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Author Topic: About Scholar Novels
Stereo

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Icon 1 posted November 27, 2006 11:57      Profile for Stereo     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
(Can't seem to put my brain in gear today... [blush] )

Ok, So reading on another forum about the Da Vinci Code, I couldn't help but think about way better books I have read since. There are two in the similar vein I can think of from the top of my head.

The first one is The Rule of Four. Two friends are getting engrossed in solving the mystery of an old and well studied book. Very well written, has its historical facts well grounded, not much physical action but a lot of thinking. A very geeky reading. BTW, while searching for a link, I found an flash game based on the book. For cryptography lovers first! (I got stumped pretty early - I have found the cypher, and the result made sense, but the game still told me it is wrong, and I couldn't find the error...)

The second, Imprimatur , by Monaldi and Sorti doesn't seems to be translated in English (yet?). The plague may have hit an hotel, and everyone inside get quanrantined. But it really was a murder, and solving it requires delving into the complexity of the Renaissance politics. Plus, the writers managed to keep a final, unexpected (at least, it was to me, although some clues were left here and there) twist. Great with historical details, its main drawback is... it's so looooooong! Almost 1000 pages, more than half of them historical explanations. (But still a better read than the two Dan Brown's novels I have read.) Oh, and there is mention of a divination stating that the current pope would be Antechrist... Believe what you want! [Big Grin]

Any of you have read those? Or want to propose other titles?

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Eppur, si muove!

Galileo Galilei

Posts: 2289 | From: Gatineau, Quebec, Canada | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
spungo
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Icon 1 posted November 27, 2006 16:10      Profile for spungo     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
The Name of the Rose?

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Shameless plug. (Please forgive me.)

Posts: 6529 | From: Noba Scoba | Registered: Jan 2002  |  IP: Logged
Sxeptomaniac

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Icon 1 posted November 27, 2006 16:30      Profile for Sxeptomaniac   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by spungo:
The Name of the Rose?

That was a good book.

Perhaps Douglas Preston & Lincoln Child's books would fit. I really enjoyed The Relic and Reliquary. Of course, I really don't know how to categorize "scholar novels", and I haven't even gotten around to reading The DaVinci Code yet.

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Let's pray that the human race never escapes from Earth to spread its iniquity elsewhere. - C. S. Lewis

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maximile

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Icon 1 posted November 27, 2006 16:53      Profile for maximile   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Recently I've fallen in love with Neil Gaiman's books, so I haven't read anything that would fit in here. When I do, I'll be sure to post about it.

But you know, I quite liked The Da Vinci Code. The bad writing made me uncomfortable, but the story nearly made up for it. Like the Harry Potter books - you just have to read them as quickly as you can. Or watch the film, I guess.

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Serenak

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Icon 1 posted November 27, 2006 17:01      Profile for Serenak     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
FWIW the great Sir Issac Newton spent alot of time analysing the Bible in search of hidden codes and found nothing... OK he didn't have access to modern data processing but overall if he found nothing?

I bet you can take any long book, LoTR woud be good, if nowhere near as long as the Bible (obviously) and run those "Bible Secret" type analytics and get something

As Jasper Carrott once had it... "I played my Beatles album backwards once and there was a message in it - YOU ARE KNACKERING YOUR STYLUS!"

[Big Grin]

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"So if you want my address - it's No. 1 at the end of the bar, where I sit with the broken angels, clutching at straws and nursing my scars..."

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Stereo

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Icon 1 posted November 28, 2006 12:37      Profile for Stereo     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Spungo: the Name of the Rose is already on my list. I've seen part of the movie a long time ago, and learned it was from a novel years later. I think it's time I fill that gap in my culture.

Sxepto: I'd qualify a scholar novel as a novel that makes you feel like one (scholar, not novel, you silly! [crazy] ), or at least smarter than you were before, when you finish it. (I'll also look into your suggestion soon.)

Maximile: Neil Gaiman? I've tried one of his work some times ago, but I didn't quite caught on. (Sandman is from him, right?) Maybe I should give him a second try. As far as graphic novels from the States goes, I pretty much fell in love with Ted Naifeh's work. Courtney Crumrin is a pure gem, and Polly's looking good so far. I'll have to try and find his earlier works, too.

Serenak: yeah, it's the story of the infinite number of monkey with infinite time. Statistically, if a work is long enough, there is a cryptographic key that will produce a message. Knowing the number of possibility for cryptography is close to infinity (well, that's the whole point, ain't it?), the closer the text is to infinity, the greater the chance a message can be decrypted. But I won't be the one trying - I prefer to enjoy the story itself!

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Eppur, si muove!

Galileo Galilei

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Metasquares
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Icon 1 posted November 28, 2006 13:16      Profile for Metasquares   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Godel, Escher, Bach, of course.
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Black Widow
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Icon 1 posted November 28, 2006 13:26      Profile for Black Widow     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Metasquares:
Godel, Escher, Bach, of course.

Gesundheit.
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Metasquares
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Icon 1 posted November 28, 2006 15:38      Profile for Metasquares   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
And that was without the umlaut [Smile]
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The Famous Druid

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Icon 1 posted November 28, 2006 17:37      Profile for The Famous Druid     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Well, an excellent book about a scholar is 'The Doomsday Book' by Connie Willis.

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If you watch 'The History Of NASA' backwards, it's about a space agency that has no manned spaceflight capability, then does low-orbit flights, then lands on the Moon.

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Black Widow
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Icon 1 posted November 28, 2006 18:27      Profile for Black Widow     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Why do I feel like this answer is all wrong (but I'm going to give it anyway)?

The Historian by Elizabeth Kostova.

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MacMandoGal
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Icon 1 posted November 28, 2006 18:57      Profile for MacMandoGal     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Black Widow:
Why do I feel like this answer is all wrong (but I'm going to give it anyway)?

The Historian by Elizabeth Kostova.

I liked that one! Unique take on the Dracula story.

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MMG

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MacMandoGal
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Icon 1 posted November 28, 2006 19:00      Profile for MacMandoGal     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Here's mine, but the heroine is a computer scientist.

The Eight, by Katherine Neville.

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MMG

Posts: 30 | From: Minneapolis | Registered: Nov 2006  |  IP: Logged


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