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Author Topic: Two Wheels Good, Four Wheels Bad
maybe.logic
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Icon 1 posted July 10, 2006 11:33      Profile for maybe.logic     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Challenging the Auto-Dependent Lifestyle

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By Mickey Z.

Is riding a bike the most revolutionary thing you can do?

Here’s a sentence you don’t expect to read on the CNN website: “As gas prices climb to record highs, more Americans seem to be abandoning their cars and biking to work to save money at the pump.” Thus, in the same way Mad Cow fears spurred new interest in vegetarianism, the current gas crisis may inadvertently deliver something else the planet really needs: less cars, more bikes. But bikers beware: this is an uphill battle.

Ken Coughlin, a board member of Transportation Alternatives (TA), a 5500-member NYC-area non-profit citizens group working for “better bicycling, walking and public transit, and fewer cars,” says: “New York’s streets and most streets elsewhere in the country are ruled by the automobile, and bikes are at best an afterthought. Everyone knows this-drivers, cyclists, pedestrians.”

Indeed, the automobile and the lifestyle it inspires have risen to prominence through the power of relentless suggestion. There’s nothing delicate about car commercials and car toys and the hundreds of songs and movies that venerate the irrefutable gratification of owning an internal combustion engine of your very own. It doesn’t even register when a movie character hops into a car and screeches away from the curb. We no longer consciously acknowledge the presence of cars on the street, the highway, and in driveways from coast-to-coast…not to mention the de-funded public transportation and the carchitecture: the myriad structures that exist exclusively to nourish the car culture, e.g. the highway, on-ramp, off-ramp, gas station, strip mall, car wash, auto repair shop, car rental establishment, bridges, tunnels, and, of course, the suburbs.

Coughlin and TA are part of a growing movement that is challenging the auto-dependant lifestyle. One example is their high profile effort to create a “car-free Central Park,” which has mobilized a broad coalition in the Big Apple. Coughlin calls that campaign, “the most perfect symbol of our society’s totally skewed transportation policies.”

Recently, I asked Ken a few questions via e-mail. (His views are his own and do not necessarily reflect those of Transportation Alternatives.)

“Mickey Z:* In light of rising gas costs, one might imagine motorists reconsidering their driving habits. Do you see any indication that the price of oil could result in more people riding bikes?

Ken Coughlin: The New York Times had a front-page article the other day about lower-income people in Florida suddenly unable to afford to drive. Some had switched to mass transit, such as it is down there, and at least one is now riding a bike. It’ll be the young and the poor switching first, but glimmerings of a shift toward biking in the overall zeitgeist can be detected all over. This week’s New Yorker includes a “Goings on About Town” item on Bike Month NYC that declares that ”[w]ith gas prices hitting eye-popping highs, [the numbers of cyclists]might rise even more . . . ” But here in NYC, you won’t be able to say that bicycling has been officially embraced as an alternative until the city stops arresting or ticketing people for the “crime” of riding a bike, which is happening now.

MZ: It’s illegal to ride a bike in NYC? Says who?

KC: The NYPD. They will arrest or ticket you if you happen to be caught riding in a group on one particular Friday evening each month, and on any other day they often hand out nuisance tickets to cyclists for small things like not having a bell or a headlight. Or they will wait for a cyclist to run a series of lights and then write separate tickets for each light, with the total adding up to $500 or more. The cops will claim they are doing this for the cyclist’s own good, but this happened recently to a cyclist who went through reds on Riverside Drive, which has no crossing traffic. It has the result of discouraging cycling as an alternative form of transportation. On the other hand, when was the last time you saw a cop pulling a cyclist over for doing something truly dangerous like speeding down a sidewalk or riding against traffic on a one-way street? My impression is that commuting cyclists are bearing the brunt of the public’s anger against delivery people.

MZ: What steps have activists and groups like TA taken to fight such unfair treatment?

KC: TA repeatedly calls on the NYPD and the administration to stop nuisance ticketing and to focus on real threats to safety like motorists speeding, running red-lights, and other dangerous, law-breaking behavior. At the same time, we can’t defend the actions of cyclists who flagrantly violate laws and intimidate pedestrians; they harm the cycling movement as much as anyone.

