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Author Topic: Recipes: Low fat/salt, vegetarian, and vegan
fs

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Icon 1 posted July 29, 2007 05:09      Profile for fs   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Rather than continue to intersperse them in the Hypertension thread, I thought we could just post recipes and cooking resources here. [Smile]

Other threads with recipes:

Cooking help (substitutions, conversions, etc.)


(And as I discovered, Calli thinks that being a vegetarian/vegan is completely stupid. [Razz] However he has a most extensive knowledge of cookery and recipes and could probably offer a multitude of delicious, healthy recipes... after all, not everything that tastes good is bad for you. [Big Grin] )

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fs

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Icon 1 posted July 29, 2007 05:11      Profile for fs   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
For years I've preferred using beans from a can because I could never quite get dried beans to reconstitute properly. I greatly appreciate the reduced weight and cupboard space requirements of using dry, however. I finally worked out directions for preparation that give me the consistency and flavor I want.

First, the proper proportion, if substituting dried beans for canned:
1/2 cup dried will equal approximately 1 15oz can after preparation

Add beans to pot. Cover with 2-3 inches of water and bring to a boil. Boil for 3-5 minutes, turn off heat, and allow beans to sit on burner for 2-3 hours until cool.

Drain and rinse beans, replace in pot, and again cover with approximately 2 inches of water. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer for 2-3 hours until soft.

At this point you can either use the beans or allow them to cool to room temperature, place in an airtight container (with the water they were cooked in), and refrigerate for use the next day.

It's easiest to prepare dried beans ahead of time for the next day:
  • Do the quick boil in the morning before work
  • Let them sit during the day
  • Start the simmering while preparing dinner
  • After 2 hours turn off heat and let cool
  • Place in airtight container and refrigerate before bed


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skylar
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Icon 1 posted July 29, 2007 05:24      Profile for skylar     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I don't have any ideas or recipes, I'm afraid, but I just wanted to add that I'm bookmarking this thread right now, on the off chance that you kind people will contribute stuff [Smile] . I'm trying really hard to get into losing weight/becoming healthy, and it's kinda a new project, so I need all the help I can get!

Come on, you know you want to [Wink]

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stevenback7
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Icon 1 posted July 29, 2007 06:29      Profile for stevenback7   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
120 calories

Yes I know I stole this from reddit and digg - so what.

This site gives people an understanding of what 120 calories looks like for different kinds of food. So you can have 1.8 Kg of celery or you can have half a chocolate bar both with 120 calories. It's not that practical but it does get a point across to people.

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fs

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Icon 1 posted July 29, 2007 09:13      Profile for fs   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Tonight, I'm making beans and rice. I make a full recipe since it freezes well. I'll have steamed asparagus spears on the side.

Black Beans and Rice
(vegan, makes 6 2/3 cup servings)

1/2 tsp oil or cooking spray
1 small yellow onion, chopped
1 stalk of celery, chopped
2 Tbs chives, chopped (fresh or frozen)
2 Tbs parsley, chopped (fresh or frozen)
4 cloves of garlic, crushed or minced
1 tsp sambal olek or crushed/minced hot pepper (optional, or use to taste)
1 cup rice (I usually use a medium grain white)
2 1/2 cups vegetable stock or water+boullion cube (use low fat/salt varieties if desired)
1 15oz can of black beans, rinsed and drained (or if prepare 1/2 cup from dry)
coarse ground black pepper, to taste

In a medium saucepan, add oil or spray with cooking spray and heat over medium heat. Add onion, celery, garlic, chives, parsley, and sambal olek and saute until vegetables are soft (5-6 minutes). Add dry rice and continue cooking over medium heat until the rice is lightly browned, stirring frequently (3-4 minutes). Add the stock* and stir once to mix. Heat to boiling and then cover pot and reduce heat to simmer until the rice is tender (about 20 minutes). Add beans and cook for an additional 5-10 minutes.

