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Author Topic: Freelance Web Development
macwoman
Alpha Geek
Member # 821

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Icon 5 posted December 16, 2003 05:56      Profile for macwoman   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Hi all,

I have the opportunity to do some freelance web development for a small recruiting firm. I have lots of web development experience, but everything I've done has been either while working somewhere, while in school, or just my own personal stuff. I need to get an idea of what to charge. This won't be just a static site, but it won't be heavily complex either... a simple database of job openings with the ability to search by only a few criteria (location and date) and a web interface for adding new jobs.

I'll be checking around online to get an idea of rates too, but sometimes it can be hard to find people's rates... so I thought if any of you have done freelance web development you could tell me how much you charge. Also, in your opinion, is it better to charge a flat fee based on the scope of the project, or charge by the hour? And should I charge some kind of maintenance fee if the clients want changes made in the future?

Thanks... and feel free to email me at amber @ tangerinecs.com

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Amber L. Rhea
amberrhea (at) sbcglobal (dot) net
For great justice

Posts: 260 | From: Plano, TX USA | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
Super Flippy

SuperFan!
Member # 1101

Member Rated:
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Icon 1 posted December 16, 2003 07:12      Profile for Super Flippy   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
I've been doing freelance web development for a few years, and here's how I've finally figured out what to charge.

First, figure out what you'd be paid as a salary if this were a regular full-time job. What does that come out to per hour? Add 40-50% for overhead. That gives you a ballpark figure for how much to bill per hour. You may want to break it down by task, charging more for programming and less for maintenance, for example.

It's good to give your client a price for what the whole thing will cost. Break the project down by task, figure out how long each task will take (pad by a little because it always takes longer than you think), and multiply that number by the amount you want to charge per hour. Stipulate that anything above and beyond what's included in the fixed price will be billed on an hourly basis (e.g. ongoing maintenance).

Good luck!

Posts: 337 | From: South Carolina | Registered: Jan 2002  |  IP: Logged
macwoman
Alpha Geek
Member # 821

Member Rated:
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Icon 1 posted December 16, 2003 15:03      Profile for macwoman   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
quote:
Originally posted by Super Flippy:
It's good to give your client a price for what the whole thing will cost. Break the project down by task, figure out how long each task will take (pad by a little because it always takes longer than you think), and multiply that number by the amount you want to charge per hour.

Can you give me an actual *number* estimate? Just a ballpark starting point... email me if you want.

In grad school we did full-life-cycle development projects for clients, and at the end of the whole thing our professors estimated what the cost would have been for the clients if they'd gone to "professionals" for the services... our project came out at about $25,000, which seemed a bit steep to me, but then what do I know...

Thanks...

Posts: 260 | From: Plano, TX USA | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
NetwerkGuy
Geek Apprentice
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Icon 1 posted December 16, 2003 15:08      Profile for NetwerkGuy     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Check this website out http://www.sitepoint.com/article/670/2 it gives you some actual numbers to work with and an idea of what to charge along with many other aspects of starting Freelance Web Design.. it's a 3 section article and guide.

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If A is a success in life, then A equals x plus y plus z. Work is x; y is play; and z is keeping your mouth shut. -- Albert Einstein

Posts: 49 | From: /dev/null | Registered: Dec 2003  |  IP: Logged
macwoman
Alpha Geek
Member # 821

Member Rated:
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Icon 7 posted December 16, 2003 19:30      Profile for macwoman   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Thanks for the tip, that's a good site, it gave me some good ideas.
Posts: 260 | From: Plano, TX USA | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
addiew
Uber Geek
Member # 2140

Member Rated:
5
Icon 1 posted December 18, 2003 22:52      Profile for addiew   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Ive been having a similar problem as I get more and more clients-- thats a good site, thanks!

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My LiveJournal|homepage- shameless, I know

Posts: 823 | From: Oregon | Registered: Apr 2003  |  IP: Logged


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