MZ: Such important efforts may sound Quixotic to some, but I understand there’s a victory brewing on the “Car-Free Central Park” front. Can you tell us more?

KC: City Council members Gale Brewer and John Liu have introduced a bill, Intro. 276, mandating a car-free summer in Central Park from June 24 to September 24, 2006, as well as car-free afternoons in Prospect Park during the same period. On May 8, the day before the Council Transportation Committee’s scheduled hearing on the bill, Mayor Bloomberg announced a six-month pilot plan to ban traffic from portions of Central Park’s loop road that are already little used by cars. As of Monday June 5, 2006, vehicles will no longer be allowed on Central Park’s East Drive north of 72nd Street in the morning or anywhere (apparently) on the West Drive in the afternoon. (In addition, Prospect Park’s West Drive will be closed to traffic in the mornings.)

MZ: Why do you think would Bloomberg propose this now?

KC: It was clearly an effort to drain support from the Council bill by giving car-free supporters something while maintaining the loop road as a traffic artery. Whether this strategy will succeed remains to be seen. While any reduction in car usage is welcome, most of the loop road will continue to be flooded with cars during prime recreational hours. Worse, recreational users who may believe they are exercising in a totally car-free park will suddenly encounter traffic, perhaps with disastrous consequences. The administration is now boasting that the loop road is free of traffic “75 percent of the time.” We don’t know how they arrived at this figure. Between prime recreational hours of 7 am and 7 pm, the loop road is entirely free of traffic exactly 0 percent of the time. Considering that the park is officially closed from 1 am until 6 am, even under the new rules the loop will be entirely free of traffic for only seven hours — from 7 pm to 1 am and from 6 am to 7 am (assuming the entrances are opened and closed on time).

MZ: How did Bloomberg’s strategy impact the Council?

KC: The Council hearing went forward as planned the following day. The Transportation Committee, chaired by Liu, first heard from Transportation Commissioner Iris Weinshall. Although Weinshall had stood alongside the mayor the day before and said that “people come to New York City’s parks to get away from the hustle and bustle of urban life,” at the hearing she declared that Central Park’s loop road was an “essential traffic artery” and that its closing would cause “significant” disruption. Pressed by Council member Daniel Garodnick for a definition of “significant,” Weinshall and First Deputy Commissioner Michael Primeggia offered only more vague portents of traffic tie-ups.

MZ: On the surface, it seems safe to assume that closing the park off to cars would increase traffic elsewhere. How was this assumption challenged?

KC: Weinshall and Primeggia were followed by a panel of three independent traffic experts who believe that closing the Central Park loop road to traffic will lead to an overall reduction in traffic on city streets. Under questioning from Garodnick, consultant Bruce Schaller said that “shrinkage”-the percentage of cars now using the park that would effectively disappear from the street grid if Central Park were closed-could reach 100 percent. Schaller said that the Department of Transportation’s assumption of 15 percent shrinkage was too pessimistic. Other witnesses speaking in favor of the bill included Columbia University professor Patrick L. Kinney, an expert on the human health effects of air pollution. Noting that fine particles from car exhaust can lodge deep in the lungs and cause lung cancer, heart disease and asthma, Kinney said, “moving traffic off of the park loop roads will significantly reduce health risks for people using the park, especially those exercising along the loop roads.”

MZ: I appreciate the health benefits but I still don’t understand how the “shrinkage” works.

KC: People make the mistake of viewing traffic as some unvarying physical force that, like water, must find somewhere to go. To the contrary, it is the product of thousands of individual decisions by thousands of drivers and passengers. Studies of road closings around the world have shown that much of the traffic that formerly used the closed road miraculously disappears, and that a higher percentage of traffic vanishes when alternative transportation options are plentiful. How can traffic “disappear”? It’s simple: drivers elect to use an alternative mode of transportation, to drive at a different time or on a significantly different route, or to share a vehicle with someone else.

