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Author Topic: A Lost Lemon
LemonSmuggler
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Icon 1 posted July 16, 2007 13:14      Profile for LemonSmuggler     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I think I told you guys in the past but anyways I just moved recently. I'll be 18 in a couple of weeks and instead of taking the normal rout to college, I'v e decided that the best choice for me is to get my GED. So I'm studying, then in about three months at the lest, and six months at the most, I'll be ready to take the test. Hopefully I'll pass. I've always wanted to go to college I still want to go, so after I (hopefully) pass the GED test I'm going to in roll at the community college near my home and stay there for a year or two, study for the SAT, and hopefully get into a state or privet school.

Here's my question for you guys, am I just completely crazy doing this? And also is becoming a journalist to far fechted? Should I just face reality and resign myself to so ick job I can't stand all for the sake of making a decent living?

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Oy to the vey.

Posts: 182 | From: My pillow/blanket fort that kicks your forts bum | Registered: Mar 2007  |  IP: Logged
CommanderShroom
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Icon 1 posted July 16, 2007 13:53      Profile for CommanderShroom     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Hey Lemon,

A word of advice about getting a GED rather than a HS diploma. Don't do it.

I dropped out when I was 16, left home and after a few adventures living in a VW bug, joined Job Corps and was able to get one there. In all honesty, a diploma looks better on a resume, makes it easier to attend a real college, and in all honesty is less embarrassing to show than a sheet of paper with a bunch of test scores on it.

It has taken me twice as long to get half as far in life. My advice to you is if you can stick it out, do so. You cannot be very far away from graduating, so why piss it away when you are so close to the end?

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Does he know our big secret?
Has one of us confessed?
'Bout the wires circuits and motors
Buried in our chest

Posts: 2465 | From: Utarrrrggggghhh!!!!!!!! | Registered: Mar 2003  |  IP: Logged
Richard Wolf VI
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Icon 10 posted July 16, 2007 20:56      Profile for Richard Wolf VI   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
If you're not on a hurry it seems OK, but concontrasts sharply with my doctorate-before-25 plan. So I don't know. Let your heart decide.

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Xanthine

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Icon 1 posted July 16, 2007 21:55      Profile for Xanthine     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Lemon, what do you gain by getting a GED as opposed to just finishing HS? I ask because Shroom's right - colleges prefer a HS diploma over a GED. As far as journalism vs. something else, well, to quote my HS chemistry teacher (and teaching public school ain't a road to riches), "Do what you love and the money thing will sort itself out."

quote:
Originally posted by iWanToUseaMac:
If you're not on a hurry it seems OK, but concontrasts sharply with my doctorate-before-25 plan.

Good luck with that plan. Seriously. If you're so good you can get out early, your adviser isn't going to let you go without a fight.

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And it's one, two, three / On the wrong side of the lee / What were you meant for? / What were you meant for?
- The Decemberists

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Highlie
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Icon 1 posted July 17, 2007 06:39      Profile for business attire     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Hey! My brother is getting a GED!
 -

He also is an 18 year old white-boy-with-dreadlocks who dropped out when he was 16, smokes pot 4 times a day, has been in rehab for drinking, and wants to be an auto mechanic.

just sayin'...

P.S. -- iWan: nobody likes a showoff or a braggart. STFU.

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NoRealReason
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Icon 1 posted July 17, 2007 07:09      Profile for NoRealReason   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Lemon,
I have no experience in this (having been on the 5 year/4 summers plan for college), but could you speak to someone at your new high school about an accelerated program? Something where you take AP courses, and maybe attend some night schools, to get out after the first 18 weeks/semester. Maybe there are courses to take at the community college that would suffice for the high school requirements? That, or maybe you could stick it out in high school, and still take on some classes at the CC to get a head start. Anyway, I admire your ambition [Applause] , and being aware of the educational quality of Arizona public high schools, I cannot blame you for minimizing your exposure (little sun joke there, get it? exposure? OK, so I only amuse myself).
On the other hand, I have always been of the opinion that you only get out of school what you put into it. You could send a slacker to Harvard for 4 years, and a go-getter to a state 'party school' for the same, and I believe the go getter will get the better education. Aside from safety issues, I don't think a school systems short-comings (poor teaching or class size or many other factors) *prevent* you from obtaining an education, they just make it more difficult, especially if you don't put the effort forward.
Just my opinion, please feel free to disagree.
Good Luck

