homeGeek CultureWebstoreeCards!Forums!Joy of Tech!AY2K!webcam

The Geek Culture Forums


Post New Topic  New Poll  Post A Reply
my profile | directory login | | search | faq | forum home
  next oldest topic   next newest topic
» The Geek Culture Forums   » News, Reviews, Views!   » Our stupid lives   » a (Page 1)

 - UBBFriend: Email this page to someone!  
This topic comprises 2 pages: 1  2 
 
Author Topic: a
Kinguy
Geek
Member # 4527

Member Rated:
5
Icon 1 posted October 30, 2005 11:48      Profile for Kinguy     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 

Posts: 181 | Registered: Oct 2005  |  IP: Logged
Rhonwyyn

Solid Gold SuperFan!
Member # 2854

Member Rated:
4
Icon 1 posted October 30, 2005 12:02      Profile for Rhonwyyn   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I actually have a full menu I need to make today: bread, chicken corn soup, and apricot pudding. We're taking food into work tomorrow, so I need to get cooking.

--------------------
Change the way you SEE, not the way you LOOK!

Posts: 3849 | From: Lancaster, PA | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged
Kinguy
Geek
Member # 4527

Member Rated:
5
Icon 1 posted October 30, 2005 12:06      Profile for Kinguy     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 

Posts: 181 | Registered: Oct 2005  |  IP: Logged
Charliemp
Maximum Newbie
Member # 4520

Rate Member
Icon 1 posted October 30, 2005 13:01      Profile for Charliemp     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I like to cook, I am not to fond of baking though.
Posts: 12 | From: Washington | Registered: Oct 2005  |  IP: Logged
Bibo
BlabberMouth, the Next Generation
Member # 1959

Member Rated:
4
Icon 1 posted October 30, 2005 14:21      Profile for Bibo   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I started to cook around age 14 (25 years ago [Eek!] ). I made beef wellington, encrusted meatloaf (pre-vegetarian days), and a 6 layer chocolate torte at age 16. I took a cooking class in high school that taught me many things about baking and seasoning. I should have gone to culinary school but spent more time with photography. I find myself watching lots of the Food Network for ideas. I recently purchased  - this set of cookware along with a Calphalon omelet pan to replace my 15 year old set of T-Fal non-stick, I don't think I'll ever go back to non-stick cookware. My kitchen is full of many cooking gadgets. Now I just wish I had a larger kitchen [Frown]
Posts: 1641 | From: Grand Rapids, MI | Registered: Jan 2003  |  IP: Logged
Rhonwyyn

Solid Gold SuperFan!
Member # 2854

Member Rated:
4
Icon 1 posted October 30, 2005 16:08      Profile for Rhonwyyn   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
why don't you like non-stick? Except for the fact that it does stick sometimes. The house I"m renting has Calphalon that I'm learning to use. I'm not sure that I like it.

--------------------
Change the way you SEE, not the way you LOOK!

Posts: 3849 | From: Lancaster, PA | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged
Kinguy
Geek
Member # 4527

Member Rated:
5
Icon 1 posted October 30, 2005 16:13      Profile for Kinguy     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 

Posts: 181 | Registered: Oct 2005  |  IP: Logged
YaYawoman

Solid Nitrozanium SuperFan!
Member # 4505

Member Rated:
5
Icon 1 posted October 30, 2005 16:45      Profile for YaYawoman     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I'm not going to be able to answer your question. I am one of the sorry kitchen challenged. Some things I can cook, eggs,omelettes, throw it all in a roaster and check it in 3 hrs, other than that.....god bless betty crocker and take-out. The look of fear that crosses my children's faces when I tell them I am going to try to cook something new for dinner is truly priceless. My question for all kitchen divas is-- what is so different about calphalon(SP?)--isn't a pot a pot? What do you have to do different to use it, and does it make much difference? Thanks bye.
Posts: 765 | From: virginia | Registered: Oct 2005  |  IP: Logged
Bibo
BlabberMouth, the Next Generation
Member # 1959

