homeGeek CultureWebstoreeCards!Forums!Joy of Tech!AY2K!webcam

The Geek Culture Forums


Post New Topic  New Poll  Post A Reply
my profile | directory login | | search | faq | forum home
  next oldest topic   next newest topic
» The Geek Culture Forums   » News, Reviews, Views!   » Our stupid lives   » [angry feelings]

 - UBBFriend: Email this page to someone!    
Author Topic: [angry feelings]
nerdwithnofriends
Uber Geek
Member # 3773

Icon 1 posted June 20, 2005 17:48      Profile for nerdwithnofriends     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
So, I'm going down to florida during the beginning of july for a month to work for a guy I know doing simple IT stuff. I will earn about $1280, not including taxes.

So I was all hyped up and planning to buy a new powerbook. 12'', 80 Gb, 1.25 gig ram (I would install the 1 gig SO-DIMM myself to save money), superdrive, wireless, etc, etc.

My dad had fits when he saw the amount of memory and harddrive space I wanted on that thing. Never mind that the 80 gig is the smallest hd I could get, who needs that kind of space? I replied that I did, since I use about forty right now on my desktop machine, and that's just on the OS X harddrive. My laptop would have to be partitioned between OS X and some flavor of linux.

Very well, he said, why do you need that much memory? Isn't the stock 512 Meg more than enough? No, I replied, 512 megs of memory is not a lot of memory anymore. Hell, my desktop machine (B&W G3 w/ a 500 Mhz G4 upgrade chip) has 704 megs of memory and that barely cuts it.

fine, he says, let's look at the scratch-and-dent page and see what they got. Well, voila, there's my machine, all ready to go, all we need to do is order. Well, my mom had planned to co-sign on a credit card with me so that I could buy the laptop witht that and repay it by myself, thereby establishing a credit history. It was a good plan, right up until the point that she found out there's no way she can co-sign a credit card with a 17 year old.

Basically, this means I won't get a machine till like at least halfway through the school year, even though I have the fundage to pay for it. This really pisses me off, since my machine right now works really hard, but just doesn't make the grade. I need a laptop I can carry around with me if I am to get the most use out of a computer.

My dad suggested selling my current machine on ebay, which is an idea I shot down because at a going rate of about $130, it would be a better idea to make it into a file server using BSD or linux.

erg. I suppose I can start looking at Wintel machines, and then just repartition the machine and make linux my primary OS. The only problem is, I don't know what companies are good for wintel laptops and I don't know how much of a struggle it would be to go to using linux full time for my daily activities, instead of just having it be my experimentation platform.

any suggestions?

--------------------
"The Buddha, the Godhead, resides quite as comfortably in the circuits of a digital computer or the gears of a cycle transmission as he does at the top of a mountain or in the petals of a flower." - Robert M. Pirsig

Posts: 948 | Registered: Mar 2005  |  IP: Logged
alfrin
Uber Geek
Member # 3836

Member Rated:
4
Icon 1 posted June 20, 2005 18:01      Profile for alfrin     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
honestly my best suggestion would be find someone you know (an adult most likely) give them the money and have them buy it. You don't get a credit history but you get the machine

--------------------
Art is Resistance / Resistance is Art

Posts: 813 | From: Nevada, USA | Registered: Apr 2005  |  IP: Logged
Black Widow
Uber Geek
Member # 3046

Icon 1 posted June 20, 2005 18:16      Profile for Black Widow     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Check out a local store, see if they have any returns or slightly used models?

Look on eBay for one?

And don't try to bother explaining to parents about memory and storage requirements, unless they are computer-savvy they won't ever understand.

Posts: 931 | From: Missouri | Registered: Oct 2004  |  IP: Logged
Alien Investor
Highlie
Member # 242

Member Rated:
4
Icon 10 posted June 20, 2005 21:40      Profile for Alien Investor     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
If you're old enough to earn the money, you're old enough to spend it.

Other people's opinions about what kind of computer YOU want are as welcome as you want them to be. Personally, I think the horsepower of the computer is less important than the resourcefulness of the person using it. But my opinion is not important. Buy what makes you happy. Your money == you don't have to justify it to anybody. Your money == you don't have to convince anybody whether the cool kids have 512 MB ram or 2 GB ram. Buy 8 GB if you want it.

If you were buying a motorcycle and your first ride was an 1100 CC monster than your parents would be righly concerned, but a computer? How can you hurt yourself with too much computer?