*If you opt for water+boullion cube, crush the cube and mix with the water prior to adding otherwise only the rice closest to the cube will absorb the flavor.

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GrumpySteen

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Icon 1 posted July 29, 2007 10:19      Profile for GrumpySteen     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
fs wrote:
For years I've preferred using beans from a can because I could never quite get dried beans to reconstitute properly. I greatly appreciate the reduced weight and cupboard space requirements of using dry, however.

Have you tried rinsing them in the morning, adding them to a crock pot filled with water and leaving them to cook at low temperature all day? It takes 6-12 hours depending on the type of bean and how soft you want them to get, but I've always gotten very good results cookng beans this way.

Also, you can add cloves of garlic, chopped onion and black pepper and they'll pick up a nice flavor that goes well with most bean dishes and isn't too bad on it's own. You may want to add some salt, too, if you aren't limiting sodium.

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fs

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Icon 1 posted July 29, 2007 11:20      Profile for fs   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Steen:
fs wrote:
For years I've preferred using beans from a can because I could never quite get dried beans to reconstitute properly. I greatly appreciate the reduced weight and cupboard space requirements of using dry, however.

Have you tried rinsing them in the morning, adding them to a crock pot filled with water and leaving them to cook at low temperature all day? It takes 6-12 hours depending on the type of bean and how soft you want them to get, but I've always gotten very good results cookng beans this way.

Also, you can add cloves of garlic, chopped onion and black pepper and they'll pick up a nice flavor that goes well with most bean dishes and isn't too bad on it's own. You may want to add some salt, too, if you aren't limiting sodium.

No crockpot here. I'll pick one up eventually, and a rice steamer too.

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Ashitaka

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Icon 14 posted July 29, 2007 13:32      Profile for Ashitaka     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
The tomatos, egg plant (aubergine), and onions are all ready in the garden now so it is time for what some call poor mans caviar or egg plant caviar and many other things.

you need,
eggplant
tomatoes
onion
parsely
olive oil

cook up a bunch of eggplant (with someolive oil on it) in the oven or on a grill. (until it is done)

when this is done and a bit cool chop up the cooked eggplant, tomatoes, onions and parsely and put it in a bowl.

Blend half of what you have in a food processor or blender. mix back in.

Add basil, oregano, salt and a bit of lemon juice to taste.

Eat on a hearty bread or crackers.

This recipe is made with things that come out of a common summer garden. That is why there are no amounts. You throw in what is ripe.

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Xanthine

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Icon 1 posted July 29, 2007 19:10      Profile for Xanthine     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
You're going to have to decide for yourselves if it's low fat or low salt, but it's definitely vegan:

Roast some garlic. As much as you like. When it's all nice and soft, chop it up.

Toast some walnuts. As much as you like. It you don't like walnuts, pine nuts would probably also work.

While that's going on, cook some spaghetti. ~3/4 of a 1 pound package works for me, but YMMV.

Chop a couple fresh tomatoes. More if you desire.

Drain the spaghetti. Throw in everything else. Drizzle on as much olive oil as you want. Salt to taste. Mix the whole mess up and eat.

Quick, easy, and yummy.

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fs

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Icon 1 posted July 30, 2007 03:48      Profile for fs   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Tonight I'm making more beans and rice. The green peppers didn't look very good when I was shopping, so I'm going to substitute a sweet red pepper. (I'll freeze a bunch of this, too. I divide the leftovers into .5 liter/2 cup containers which is just right for 2 large servings.)

Red Beans and Rice
(vegan, 6-8 servings)

1 teaspoon olive oil
1 medium yellow onion, chopped
1 medium green pepper, diced
2 stalks celery, sliced
1 clove garlic, crushed
hot pepper (I like cayenne or spanish for this) chopped fine, add to taste

2 15oz cans of kidney beans in water (1 cup, if substituting dry)
4 cups water

Add oil to a large saucepan, and heat. Saute veggies, garlic, and pepper over medium heat for about 5 minutes. Add beans and water and bring to a boil, then reduce heat and simmer for about an hour, stirring occasionally. (When adding the beans, do not drain.)