The reality that traffic is elastic gives us hope that something can be done about our currently nightmarish traffic. Otherwise, there is no hope. Given their current mindset that meaningful shrinkage is impossible, all that the traffic engineers at the New York City Department of Transportation can offer us is more of the same. Until they embrace the idea that people can be coaxed from their cars, and that it’s good public policy to do this, very little real change will take place on our streets. Cars will dominate, some 150 to 200 pedestrians and cyclists will die each year, thousands of New Yorkers will succumb to premature deaths because of pollution, and our overall quality of life will continue to be degraded in subtle but profound ways.

MZ: So what was the outcome of the hearing?

KC: The committee’s stance on the bill was hard to read. We know that Liu and Brewer are 100 percent behind Intro. 276. At a press conference prior to the hearing, both spoke strongly in favor of it, as did Brooklyn Council member Bill de Blasio and Manhattan Borough President Scott Stringer, whose latest newsletter to Manhattan residents twice mentions his support of a car-free Central Park. We believe Intro. 276 also has the support of East Side Council members Garodnick, Jessica Lappin and Melissa Mark Viverito. The big question mark is Council Speaker Christine Quinn, who may hold the key to not only the bill’s passage but its passing with enough votes to overcome an almost certain mayoral veto. Quinn has not yet made her position known. It is likely that the Transportation Committee will vote on Intro. 276 in late May, and, assuming it passes, a full Council vote will come shortly thereafter.

MZ: To wrap up, I have to ask this: What’s your response to those who say things will never change because the automobile is too entrenched in our society? How do you reach someone who believes we can’t live without our cars?

KC: A society so reliant on cars is already being revealed as destructive to the planet, and it will soon become completely unsustainable. Our auto-centric lifestyle of the past century has been fueled by cheap and reliable sources of oil. When those sources start to dry up, many are going to have to figure out other ways to live, and the dislocations could be profound and painful. And even if by some miracle the equivalent of another Saudi oil field is suddenly discovered, we’ll still have to dramatically cut back on car use to halt the progression of global warming. So history is moving in our direction.

via Vancouver Indymedia

Critical Mass Vacouver
Transportation Alternatives
Bikesexual.org: Dedicated to the propagation and reproduction of humans on bycycles
Dinosaurs against fossil fuels

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N9IWP
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Icon 1 posted July 10, 2006 12:38      Profile for N9IWP     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I bike to work 1 / week (WX permitting)
I bike some bit in my small home city, then about 3 miles on a busy hiway (but with wide sholders)
I cross the Mississipi on the sidewalk
A little ways on low traffic roads, through a park, and then 3-4 miles on a paved recreation trail. A little more on the sidewalk, cross a busy road (stoplights), and then a bike lane
and then 2 blocks on not very busy roads.
About 10 miles total.

Note that when I use the sidewalk bikes are directed to do so.

The only hard part is on the way home there is a bridge over RR tracks with no sholder / sidewalk on the right side. I usally stop before the bridge, wait for an opening, and then proceed post haste over the bridge.

Brian

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Xanthine

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Icon 1 posted July 10, 2006 13:54      Profile for Xanthine     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I bike all over the place in just about any kind of weather, but I live in town and Boulder's got bike lanes and bike paths all over the place. This might be why everyone who rides bikes long enough will have an unpleasant run in with a car...

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And it's one, two, three / On the wrong side of the lee / What were you meant for? / What were you meant for?
- The Decemberists

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Colonel Panic
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Icon 1 posted July 10, 2006 18:32      Profile for Colonel Panic         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I ride 50 miles a week as a commuter. 2.5 miles to and from, ditto for lunch.

Then I go ride some more just for fun.

I'm aware of cyclists who carry firearms when they ride; they have permits to do so.

I recall an incident where a motorist got out of his vehicle (a dumb thing to do), to continue his assault on a cyclist, only the cyclist had a gun, a badge and handcuffs. The man went to jail.

[Applause]

I have lost seven friends to bicycle/automobile accidents.

I believe a weighted system of traffic liability should be enacted, where damages are multiplied by the ratio of weights of the vehicles involved. An 8,000 pound SUV hits a 20 pound bicycle, then punitive damages will be levied on the SUV by a multiplier of 400.