As far as building a credit score goes, I think that's overrated hype from the credit industry. If you're in USA, get a free copy of your report (either now or in September, depending on where you live). What they care about is bad debt, late payments, delinquincies. No credit == no negatives.

http://www.ftc.gov/bcp/conline/pubs/credit/freereports.htm

Google up on "credit scoring" and "credit reporting" ... it's not that mystical actually. FICO just takes in every bit of information they can find, does king-hell statistics on those bits versus history of whether people actually paid their loans or not, and looks for accurate regression models. It's not a moral judgement of whether you are good or not, it's an empirical back-fit of whether people who have behaved similarly to you actually paid their debts.

But again, it's your credit report, manage it as you please. Although an hour or two of reading will bring surprising things to light.

Whew, enough advice from the old dude. Get your dream comp and love it.

--------------------
"love without fear"

Posts: 627 | From: New York City | Registered: Jan 2000  |  IP: Logged
garlicguy

Member # 3166

Member Rated:
5
Icon 1 posted June 20, 2005 22:12      Profile for garlicguy   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Seems we're kind of quick to give advice to a legal minor here, especially the kind that thwarts the legal and logical authority of his parents.

True, nwnf may not appreciate his father's position in this matter. But then, nwnf is 17 years old, we don't really KNOW him, or his parents.

So maybe before we jump in with a bunch of advice about going around his parents' wishes maybe we should consider:

Which of us agreed 100% with our parents?

Which of us who has, will have or had minor children in the past would appreciate a bunch of relative strangers (adults) giving them sage advice to contradict our wishes? Where is the wisdom in this course?

Maybe we should encourage the lad in how else he might approach his folks before we teach him to burn bridges.

Some months ago a youngster on these forums was asking advice about setting up a business in such a way as to keep his parents from being exposed to liability risks and similar items and how to own the business in his own name. I too quickly offered a solution, which I identified as risky, which really should only have been considered as a desparate, last ditch option. After I posted it, I realized my error and explained that, even in a case such as his, he should still have his parents involvement and agreement at every turn.

My 2 cents, anyway. Perhaps not popular, but perhaps more balanced?

--------------------
I don't know what I was thinking... it seemed like a good idea at the time.

Posts: 3752 | From: Pluto, no matter what you call it, is still my home. | Registered: Dec 2004  |  IP: Logged
Snaggy

Sir Snaggalot!
Member # 123

Member Rated:
5
Icon 5 posted June 20, 2005 22:13      Profile for Snaggy   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
What about making up some kind of written contract with your parents, saying you will pay back the money, so much per month, if they get the computer for you on their card. Forget about the credit rating thing for the time being.
Posts: 8111 | From: Canada | Registered: Jan 2000  |  IP: Logged
Rhonwyyn

Solid Gold SuperFan!
Member # 2854

Member Rated:
4
Icon 1 posted June 20, 2005 22:42      Profile for Rhonwyyn   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Basically, this means I won't get a machine till like at least halfway through the school year, even though I have the fundage to pay for it.
Does that mean you have the cash now? 'Cause if so, give it to your parents in return for the use of their credit card now. That's how my brother and I are working things; he finds what he wants to buy and gives me the cash, then I use my credit card to buy it for him. I earn cashback on my card and he gets the items he needs/wants.

--------------------
Change the way you SEE, not the way you LOOK!

Posts: 3849 | From: Lancaster, PA | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged
drunkennewfiemidget
BlabberMouth, a Blabber Odyssey
Member # 2814

Member Rated:
4
Icon 1 posted June 21, 2005 07:24      Profile for drunkennewfiemidget     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by garlicguy:
Seems we're kind of quick to give advice to a legal minor here, especially the kind that thwarts the legal and logical authority of his parents.

True, nwnf may not appreciate his father's position in this matter. But then, nwnf is 17 years old, we don't really KNOW him, or his parents.

So maybe before we jump in with a bunch of advice about going around his parents' wishes maybe we should consider:

Which of us agreed 100% with our parents?

Which of us who has, will have or had minor children in the past would appreciate a bunch of relative strangers (adults) giving them sage advice to contradict our wishes? Where is the wisdom in this course?

Maybe we should encourage the lad in how else he might approach his folks before we teach him to burn bridges.