Add:
1 tablespoon chopped parsley (fresh or frozen)
2 teaspoons oregano
1 teaspoon thyme
1/4 teaspoon course ground black pepper
1/4 teaspoon ground cayenne pepper
1 boullion cube (I use the vegetarian variety, obviously =)
salt, to taste (I don't add any, I find the boullion cube sufficient.)

Continue cooking over medium heat for another 30 minutes. Prepare 6 servings of rice according to the directions on the package. Check beans, bring to a boil until beans/vegetables reach desired tenderness, if necessary. Remove from heat and combine rice with beans, stirring until well mixed.

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BooBooKitty

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Icon 1 posted July 30, 2007 05:04      Profile for BooBooKitty     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Thanks for the recipes, fs! I think I will swing by the grocery store to pick up a few items on the way home and try one of the recipes.

In the meantime, be careful of the sodium content on any prepared broths and bouillion cubes. These things are usually notorious for high sodium content.

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fs

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Icon 1 posted July 30, 2007 05:59      Profile for fs   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by BooBooKitty:
In the meantime, be careful of the sodium content on any prepared broths and bouillion cubes. These things are usually notorious for high sodium content.

Yeah. I like the convenience, but I usually dilute it more than the directions say and add extra spices (pepper!) to increase the flavor. (1/2 cube to 2 cups liquid instead of a full cube). I also don't add extra salt on top of it.

For quick reference, one teaspoon of table salt contains 2300 milligrams of sodium. 1 bouillion cube usually contains between 800-900.

Sodium content of vegetarian broths and bouillion

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Callipygous
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Icon 1 posted July 30, 2007 06:33      Profile for Callipygous     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Whenever I see bean recipes, I think of Captain Beefheart (Don Van Vliet) as beans seemed to loom large in his universe. Why is he almost forgotten now?

Back on topic one of the food blogs I follow is The Passionate Cook. Like many food blogs, she mainly does fancy pants dinner party food, which makes for impressive photography, but does not interest me. However she does also have a few simpler recipes for kitchen meals, and even in the others she has a good sense of what things combine well, so she may inspire you. Her pasta sauce that is a marriage of guacamole and pesto sauce is quick easy and good. Mediterranean food is the best summer food IMO, and a couple of Italian aubergine dishes occur to me, melanzane parmigiana, which is aubergines tomato sauce and mozarella baked in the oven, and caponata which is light slightly sweet pickle of aubergines, onions, and celery. Google will provide plenty of recipes for either dish.

As far as low salt goes, please don't be too extreme, as salt in moderation releases the flavour of many ingredients. For example if you have ever made your own bread and forgotten the salt, your loaves will have all the flavour of blotting paper. I put a bare pinch of salt in anything made with flour if the taste of the flour is part of the dish. Rice and pasta are also both tasteless if cooked without salt. I think the best attitude is to regard seasoning as there to bring out the essential flavour of the dish, though once it tastes salty you have gone too far. An interesting experiment you can perform is to take two glasses of ordinary red wine and sprinkle a few grains of salt onto one. Then smell both glasses. The salted glass has a significantly more intense aroma, though of course the salt does nothing good for its taste!

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Stereo

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Icon 11 posted July 30, 2007 07:52      Profile for Stereo     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Callipygous:
Rice and pasta are also both tasteless if cooked without salt.

There IS actually something we disagree on! [Eek!] ... [Wink] I like both cooked without any amount of salt added. Granted, soy sauce on the rice puts in plenty of salt, but I sometime eat it white. As for the pasta, if you find them too bland, try some flavoured ones, or whole wheat. They taste plenty all by themselves.

