

If brute force doesn't solve your problems, then you aren't using enough.

Posts: 79 | From: Ypsilanti | Registered: Aug 2007  |  IP: Logged
MacManKrisK

Gold Hearted SuperFan!
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Icon 1 posted June 09, 2008 18:00      Profile for MacManKrisK     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Okay, so now there's more story...

I got to tearing things down today. First thing I did was the clutch, because it was just right there. The old friction plate looked pretty well shot, and I replaced the pressure plate for good measure (even though I'm going to keep the old pressure plate as it looks really good still). What concerns me is the flywheel... that's the only part of the whole contraption that I didn't get and it looks kind of glossy, like it had a film on it. I cleaned it with some solvent, hopefully that'll help.

I pulled off the fan/pulley from the back of the engine and went to take off the fan shroud and that's when I noticed one little problem..... You'll notice in the pics that my exhaust system (and thus my "heater boxes") are still attached to the engine. Turns out that I'd forgotten that the heater boxes attach directly to the fan shroud, thus making it impossible to remove. I had to put the chain around the engine again (by myself) and hoist it back up in the air (by myself). Once it was up in the air I drained the oil (like I was supposed to do before I pulled it out... oops), then I took the nuts off the exhaust. Then I pried, and shoved, and pulled, and strained, and grunted... with the engine dangling in the air on the chain and swinging all over the place.

That's when I got smart and took a cue from Sprocket's forum signature. Let's just say it was "hammer time!" 35 more-or-less-well-placed whacks at the exhaust later and it finally fell off. I wish I had pix of me getting the engine back off the chain lift and safely onto the table, it was amusing, but very hard to explain without pix to back it up.

After I got the shroud off (and I must say it came off like butter after the heater boxes were off) I started looking for my oil leak (or.. the signs of the oil leak, anyway). It's kind of like CSI, you're looking for evidence of a leak. Based on all the evidence, it's not my oil cooler that's leaking, nor the oil pump, but instead it's a little doodad that bolts on the side of the engine and lets you screw on a full-flow oil filter. Specifically the gasket between the doodad and the engine is just all tore up. The plan is to create a new gasket with some gasket material and permatex, otherwise I need to spend $90 for a complete gasket kit because I can't just get that gasket separately.

So, yeah, getting an early start tomorrow, hopefully I'll have it all together by the end of the day. [Smile]

--------------------
"Buy low, sell high
get rich and you still die"


Posts: 2331 | From: Southwest Michigan, USA | Registered: Oct 2001  |  IP: Logged
CommanderShroom
BlabberMouth, a Blabber Odyssey
Member # 2097

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Icon 1 posted June 10, 2008 04:35      Profile for CommanderShroom     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
MMKK.

Go to an Autozone or some other parts house. Take the filter adapter with you.

All of the ones I have seen will use the o-ring from a generic filter. Either the stock filter, if you are using an adapter. Or more often a Fram filter from the old Fords. (PH-8a??)

--------------------
Does he know our big secret?
Has one of us confessed?
'Bout the wires circuits and motors
Buried in our chest

Posts: 2465 | From: Utarrrrggggghhh!!!!!!!! | Registered: Mar 2003  |  IP: Logged
drunkennewfiemidget
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Icon 1 posted June 10, 2008 05:26      Profile for drunkennewfiemidget     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I can't imagine availability and pricetag are particularly prohibitive for a new flywheel? I'd get a new one while you have the tranny off. You don't wanna be doing this all over again, do you?
Posts: 4897 | From: Cambridge, ON, Canada | Registered: Jun 2004  |  IP: Logged
MacManKrisK

Gold Hearted SuperFan!
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Icon 1 posted June 10, 2008 06:34      Profile for MacManKrisK     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by CommanderShroom:
MMKK.

Go to an Autozone or some other parts house. Take the filter adapter with you.

All of the ones I have seen will use the o-ring from a generic filter. Either the stock filter, if you are using an adapter. Or more often a Fram filter from the old Fords. (PH-8a??)

It's not a filter adapter in the standard way you think of a filter adapter. It's a bracket that bolts on to the side of the engine, flush with the side of the crankcase. The engine side of the bracket is flat and rectangular and seals to the crankcase with a gasket (this is the gasket that is bad), and the other end of the bracket provides the threads and fitting to screw on a filter. I'll take pix today, and then you can go "wtf?!" when you see them. [Wink]

drunkennewfiemidget: flywheels are expensive and I am very very strapped for cash right now. If I have to jitterbug around for the remainder of the summer, I can deal with it. I'll yank the engine (again!) and change the flywheel in October, at the end of the bus driving season.

--------------------
"Buy low, sell high
get rich and you still die"


Posts: 2331 | From: Southwest Michigan, USA | Registered: Oct 2001  |  IP: Logged
CommanderShroom
BlabberMouth, a Blabber Odyssey
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Icon 1 posted June 10, 2008 06:54      Profile for CommanderShroom     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
OK, I misunderstood what you were referring to.