Some months ago a youngster on these forums was asking advice about setting up a business in such a way as to keep his parents from being exposed to liability risks and similar items and how to own the business in his own name. I too quickly offered a solution, which I identified as risky, which really should only have been considered as a desparate, last ditch option. After I posted it, I realized my error and explained that, even in a case such as his, he should still have his parents involvement and agreement at every turn.

My 2 cents, anyway. Perhaps not popular, but perhaps more balanced?

All due respect, Mr GG, but I wholeheartedly disgaree.

I am a parent of a 3 year old right now. Maybe not biologically, but in every other way I am. If he had money of his own, it's up to him how he spends it and what he does with it, not me. As someone said before, if he was spending it on an 1100cc motorbike, then his parents are in a place to step in, but on a laptop, he can do with it what he pleases.

His father trying to deter him from particular models or features on a laptop are nothing short of nonsense. The computer world is continuing to move at such a break-neck speed that by the time he gets it, it won't even be that impressive anymore anyway.

Its his money, he can do what he wants with it. He's 17. That's legally old enough to drive in most states/provinces, get health care without parental knowledge and/or consent, and enter into a legally binding contract for necessities (at least in Canada). I think he's old enough to know what he can and cannot do with his own money.

Besides, from what I can tell, his parents were more than willing to help out, but it was the co-sign issue that wouldn't go.

As an aside from all of that, nwnf: if your mother was willing to co-sign, then she was willing to accept fiscal responsibilities for your purchase. If that's the case, forget all about the credit history, as it's not necessary at this point in your life anyway, and just give her the money and ask her to get it on HER card.

Posts: 4897 | From: Cambridge, ON, Canada | Registered: Jun 2004  |  IP: Logged
garlicguy

Member # 3166

Member Rated:
5
Icon 1 posted June 21, 2005 08:09      Profile for garlicguy   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I don't mean to be pedantic, but perhaps my earlier post on this thread was unclear.

The issue I'm attempting to raise is not whether we agreed with nwnf's desire to purchase a laptop with his own money. The issue of focus is rather, who are we, as virtual strangers, to be giving advice to some one else's child when it specifically contradicts the parent's advice, and the parents are unaware of us as advisors?

dnm, you are the parent of a 3 year old. Does that give your neighbors the right to advise the child against yours or his mother's wishes?

As for legal age: Montana USA - while a person might legally obtain a driver's license at age 15 (with parental permission), they cannot enter into contracts, arrange health care, etc. until reaching age 18. Whether we agree with the law is not the issue here either, so long as it is not an unjust law. Obedience to the law would be the higher road in such cases, I think.

Snaggy and Rhonwyyn both offered workable suggestions that would respect the parent's wishes and possibly allow nwnf to purchase his laptop. Your advice in the last paragraph of your post (dnm) was also supportive of all parties. (Yayy you guys!) Personally, I hope he runs with that advice, convinces his parents and gets the machine. That would be a great lesson in negotiating and compromise!

As a final matter of fact, my 17 year old's new Apple iBook, LOADED, with his student discount and special savings coupon cost $1,700 US. It is scheduled to arrive today via FedEx. It was purchased last Friday night on my credit card, by me (he can't legally transact that business). He has the cash and will be paying me in full once the new toys have arrived and we've had a chance to verify their condition. So it turns out that I, too might disagree with nwnf's father's advice. But I respect his authority in his son's life enough not to add to the conflict, either wittingly or unwittingly, if I can avoid it.

Being a parent is not for the faint-hearted, especially as one prepares them to leave the nest. It is a time of turmoil in the best of cases and I merely mean (meant) to suggest that we not exascerbate a difficult situation unnecessarily.

FWIW. [Wink]

--------------------
I don't know what I was thinking... it seemed like a good idea at the time.

Posts: 3752 | From: Pluto, no matter what you call it, is still my home. | Registered: Dec 2004  |  IP: Logged
Grey_girl

Member # 2172

Member Rated:
5
Icon 1 posted June 21, 2005 09:11      Profile for Grey_girl     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Jumping into the conversation as another parent of a teenager, I have to agree with my like-named friend. GG is right. We are in no position to contradict anyone's parents.

I think the parents should be commended, because it sounds like they are trying to teach their son how to make sound financial decisions (I don't know if that's the case, but it might be). Also, NWNF should be commended also, because he's taking responsibility and buying a pricey item with his own hard-earned money, rather than expecting his parents to buy it for him.