Member Rated:
4
Icon 1 posted October 30, 2005 16:52      Profile for Bibo   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Non-stick cookware has been reported to release carcinogens. Not to mention the fact that the non-stick coating starts to wear off. My wife had some cookware that I used once to make alfredo sauce in, it looked like I had added black pepper to the sauce, this was the non-stick coating that had come off while cooking the sauce. I noticed my T-fal had worn down and was flaking off too and I had always used utensils that were safe for non-stick pans.
Posts: 1641 | From: Grand Rapids, MI | Registered: Jan 2003  |  IP: Logged
i_need_a_pillow
Geek
Member # 2765

Rate Member
Icon 1 posted October 30, 2005 18:31      Profile for i_need_a_pillow     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I like to cook whenever I have time. Mostly I focus on baking, but I've also learned several dishes from the Filipino side of my family.

--------------------
The Guide is definitive. Reality is frequently inaccurate.

Posts: 104 | From: I'm here. Where else? | Registered: Jun 2004  |  IP: Logged
Rhonwyyn

Solid Gold SuperFan!
Member # 2854

Member Rated:
4
Icon 1 posted October 30, 2005 19:32      Profile for Rhonwyyn   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Calphalon is hard-anodized aluminum. It cooks hotter and faster than other cookware.

I just got done putting bread in the oven. Dumb thing is, the house only has two bread pans, so I had to come up with something else for the other two loaves: bundt pan. I'll let you know how it turns out. [crazy]

--------------------
Change the way you SEE, not the way you LOOK!

Posts: 3849 | From: Lancaster, PA | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged
YaYawoman

Solid Nitrozanium SuperFan!
Member # 4505

Member Rated:
5
Icon 1 posted October 30, 2005 19:48      Profile for YaYawoman     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Thank you for the explanation. That is definitely not the cookware for me. The smoke alarm goes off enough without "hotter and faster".

Good luck with the food you are cooking tonight. I bet it smells great. Bundt-bread will look pretty cool on the table, eh?

Posts: 765 | From: virginia | Registered: Oct 2005  |  IP: Logged
Colonel Panic
BlabberMouth, the Next Generation
Member # 1200

Icon 1 posted October 30, 2005 20:36      Profile for Colonel Panic         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I love to cook. And bake.

Cooking is a great thing to know for a bachelor. And even better for a geek guy to know.

Non-stick cookware is known to kill birds if it is overheated. Ever hear about the canary in the coal mines? Same kind of thing. Non-stick is not dishwasher safe; the detergents in the dishwasher can accelerate the deterioration of the coating.

Aluminum has been linked by some to alzheimer's disease. If you're using that stuff it's probably OK, since you'll forget I wrote this.

18/10 stainless steel, with no non-stick surface, can be excellent cookware. Use a non-stick vegetable spray if you're watching your fats and you would like to keep cleanup simple. Otherwise, olive or canola oil is good for the heart. Steel is particularly good for vegetables and grains. For meats, well-seasoned cast iron is wonderful -- and it adds iron to your diet!

I try to keep up with the latest stuff for cooking, and I'm in the process of totally remodeling my kitchen, now. I love convection ovens for baking and roasting. And I'm looking forward to the new steam/convection ovens that are coming out. I'm thinking a mac mini with a 20" lcd display and bluetooth keyboard and mouse will be part of the deal, too. Better than fumbling with paper recipes. Kick in the iTunes and why leave the kitchen? I don't have room for a larger screen, though.

Favorite tools? I have this monster 8" chef's knife. 10" Cast iron skillet. 12" covered stainless skillet.

Life begins and ends with a good vegetable and herb garden. Home-canned (or frozen) tomato sauce is nothing like the junk you buy at the grocers.

Last night, took some chicken thighs that were on sale. Seared them in olive oil. Simmered them with balsalmic vinegar, oregano and a touch of thyme. Added garlic-sauteed portobello mushrooms.