Posts: 70 | From: Never you mind | Registered: Jan 2007  |  IP: Logged
stevenback7
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Icon 1 posted July 17, 2007 08:36      Profile for stevenback7   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Here's my question for you guys, am I just completely crazy doing this? And also is becoming a journalist to far fechted? Should I just face reality and resign myself to so ick job I can't stand all for the sake of making a decent living?
Well I can't help you on your first question - but as for being a journalist or anything else nothing is to far fetched as long as you keep trying. When i look at a career one of the things i look at is how much the average person makes, lowest percentile, and highest.I think for journalism your average pay is enough to be able to sustain a living. Here is just some figures I quickly pulled of the web and they look okay:

Average starting salary: $28,100
Average salary after 5 years: $44,600
Average salary after 10 to 15 years: $69,300

Money should always be one of the last things which decides a career path - if you love the field then you should go for it and not worry about the money.

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Comic Book Guy: There is no emoticon for what i'm feeling.

Posts: 1199 | From: Canada eh? | Registered: May 2006  |  IP: Logged
stevenback7
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Icon 1 posted July 17, 2007 08:40      Profile for stevenback7   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
sorry for the double post - I.E. 7 did something weird again.

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Comic Book Guy: There is no emoticon for what i'm feeling.

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dragonman97

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Icon 1 posted July 17, 2007 09:46      Profile for dragonman97   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Well duh...don't use IE! [Wink]

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There are three things you can be sure of in life: Death, taxes, and reading about fake illnesses online...

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fs

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Icon 1 posted July 17, 2007 11:13      Profile for fs   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Does anyone actually care about high school once you have a college degree? I've never even bothered to put it on my resume (space saving) and nobody has ever asked. L.S. what do your SAT/ACT scores look like?

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I'm in ur database, makin' moar recordz.

Posts: 1973 | From: The Cat Ship | Registered: Mar 2002  |  IP: Logged
LemonSmuggler
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Icon 1 posted July 17, 2007 11:15      Profile for LemonSmuggler     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Thanks guys, I think I should just clear up one thing, I've been home-schooled my whole life, went to an online high school and then moved here. It turns out I'm about 1 1/2 to two credits shy of being a jr. even though I did jr. work last year and should have been in my fourth year this fall.

My fear of public humiliation comes into play here as I can't help thinking it would suck to be a third year student again at 18, but even worse the idea of being a second year student at 18. If high-school is any thing like (some of) the kids at crew and on MTV I really don't stand a chance in hell.

I just feel antsy with the whole thing; I'm ready to get my life started.

But convinced that I need to make a fully informed decision my mom is calling the school today to find out.

You guys are great ya know that? And thanks for the advice! [Wink] [Applause]

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Oy to the vey.

Posts: 182 | From: My pillow/blanket fort that kicks your forts bum | Registered: Mar 2007  |  IP: Logged
Xanthine

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Icon 1 posted July 17, 2007 11:17      Profile for Xanthine     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
LS: there's probably a way for a bright and motivated student like you to play catch up. And if the HS is big enough, you can hide from the evil people. Trust me on that one...

fs: No, they don't care...after you've been to college. Until then, it matters, especially to college admission commitees, and, because fairness is NOT the name of the game, admissions officers look at a GED and think "quitter".

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And it's one, two, three / On the wrong side of the lee / What were you meant for? / What were you meant for?
- The Decemberists

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WinterSolstice

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Icon 1 posted July 17, 2007 12:39      Profile for WinterSolstice     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I was home schooled, and there are definitely ways to play catch up. Check with whatever program you're using, or the district you're working with.

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fs

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Icon 1 posted July 17, 2007 13:40      Profile for fs   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
L.S., in that instance, many colleges will look at standardized test scores and scores on entrance exams. What you need to do is contact the colleges you are considering attending and find out what they require from homeschooled students.

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I'm in ur database, makin' moar recordz.

Posts: 1973 | From: The Cat Ship | Registered: Mar 2002  |  IP: Logged
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Icon 1 posted July 18, 2007 05:50      Profile for business attire     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Hey, who's to say you have to TELL them you're 18? Just keep your mouth shut about it, and its no problem.

But what's more, its NOT usually 6 months at the most. My brother has been working on his for an entire year now (has problems with the English tests). My Aunt tutors older uneducated people (30's and 40's) to help get their GED and she said its the hardest thing people have ever gone through.