NWNF, I hope you get your laptop. Try to work out either of the solutions presented by Snaggy and Rhonwyyn. I know if my son came to me with those compromises, I would allow one or the other.

Posts: 764 | From: NYC | Registered: May 2003  |  IP: Logged
nerdwithnofriends
Uber Geek
Member # 3773

Icon 1 posted June 21, 2005 09:18      Profile for nerdwithnofriends     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Thanks for the advice guys. I'll keep y'all posted.

But GarlicGuy... how did you get a student discount? every time I've looked for one for someone in a missoula public school, it doesn't exist. Hmmm.....

Again, you guys, thanks for the advice. I really appreciate it.

--------------------
"The Buddha, the Godhead, resides quite as comfortably in the circuits of a digital computer or the gears of a cycle transmission as he does at the top of a mountain or in the petals of a flower." - Robert M. Pirsig

Posts: 948 | Registered: Mar 2005  |  IP: Logged
Callipygous
BlabberMouth, a Blabber Odyssey
Member # 2071

Member Rated:
4
Icon 12 posted June 21, 2005 09:25      Profile for Callipygous     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Easy does it NWNF. Don't get too cheerful around here, or you might have to change your name [Wink]

--------------------
"Knowledge is Power. France is Bacon" - Milton

Posts: 2922 | From: Brighton - UK | Registered: Mar 2003  |  IP: Logged
garlicguy

Member # 3166

Member Rated:
5
Icon 1 posted June 21, 2005 09:31      Profile for garlicguy   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by nerdwithnofriends:


But GarlicGuy... how did you get a student discount? every time I've looked for one for someone in a missoula public school, it doesn't exist. Hmmm.....

Will's (our son) discount was offered through the UM Apple representative who works out of the Bookstore on campus. You could go to www.applerockies.com and see if you can qualify there, or you can call the Apple Store in Cupertino and the menu selection includes one for students. I do not know if they still offer discounts for HS students, (in case that applies to you), but Apple did offer such discounts in times past.

Good luck to you!

[Wink]

--------------------
I don't know what I was thinking... it seemed like a good idea at the time.

Posts: 3752 | From: Pluto, no matter what you call it, is still my home. | Registered: Dec 2004  |  IP: Logged
Ugh, MightyClub
BlabberMouth, the Next Generation
Member # 3112

Member Rated:
5
Icon 1 posted June 21, 2005 10:53      Profile for Ugh, MightyClub     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
NWNF -- if you are entering college in the fall as a Freshman you should qualify for Apple's student discount. I believe you just have to show proof of enrollment.

--------------------
Ugh!

Posts: 1742 | From: Ithaca, NY | Registered: Dec 2004  |  IP: Logged
Grey_girl

Member # 2172

Member Rated:
5
Icon 1 posted June 21, 2005 14:45      Profile for Grey_girl     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
You can get the discount right through apple.com. I was able to when I ordered my son's iPod. Go to apple.com and select "Education" on the horizontal menu bar. No proof of enrollment was required when I ordered through the website. They'll also give you the discount at the Apple Store if you go in with a valid id from an educational institution (I work at a college).

(Sorry Allan, I didn't know about this last year when you were here visiting.)

Posts: 764 | From: NYC | Registered: May 2003  |  IP: Logged
Luke Skywalker
Assimilated
Member # 3096

Member Rated:
3
Icon 1 posted June 21, 2005 16:13      Profile for Luke Skywalker     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
First, are you going into college or HS with this? And if u are going in to HS, Id wait, as ure going to pretty much want a new computer for college. Second, if it is for college, most colleges offer discounted computers in their bookstores, or are liased with some computer manufactuers for discounts. Check that.

Second, like someone said, bribe ure parents. You DO NOT need a credit card at 17. Its nice, but ure more than likely to screw ureself over early with credit and debt. I know. Im 18, have thought about it and done the research, and its not worth it.

Third, on Win Models, Dell, HP, Sony, and IBM are all good. Im getting a dell here soon and have nothing but high regards for them. Sony is an up and coming manufacturer in laptops. Ibm is ok, but i know in like 2 years, they have said they are getting out of the laptop business, and wont support their machines after that. Thats a big thing if ure breaks. You want a warrenty on a laptop of atleast 3 years. and if its not supported, ure screwed. But definatly do ure research. Know who offers what, and how ppl like them in follow-up.