Removed the thighs, thickend the sauce with a bit of flour.

Served with brown rice and a nice little California Shiraz.

Maybe some of the Shiraz made it into the sauce, too.

Simple Worked. Beats the heck out of placenta helper.


CP

--------------------
Free! Free at last!

Posts: 1809 | From: Glacier Melt, USA | Registered: Mar 2002  |  IP: Logged
dragonman97

SuperFan!
Member # 780

Member Rated:
4
Icon 1 posted October 30, 2005 20:36      Profile for dragonman97   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
/me learned a useful lesson in cooking by being careful - always make sure all the required items are present before cooking. I have a friend who doesn't cook at all, and I was house+cat-sitting for her, and trying to make a nice meal for company...and it involved cheese. However, she didn't have a grater. One trip to a friend's place fixed that matter, but otherwise I would have had to get downright creative. [Wink] All in all, it came out well, and my friend was impressed to learn that her kitchen was actually capable of producing food. [Big Grin]

--------------------
There are three things you can be sure of in life: Death, taxes, and reading about fake illnesses online...

Posts: 9332 | From: Westchester County, New York | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Colonel Panic
BlabberMouth, the Next Generation
Member # 1200

Icon 1 posted October 30, 2005 21:13      Profile for Colonel Panic         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by dragonman97:
/me learned a useful lesson in cooking by being careful - always make sure all the required items are present before cooking. I have a friend who doesn't cook at all, and I was house+cat-sitting for her, and trying to make a nice meal for company...and it involved cheese. However, she didn't have a grater. One trip to a friend's place fixed that matter, but otherwise I would have had to get downright creative. [Wink] All in all, it came out well, and my friend was impressed to learn that her kitchen was actually capable of producing food. [Big Grin]

Dragonman,

You could have convinced the cat that the cheese was an expensively upholsterd couch. The cat would have shredded the cheese in no time. [Wink]

CP

--------------------
Free! Free at last!

Posts: 1809 | From: Glacier Melt, USA | Registered: Mar 2002  |  IP: Logged
Xanthine

Solid Nitrozanium SuperFan!
Member # 736

Member Rated:
5
Icon 1 posted October 30, 2005 21:21      Profile for Xanthine     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I like to cook when I'm hungry. Otherwise I don't think about it too much. I'm really not that much of a food person. Some days I just wish I could take a pill or something and then I could skip lunch without any consequences. My mom and my sister, OTOH, love food. They love to eat food, they love to think about food, they love to make food and that's why they both obsess over cooking magazines and carefully plan and choreograph and make holiday dinners. My sister will plan out her meals days in advance. She can tell you about every decent restaurant in a ten block radius. In contrast, I typically don't think about dinner until my tummy growls and I break out intoa sweat, at which point I open up the fridge and start throwing things into a pan.

I do love to bake though. I learned how to make cookies from scratch when I was eight and I've been turning out goodies ever since. I did not, however, learn how to cook until I was 19. It was the summer between freshman and sophomore years in college. I was doing a research internship and living in an apartment. I'd long since mastered the art of ramen but I wanted to eat real food so before I left my mom, the world's best cook, ran me through the basics and gave me some recipes. I bought some cheap shit cookware at Walmart that I need to replace some day and by trial and error I figured it out. It took a while, but I can now make food that I'm not afraid to share with anyone. I don't have a huge repertoire, but I can do variety. All the stuff I make is pretty simple - if it takes more than twenty minutes to prepare I (with one notable exception) won't make it.