Not only will a diploma make your life much easier, but it is probably also faster. I think you can request tests to skip grades, you can here anyway. Why don't you check if you can take a test to prove that you're above 11th grade knowledge? And if you don't pass, then you know where you need to be anyway. The earlier you drop out of HS, the harder its going to be to get a GED anyway, just because a lot of base knowledge won't be there and you'll essentially have to teach it to yourself.

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CommanderShroom
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Icon 1 posted July 18, 2007 13:02      Profile for CommanderShroom     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Also consider the possibility of continuation type schools. Letter grades and a real diploma.

GED's are not a true measure of intellect, but for certain things they are the only thing that people have to judge you on.

So if you decide to go the route of a GED, just don't let anyone stop you from doing the things you want in life.

But do some research into other options before setting yourself on this route. Be absolutely certain that this will work for you in the long run.

Good luck however you choose.

--------------------
Does he know our big secret?
Has one of us confessed?
'Bout the wires circuits and motors
Buried in our chest

Posts: 2465 | From: Utarrrrggggghhh!!!!!!!! | Registered: Mar 2003  |  IP: Logged
LemonSmuggler
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Icon 1 posted July 19, 2007 18:09      Profile for LemonSmuggler     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Thanks guys! Okay here's another idea my parents have proposed. And they seem to think it will work, I have my doubts. Since I was home-schooled and will be 18 I could just go into the community college in my town and then in a year or two, (most likely two) move over to a unversity.

I have doubts though that they (The unversities) would except me with no GED, and my two years at a community school and me telling them that I was home-schooled. Could that really work?

Posts: 182 | From: My pillow/blanket fort that kicks your forts bum | Registered: Mar 2007  |  IP: Logged
Rhonwyyn

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Icon 1 posted July 19, 2007 18:20      Profile for Rhonwyyn   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Easiest answer to your latest question, Lemon? Get on the phone and ask the admissions advisor at your local community college. They've most likely dealt with every educational possibility under the sun, so they would have much better advice than many (if not most) of us here.

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Change the way you SEE, not the way you LOOK!

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littlenewsie
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Icon 1 posted July 26, 2007 21:32      Profile for littlenewsie     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
As a recent high school graduate, I can tell you this. No one will care how old you are. There's all sorts of ages. I was one of the youngest, graduating at 17 but I do believe there was a 16 year old who graduated too. There were some 19 year olds too. It ran the gamut. Besides, I switched school districts early on in my school "career." The cut-off dates for entering school vary district to district so that's why the ages vary. If I started in my current school district, I'd just be a senior this year. Credits are really easy to make up too. Don't sweat.

Go fellow journalist wannabe! That's what I'm going to college for.

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"Teachers ramble on and on about freedom of the press but God help you if you try to use it." Gordon Korman

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Xanthine

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Icon 1 posted July 26, 2007 22:04      Profile for Xanthine     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by LemonSmuggler:
I have doubts though that they (The unversities) would except me with no GED, and my two years at a community school and me telling them that I was home-schooled. Could that really work?

Universities typically only look at your most recent diploma and ignore anything that came before, so if you're smart with your two years of community college and earn yourself an associate's degree, the university won't care that you don't have a HS diploma. But do what Rhon said and talk to someone at your local community college.

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And it's one, two, three / On the wrong side of the lee / What were you meant for? / What were you meant for?
- The Decemberists

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fs

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Icon 1 posted July 27, 2007 01:39      Profile for fs   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by LemonSmuggler:
Thanks guys! Okay here's another idea my parents have proposed. And they seem to think it will work, I have my doubts. Since I was home-schooled and will be 18 I could just go into the community college in my town and then in a year or two, (most likely two) move over to a unversity.

I have doubts though that they (The unversities) would except me with no GED, and my two years at a community school and me telling them that I was home-schooled. Could that really work?

Like Xanthine said.

You really need to start calling the colleges you are interested in and talking to them. You've pretty much received all the help/advice we can offer. Everything is going to be college-specific. You might compile a list of admissions email addresses and compose an email with all your questions and send it to all the colleges you are considering.

A couple years at a (less expensive!) community college would probably be fine, especially if you are transferring into a state school. I know in NY many of the community colleges have two year programs for some majors (not all) that are designed to facilitate transfer into four year programs at specific SUNY schools. If you are considering doing something like that, it's best to talk directly to the school where you plan on getting your BA and finding out which schools you can most easily transfer in from.

But you really do have to talk to the schools at this point.

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I'm in ur database, makin' moar recordz.

Posts: 1973 | From: The Cat Ship | Registered: Mar 2002  |  IP: Logged


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