Forth, what the hell do you want to do with that much stuff in a laptop? If ure going to game or something, get a desktop. Id reccomend alienware. They are cheep and good for serious gaming. Otherwise, other than maybe the 1gb of ram, you have no use for all that maxxed out stuff. Its a waste of money.

Hope this helps.

--------------------
Use the Force, Luke.

Posts: 406 | From: The Line Between Time and Space | Registered: Nov 2004  |  IP: Logged
dragonman97

SuperFan!
Member # 780

Member Rated:
4
Icon 1 posted June 21, 2005 17:45      Profile for dragonman97   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Grey_girl:
You can get the discount right through apple.com. I was able to when I ordered my son's iPod. Go to apple.com and select "Education" on the horizontal menu bar. No proof of enrollment was required when I ordered through the website. They'll also give you the discount at the Apple Store if you go in with a valid id from an educational institution (I work at a college).

GG,
It's true that you don't need any ID to purchase via the online store - you just select the name of your educational institution, and you're golden. However, I was discussing the matter with one of the Apple store people, and learned that they can audit you at will, so one had better have been a qualifying student/faculty/adminstration/staff member at the time of purchase...

--------------------
There are three things you can be sure of in life: Death, taxes, and reading about fake illnesses online...

Posts: 9332 | From: Westchester County, New York | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Alien Investor
Highlie
Member # 242

Member Rated:
4
Icon 1 posted June 21, 2005 19:03      Profile for Alien Investor     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
[QUOTE]Originally posted by garlicguy:


The issue I'm attempting to raise is not whether we agreed with nwnf's desire to purchase a laptop with his own money. The issue of focus is rather, who are we, as virtual strangers, to be giving advice to some one else's child when it specifically contradicts the parent's advice, and the parents are unaware of us as advisors?


Two strangers nicknamed DMR and BWK gave me plenty of instruction and advice, indirectly, when I was 15, and I have profited greatly from it.

A few days ago, a stranger to most of us here, Steve Jobs, gave a very interesting speech about his positive experience making his own decision to formally drop out of college and use the resources of his college in his own idiosyncratic, unmatriculated way. That's a very large leap for anybody to make, but his speech has been quoted approvingly by many people, including some here.

I don't think of a young man who's about to leave for a different state and work on his own as primarily "someone else's child", but primarily as someone mature enough to make their own decision on the scope of a laptop purchase.

I suppose you and I are different that way.

--------------------
"love without fear"

Posts: 627 | From: New York City | Registered: Jan 2000  |  IP: Logged
garlicguy

Member # 3166

Member Rated:
5
Icon 1 posted June 21, 2005 20:39      Profile for garlicguy   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Alien Investor:
I don't think of a young man who's about to leave for a different state and work on his own as primarily "someone else's child", but primarily as someone mature enough to make their own decision on the scope of a laptop purchase.

There's a nice enough thought. Unfortunately it is not exactly reality based in terms of either the law or common courtesy. That notion raises your opinion above those around you - a trump card so to speak. Is that how you raised your kids? By encouraging casual passers-by to lend their advice? Based on how they FELT? Yikes!

This 17 year-old, by his own admission, is planning on returning "home" to live with his parents. That may be to finish his High School diploma or to begin his college career. But since you, Alien Investor, have decided he is mature enough to purchase a laptop because he is traveling out of state for temporary employment, then his parents, and those here encouraging the exercise of caution with regard to advice-giving should just step aside. Do I have this right?

By the way, it seems he has his parents' permission and blessing for the out-of-state gig, so accusing them of being overly restrictive would be a bit far-fetched wouldn't it? Maybe we should let nwnf's parents do their job and continue to encourage him to deal with them?

quote:
I suppose you and I are different that way.
I'm guessing we agree on this point though. [Wink]
Posts: 3752 | From: Pluto, no matter what you call it, is still my home. | Registered: Dec 2004  |  IP: Logged
Alien Investor
Highlie
Member # 242

Member Rated:
4
Icon 1 posted June 21, 2005 21:57      Profile for Alien Investor     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
[QUOTE]Originally posted by garlicguy:
Do I have this right?

No, actually, you have several things wrong.

First is throwing in strawmen. I haven't suggested that you, or anyone else "step aside". You, not I, have made the suggestion that other people stop expressing their opinions. But then you insinuate I believe that.