The thing I like the best about cooking is how forgiving it is. You can forget an igredient, use the wrong ingredient, miss a step, incubate too long, too short, too hot, too low, not stir enough, and so on and more likely than not the end result will be just fine. In fact, some recipes actually turn out BETTER if you aren't careful about measuring out the ingredients. That isn't the case with biochemistry. Maybe that's why the recipes I've made up don't involve any measuring whatsoever. I can let out all my pent-up sloppiness in the kitchen. [Razz]

--------------------
And it's one, two, three / On the wrong side of the lee / What were you meant for? / What were you meant for?
- The Decemberists

Posts: 7670 | From: the lab | Registered: Mar 2001  |  IP: Logged
CommanderShroom
BlabberMouth, a Blabber Odyssey
Member # 2097

Member Rated:
4
Icon 1 posted October 30, 2005 21:34      Profile for CommanderShroom     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I enjoy cooking sometimes.

Like you I don't have a huge recipe book in my head and I have the habit of throwing a bunch of stuff together and going "Dinner!"

And all the people that I have admired the most for their cooking never used measuring cups. They trusted their taste and instincts. Which generally how I cook. I look around and find things that may be interesting together.

And stainless cookware does rock. Though sometimes I still enjoy cooking a meal in an old cast iron skillet. Something about those things.

--------------------
Does he know our big secret?
Has one of us confessed?
'Bout the wires circuits and motors
Buried in our chest

Posts: 2465 | From: Utarrrrggggghhh!!!!!!!! | Registered: Mar 2003  |  IP: Logged
Colonel Panic
BlabberMouth, the Next Generation
Member # 1200

Icon 1 posted October 30, 2005 21:35      Profile for Colonel Panic         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by YaYawoman:
I'm not going to be able to answer your question. I am one of the sorry kitchen challenged. Some things I can cook, eggs,omelettes, throw it all in a roaster and check it in 3 hrs, other than that.....god bless betty crocker and take-out. The look of fear that crosses my children's faces when I tell them I am going to try to cook something new for dinner is truly priceless. My question for all kitchen divas is-- what is so different about calphalon(SP?)--isn't a pot a pot? What do you have to do different to use it, and does it make much difference? Thanks bye.

YaYa,

The cookware the Bibo shows us appears to be stainless steel. Calphalon makes many different types of cookware, including the anodized aluminum for which they are well known.

The anodization process helps harden the aluminum and make it less reactive to certain foods, but it stains pretty easily in a dishwasher.

Steel is durable. Though it is a bit touchy when searing meats. It also does not transfer heat as quickly as aluminum, a property which makes aluminum popular. Stainless steel is often paired with another metal, like copper to improve heat transfer. Some stainless steel will have aluminum sandwiched into the bottom of the steel, too.


A pot can vary with guage of material, and type of material. Gauge of the metal can improve heat distribution and increase durability.

CP

--------------------
Free! Free at last!

Posts: 1809 | From: Glacier Melt, USA | Registered: Mar 2002  |  IP: Logged
Xanthine

Solid Nitrozanium SuperFan!
Member # 736

Member Rated:
5
Icon 1 posted October 30, 2005 22:03      Profile for Xanthine     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Colonel Panic:
quote:
Originally posted by dragonman97:
/me learned a useful lesson in cooking by being careful - always make sure all the required items are present before cooking. I have a friend who doesn't cook at all, and I was house+cat-sitting for her, and trying to make a nice meal for company...and it involved cheese. However, she didn't have a grater. One trip to a friend's place fixed that matter, but otherwise I would have had to get downright creative. [Wink] All in all, it came out well, and my friend was impressed to learn that her kitchen was actually capable of producing food. [Big Grin]

Dragonman,

You could have convinced the cat that the cheese was an expensively upholsterd couch. The cat would have shredded the cheese in no time. [Wink]

CP

If this is the cat I'm thinking of the most dman would be able to get it to do is sit on the cheese...

--------------------
And it's one, two, three / On the wrong side of the lee / What were you meant for? / What were you meant for?
- The Decemberists

Posts: 7670 | From: the lab | Registered: Mar 2001  |  IP: Logged
Kinguy
Geek
Member # 4527

Member Rated:
5
Icon 1 posted October 30, 2005 22:05      Profile for Kinguy     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 

Posts: 181 | Registered: Oct 2005  |  IP: Logged
dragonman97

SuperFan!
Member # 780

Member Rated:
4
Icon 1 posted October 30, 2005 22:16      Profile for dragonman97   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Kinguy:
Or you just use the cat instead of cheese......

