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Author Topic: What do you think about Steve Jobs?
Eric-Ofcourse
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Member # 12035

Icon 6 posted November 22, 2007 08:29      Profile for Eric-Ofcourse     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Hi All.

What do you think about Steve Jobs, the CEO of Apple? What do you think about his philosophy and management style, if you are acquainted with it?

Steve Jobs Wiki Entry

His view and approach have great appeal for me, but I wonder to what extent the spirit of creativity and do-what-you-love entrepreneurship are really feasible in the real business world. When Steve began taking serious risks he already had a multi-million dollar success story (Apple II) to back him up.

I recently saw a documentary that showed that, for every successful American rapper, like Puff Daddy or Notorious BIG, there were hundreds of wanna-be rappers living in the ghettos. They put great energy into developing a hip and clever nickname like Ill Fiver or Hypochromous B, or whatever (I just made those up). These guys work dayjobs as janitors, or just sell drugs or "hustle" while waiting to make it big in the rap industry. But of course they never make it. And they are legion.

But not every business situation is Microcomputing in Palo Alto California, 1979. Would Jobs have succeeded in other business climates, or even in any other business climate, acting as he did? Are hundreds of would-be imitators hoodwinked by "I made it up from nothing, and you can too" stories, as in the case of rappers and tech entrepreneuers? It seems the advantage in both these respective fields accrues to those who were there at the outset, before the respective areas "went big". What do you think?

Posts: 12 | Registered: Oct 2007  |  IP: Logged
Serenak

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Icon 1 posted November 22, 2007 08:37      Profile for Serenak     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I think I don't want to be writing someone's homework assignment - at 40+ I am a bit old for that...

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Ashitaka

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Icon 1 posted November 22, 2007 09:52      Profile for Ashitaka     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I know nothing of Jobs managment style other than the use of black shirts.


As for the comments on success, this is a very compicated subject.

People tend, I think, to believe that people who were successful in the pasta re more likely to be successful in the future. This gives these people an advantage of capitol, if they have a new idea. I do not believe that a successful past indicates a sucessful future. One has to look at why that person was sucessful. Was it pecause that person is brilliant, or becuase that person was lucky, or a combination of both.

TO ask if JObs would have been successful had he gone into something else than computers is useless. One will never know. A better question would be to ask "If I implement Jobs management style in what I do, will I be successful?"

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Callipygous
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Icon 1 posted November 22, 2007 10:16      Profile for Callipygous     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I would not like to meet Steve Jobs, after Fake Steve the reality couldn't fail to be disappointing. [Smile]

I all seriousness, he is a "Great Man", which means that his faults are also larger than life, though not larger than his virtues. Though he often talks big it is true that he has actually changed the world. The secrets of his success cannot be easily distilled into a series of pat little nostrums, though I think you are not fair in characterising them as not occurring in the "real business world", whatever that might be. A dollar is a dollar wherever you earn it. There are no recipes for business success, other than common sense ones. If you want to know more, read his own reflections on his life and success contained in his 2005 Stanford commencement address.

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Posts: 2922 | From: Brighton - UK | Registered: Mar 2003  |  IP: Logged
Eric-Ofcourse
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Icon 1 posted November 22, 2007 11:45      Profile for Eric-Ofcourse     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Callipygous:

I all seriousness, he is a "Great Man", which means that his faults are also larger than life, though not larger than his virtues. Though he often talks big it is true that he has actually changed the world. The secrets of his success cannot be easily distilled into a series of pat little nostrums, though I think you are not fair in characterising them as not occurring in the "real business world", whatever that might be. A dollar is a dollar wherever you earn it.

Yes, he is a great man, thats also the impression I get. I suppose my musings were too unfocused to yield any great insight– the discussion faulters on a few points as you've indicated.

The Stanford address was really interesting, thanks for pointing that out to me!

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joliet_jane
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Icon 1 posted November 24, 2007 13:00      Profile for joliet_jane     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I've read many books and articles about Steve (an obessive amount). I've found that what other people have to say about him is most valuable, but there's more info on Steve before he took over Apple than there is for the Steve after. And I can sort of tell that he changed a little bit in that time.

Steve is fascinating because he's complicated. Sometimes he's evil, sometimes good. This video clip explains exactly what I mean: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q9tDwLA0cTk

That's from Robert X Cringely's Triumph of the Nerds. Do everything you can to find it-- it's invaluable.

Basically, Steve exploited other people to get to the top, including his best friends. He is a true narcissist and is just plain mean. However, his ability to control and motivate makes big things happen. Things that couldn't happen without him.

...And he's also the sexiest entrepreneur of all time. And that's what's important! [Wink]

quote:
Originally posted by Serenak:
I think I don't want to be writing someone's homework assignment - at 40+ I am a bit old for that...

I did write about Steve for a homework assignment once! Mostly because I had already done so much research. [Smile]

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