Second is attributing my opinions to how I "feel" (your emphasis), and then attacking them on that basis. Wrong. I don't base my opinions on how I "feel", and you will find that I don't write or think that way -- I base my beliefs on thoughts and experience, not whether something feels a certain you.

Third is characterizing people who disagree with you as not "reality-based", not legal, and not courteous. That's not very civil of you.

Maybe we should let nwnf's parents do their job and continue to encourage him to deal with them?

There is no "we" here. There is a "you", who have one opinion about what encouragement to give, and a "me", who has a different opinion. It's you, not me, who promulgates this "we" with a single voice and a single opinion that happens to be your opinion.

Here's my counter-suggestion: maybe we, that is, each of us, should post our sincerely held thoughts and observations, and NerdWithNoFriends and other readers can exercise their own judgement about what they think is right. That's what I think bulletin boards are for.

--------------------
"love without fear"

Posts: 627 | From: New York City | Registered: Jan 2000  |  IP: Logged
garlicguy

Member # 3166

Member Rated:
5
Icon 1 posted June 21, 2005 23:02      Profile for garlicguy   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Alien Investor,

I did not mean to offend nor attack you. Argue yes, attack no. I'm sorry my comments read that way and so I take full responsibility for them.

Certainly, you are entitled to your opinions and to the free expression of them here. I was puzzled that you interpreted my style of argument as presupposing that I have the final say, and no one else gets to chime in. But what that probably means is that I need to be more careful before hitting the send button, and that I need to read my comments more carelfully from the other person's viewpoint. These are both good recommendations for me. Thank you for that.

As for the advice-giving issue...

My real passion in this matter is sparked by my experiences in working with kids, (social work, theraputic teaching, etc.) in which I have seen the after effects of too little parenting in the nuclear families. I guess I've grown quite sensitive and protective toward that effort where it still exists.

So if I've accused you, or someone else here unjustly, then I offer my apology for my remarks.

I readily accept the fact that I may be overstating my case in the eyes of others. But I do not mean to do so at the expense of others nor by unfair means.

Finally, I do not mean to impinge anyone's right to offer advice to anyone else on the boards. Nor do I wish to suggest the curtailment of others rights to read such advice and judge for themselves.

What I really meant to say, is that in my opinion, it may be unwise and it may be discourteous to do so when it might obviously interfere with the workings of a family outside our own. (This is intended as a more proper re-statement. The word "may" should be emphasized.)

I hope not to argue the point further, if I've made clear that which I earlier muddied with my errant tactics. Otherwise, fire away.

'kay?

Sincerely and respectfully,

garlicguy

--------------------
I don't know what I was thinking... it seemed like a good idea at the time.

Posts: 3752 | From: Pluto, no matter what you call it, is still my home. | Registered: Dec 2004  |  IP: Logged
drunkennewfiemidget
BlabberMouth, a Blabber Odyssey
Member # 2814

Member Rated:
4
Icon 1 posted June 22, 2005 05:21      Profile for drunkennewfiemidget     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by garlicguy:
Alien Investor,

... lots of stuff...

garlicguy

I don't think you went too far at all, I think you just gave your opinion.

I also think, with all due respect, Alien Investor took it a little too personally, and maybe isn't used to the regular debates that occur here.

This is the only board on the Internet I've ever taken part in where people can agree to disagree, and move onto other things without hating eachother forever.

Posts: 4897 | From: Cambridge, ON, Canada | Registered: Jun 2004  |  IP: Logged
Alien Investor
Highlie
Member # 242

Member Rated:
4
Icon 7 posted June 23, 2005 15:48      Profile for Alien Investor     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Garlic Guy,

I am happy to bury the hatchet.

I'm all for a feisty argument, even -- especially when -- it's about something important.

I spent today at Coney Island so I am a bit more mellow this evening.

-- AI

--------------------
"love without fear"

Posts: 627 | From: New York City | Registered: Jan 2000  |  IP: Logged


All times are Eastern Time  
Post New Topic  New Poll  Post A Reply Close Topic    Move Topic    Delete Topic next oldest topic   next newest topic
 - Printer-friendly view of this topic
Hop To:

Contact Us | Geek Culture Home Page

2015 Geek Culture

Powered by Infopop Corporation
UBB.classicTM 6.4.0



homeGeek CultureWebstoreeCards!Forums!Joy of Tech!AY2K!webcam