WHAT!?!? DON'T JUDGE ME!

Stay away from me...far, far away...

/me breathes ice in the direction of Kinguy...

--------------------
There are three things you can be sure of in life: Death, taxes, and reading about fake illnesses online...

Posts: 9332 | From: Westchester County, New York | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Kinguy
Geek
Member # 4527

Member Rated:
5
Icon 1 posted October 30, 2005 22:17      Profile for Kinguy     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 

Posts: 181 | Registered: Oct 2005  |  IP: Logged
dragonman97

SuperFan!
Member # 780

Member Rated:
4
Icon 1 posted October 30, 2005 22:23      Profile for dragonman97   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Xanthine:
If this is the cat I'm thinking of the most dman would be able to get it to do is sit on the cheese...

I was going to try and dream up a cunning plan, but honestly, you're right. [Smile] My solution otherwise would have involved a couple of forks, with the tines intertwined somehow.

*sigh* /me misses the 'little' guy...

--------------------
There are three things you can be sure of in life: Death, taxes, and reading about fake illnesses online...

Posts: 9332 | From: Westchester County, New York | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Rhonwyyn

Solid Gold SuperFan!
Member # 2854

Member Rated:
4
Icon 1 posted October 30, 2005 22:32      Profile for Rhonwyyn   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
In those circumstances, dman, just thinly slice the cheese, then tear into small pieces.

CP, may I have your castoff cookware? Please?!

--------------------
Change the way you SEE, not the way you LOOK!

Posts: 3849 | From: Lancaster, PA | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged
Bibo
BlabberMouth, the Next Generation
Member # 1959

Member Rated:
4
Icon 1 posted October 30, 2005 22:37      Profile for Bibo   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Yes the cookware I have is Stainless Steel. It is Sams Club "Members Mark" brand, but looks a lot like the Calphalon pan I bought and makes me wonder if it is actually made by Calphalon. Price wise this set was only $129, where the equivalent runs anywhere from $300 - $500

From Samsclub.com

"Tri-Ply Clad is a premium line of cookware with a pure aluminum core between two layers of 18/10 stainless steel extended all the way up the sidewalls to maximize performance. The result is a superior and more efficient cookware as heat spreads quickly and evenly from every side."

And Calphalon tells you NOT to use aerosol cooking sprays in ANY Calphalon cookware. "Sprays leave a gummy residue that is difficult to remove completely. This residue causes food to stick, even in nonstick cookware"


quote:
Originally posted by Colonel Panic:
The cookware the Bibo shows us appears to be stainless steel. Calphalon makes many different types of cookware, including the anodized aluminum for which they are well known.

The anodization process helps harden the aluminum and make it less reactive to certain foods, but it stains pretty easily in a dishwasher.

Steel is durable. Though it is a bit touchy when searing meats. It also does not transfer heat as quickly as aluminum, a property which makes aluminum popular. Stainless steel is often paired with another metal, like copper to improve heat transfer. Some stainless steel will have aluminum sandwiched into the bottom of the steel, too.


A pot can vary with guage of material, and type of material. Gauge of the metal can improve heat distribution and increase durability.


Posts: 1641 | From: Grand Rapids, MI | Registered: Jan 2003  |  IP: Logged


All times are Eastern Time
This topic comprises 2 pages: 1  2 
 
Post New Topic  New Poll  Post A Reply Close Topic    Move Topic    Delete Topic next oldest topic   next newest topic
 - Printer-friendly view of this topic
Hop To:

Contact Us | Geek Culture Home Page

2015 Geek Culture

Powered by Infopop Corporation
UBB.classicTM 6.4.0



homeGeek CultureWebstoreeCards!Forums!Joy of Tech!AY2K!webcam