As for a low-salt, low-fat recipe, I'll just share with you my newly discovered wonder-food: baba gannouj*. It's great as a veggie dip. And I spread it on a tortilla, add some cold chicken or other meat**, add lettuce or other greens (I tried asparagus once - yum!), roll, and eat. It's my own version of a wrap.

*I buy it all made, but there are plenty of recipes availables. I may try to bake mine someday.
** I sometimes use sandwich meat, but for lower salt, use leftovers from a roast. Or use a substitute or some other fillings for a vegetarian/vegan version. Grilled onions, maybe?

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fs

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Icon 1 posted August 05, 2007 02:57      Profile for fs   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I'm still working on this recipe; I'd like the bread to come out darker than it does.

FS's Pumpernickel Bread
(vegetarian, makes 4 small loaves)

2 cups warm water
1 yeast cube
1/4 cup dark molasses or malt syrup
1 Tbs softened butter or margarine
2 Tbs plain yogurt

3 cups all-purpose flour
3 cups rye flour
2 Tbs unsweetened cocoa
1 Tbs instant coffee
1 Tbs anise or caraway seeds (optional)
2/3 tsp salt

Combine water, yeast, and molasses. Let sit for 5 minutes. Stir in butter and yogurt. Mix* in flour, cocoa, coffee, salt, and anise. Knead* dough for 8-10 minutes.

Divide dough into 4 parts, form into balls. (I put 3 of them straight into the freezer.) Put remaining ball into a greased bowl, turning over once so that the top is greased also. Cover and let rise for about an hour, until dough is doubled.

Punch down dough and turn out onto lightly floured counter. Knead by hand, about 5 minutes. (Knead in as much white flour as necessary to keep dough from sticking. Shape into loaf and place on greased baking sheet. Cover and let rise about an hour, until about doubled. Slash each loaf diagonally 3 times. (I don't know that you have to do this, but I like the aesthetic so I've never tried without.)

Bake at 350F oven for about 20 minutes, until loaf sounds hollow when tapped. (Optional: Brush tops with shortening or butter.) Cool, covered with a towel, on a rack.


*I use a machine for these steps.

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GrumpySteen

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Icon 1 posted August 05, 2007 09:26      Profile for GrumpySteen     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Try replacing the all purpose flour with unbleached all purpose flour. If it's still not dark enough for your taste, substitute part of the all purpose flour with whole wheat bread flour, but you'll generally have to add more liquid, knead the dough longer and give it longer to rise in order to avoid overly dense loaves.

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fs

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Icon 1 posted August 10, 2007 00:57      Profile for fs   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I had to start making refried beans because the mexican food selection here really isn't that great. I can knock together some pretty decent burritos, nachos, or bean dip with these.

Refried Beans
vegan, 6-8 servings

1 1/4 cup dried pinto beans
1 medium yellow onion, chopped
1 tsp olive oil
salt and pepper to taste

Prepare beans according to directions. Drain beans, reserving about 2 cups of liquid.

In a large skillet, saute the onion in the olive oil for about 3 minutes over medium-high heat. Add 1/4 cup of the liquid from the beans and simmer uncovered until liquid has evaporated, stirring occasionally. Repeat until onions are soft.

Reduce to medium heat. Add 1/2 cup beans and some of the liquid to the skillet. Mash the beans, liquid, and onions together. (I find a sturdy, flat plastic spoon works well in nonstick cookware; if you are using cast iron, a potato masher would probably be easier.) Repeat until all beans and liquid are used.

Add salt and pepper to taste (I like about 1/3 tsp salt and 1 tsp coarse black pepper). Continue cooking over medium heat, stirring frequently, until desired consistency is reached. (For burritos or nachos, I prefer a thicker paste. For combining into dips, I think it mixes better if it's a little more liquid.)

For more flavor, you can add a tablespoon of finely chopped hot pepper and a couple cloves of crushed or minced garlic with the onion. You can replace the salt and pepper with taco seasoning or other spices.

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