Those places also sell gasket material. So depending on the gasket itself, you can possibly trace the shape, cut and then seal it up. Anyway, a roll of that comes in handy quite often. And if it is paper gasket, a cheap cereal box gasket with some Red Death will get you back on the road.

On the flywheel.

See if a machine shop can resurface it for you.
Some of the older parts places will have machining facilities. NAPA's typically have them, and barring that, look for just an old machine shop that has been around a while.

Now if they charge more than you can swing for a true resurfacing, you can scuff it up using a low grit sandpaper or even Scotch-bright. It is not the right way, but it can get you by for a while.

The wipe down will not do anything for you if it really is getting slick. It needs a slightly roughened surface to get a good grip.

--------------------
Does he know our big secret?
Has one of us confessed?
'Bout the wires circuits and motors
Buried in our chest

Posts: 2465 | From: Utarrrrggggghhh!!!!!!!! | Registered: Mar 2003  |  IP: Logged
drunkennewfiemidget
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Icon 1 posted June 10, 2008 17:06      Profile for drunkennewfiemidget     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by MacManKrisK:

drunkennewfiemidget: flywheels are expensive and I am very very strapped for cash right now. If I have to jitterbug around for the remainder of the summer, I can deal with it. I'll yank the engine (again!) and change the flywheel in October, at the end of the bus driving season.

Surprising; the Fidanza 7.5lb flywheel for my car is ~$300.
Posts: 4897 | From: Cambridge, ON, Canada | Registered: Jun 2004  |  IP: Logged
Xanthine

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Icon 1 posted June 10, 2008 19:28      Profile for Xanthine     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
$300 is a lot of money when you're strapped for cash. Just sayin'...

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And it's one, two, three / On the wrong side of the lee / What were you meant for? / What were you meant for?
- The Decemberists

Posts: 7670 | From: the lab | Registered: Mar 2001  |  IP: Logged
MacManKrisK

Gold Hearted SuperFan!
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Icon 2 posted June 15, 2008 17:54      Profile for MacManKrisK     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Update: Engine in, exhaust in, everything hooked up. Runs!! [Big Grin]

Problem 1: Clutch - FIXED! It takes off like a smooth cloudy dream.

Problem 2: Gas leak, fuel smell, gas fumes - FIXED! $9.95 at a very friendly local NAPA parts store, an old innertube, a sharp knife, and a little fabrication and all the fuel leaks are sealed.

Problem 3: Oil leak - not fixed. [Frown] I made two new gaskets for oil-related components. The first was for the filter bracket, the other one was for the oil fill pipe. These both needed to be replaced, and both showed signs of leakage.

What /didn't/ show signs of oil leakage was the oil cooler. I inspected it all over and I didn't see any sign that the oil cooler itself was leaking. Little did I know, though, that there IS a leak on the bottom of it, such that a little trickle of oil runs down the bottom when the engine is running. Why, oh why did I not change that oil cooler when I had everything torn apart?! I had a brand new oil cooler, I was 3 nuts away from changing it, but I decided to leave the old one on there (in hopes that I could send the new one back and get my $125 back). [cry baby]

*beats himself over the head*

So, I'm thinking that I just /might/ be able to squeeze that little bastard out of there without having to yank the whole engine again. If I can take the fan shroud off completely with the engine in, I'm home free, but I don't /think/ there's enough room to do that. What I am willing to try, however, is getting the fan shroud off as far as humanly possible, then seeing if I can /just/ get my 13mm end wrench up there and on those nuts. Of course to move and/or remove the fan shroud means I need to, once again, remove the exhaust and the oil filler pipe, which means draining out my nice, new, clean oil. Guess I need to buy a nice, new, clean oil pan to drain it into, then I can pour it back in when I'm done... and pray that it doesn't leak out.

*sigh* I feel like such a moron... [shake head]

--------------------
"Buy low, sell high
get rich and you still die"


Posts: 2331 | From: Southwest Michigan, USA | Registered: Oct 2001  |  IP: Logged
MacManKrisK

Gold Hearted SuperFan!
Member # 955

Member Rated:
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Icon 7 posted June 16, 2008 19:15      Profile for MacManKrisK     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Oil Leak - FIXED!! [Big Grin] [Big Grin] [Big Grin] [Big Grin] [Big Grin]

This was a lesson in patience and self-forgiveness. A little patience and planning and I got the fan shroud off with the engine still in the vehicle. I had to remove a few other things first: two pieces of cooling tin, the muffler, the exhaust headers (with heater boxes). It's amazing, though, I'm well-practiced at getting that stuff off and on now, since I just put them on yesterday. [Smile]

Once the fan shroud was off, there was the oil cooler. Three nuts and the old one was off. A little permatex on the *new* rubber seals, slide the new cooler on, put the three nuts on and put it all back together and NO LEAKS!

*does a happy dance* [Smile]

--------------------
"Buy low, sell high
get rich and you still die"


Posts: 2331 | From: Southwest Michigan, USA | Registered: Oct 2001  |  IP: Logged


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