An additional 10X multiplier is added for drinking and driving, or cell phone yakking and driving.

I find it absoluetly mind-boggling that the car-driving nincompoops in this nation have to waste gasoline to drive their behemoths to work, then have to spend an extra $50 to $100 to work the fat off and the flab into shape at a "health club."

If there truly were a God, and America were indeed a just nation, then we would now have an SUV-driver draft. And we'd drop every one of those gas-sucking SOBs by parachute into the Sunni triangle in Iraq -- all while they were wrapped in the US flag, and with a "W" sticker slapped to their butts.

We could sell the videos of what happened to the jerks on e-bay and pay off the national debt, and still have enough left over for slave reparations.

I've been riding seriously for over 30 years. I've averaged 3 automobile assaults for every 100 miles ridden. By a stunning and overwhelming majority, the individuals who assault with their autos are conservative so-called "Christians." Wearing your so-called "God" on your back bumper only identifies you as the godforsaken, hell-bound hypocrite that you really are.

I've attended too many funerals. There is no forgiveness to those who use an automobile to commit violent crimes.

Hell, I've run out of cheeks to turn with those bastards.

CP

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Free! Free at last!

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TheMoMan
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Icon 1 posted July 11, 2006 04:27      Profile for TheMoMan         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Colonel Panic_______________I was at a last ride service yesterday. Some one in our crowd had heard about this service and we got it done.


http://www.tombstonehearse.com/home.htm

Now you would have to have known Duff to really appreciate this total Biker last ride. As we were coming out of the Funeral parlor a hawk was circling the parking lot, letting loose with a plaintive call. Fast forward twenty miles to the cemetery, a Hawk circled again with a really plaintive cry, even the sparrows left it alone, it landed in a tall pine about fifty yards from the gravesite and called out its wail all through the grave side service

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Those who would give up essential liberty to purchase a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety.


Benjamin Franklin,

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canadiangeek
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Icon 1 posted July 11, 2006 05:29      Profile for canadiangeek     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Colonel Panic:

I recall an incident where a motorist got out of his vehicle (a dumb thing to do), to continue his assault on a cyclist, only the cyclist had a gun, a badge and handcuffs. The man went to jail.


The Halifax police force has a fully-staffed bicycle department, they patrol downtown, and the parks throughout the city on some fairly nice mountain bikes. We also have motorcycle police, and the ever-popular horse-riding kind. (Yes, that's city police, not RCMP)

I must say that bicycle riding has become HUGELY popular with alot of the people that I know, especially since hybrid bikes have become more accessable.

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-whenever you build something that's idiotproof, someone comes out with a better idiot-

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maybe.logic
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Icon 1 posted July 11, 2006 08:10      Profile for maybe.logic     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
And they are much easier to get around when in large towns and cities.

I can compleatly understand the reason why people in rural areas need motorvechicles.

But with the prices of petrol around 95p to £1 per litre, you can see why alot of people are forced to find alternative mehods of transport.

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drunkennewfiemidget
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Icon 1 posted July 11, 2006 09:54      Profile for drunkennewfiemidget     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by maybe.logic:
And they are much easier to get around when in large towns and cities.

I can compleatly understand the reason why people in rural areas need motorvechicles.

But with the prices of petrol around 95p to £1 per litre, you can see why alot of people are forced to find alternative mehods of transport.

That's what confused the hell out of me -- when I was in NY last weekend, I put half a tank of premium gas in my car. $19 USD. In Canada, before heading down, I put half a tank of premium gas in my car. $35 CAD. And we're 1 hour from the American border!

And Americans complain. I know us Canadians have it good compared to the Europeans.

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Cap'n Vic

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Icon 1 posted July 11, 2006 13:42      Profile for Cap'n Vic     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by drunkennewfiemidget:
And Americans complain. I know us Canadians have it good compared to the Europeans. [/QB]

Yabbut, Europe is like, the size of PEI
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maybe.logic
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Icon 8 posted July 12, 2006 01:42      Profile for maybe.logic     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Cap'n Vic:
quote:
Originally posted by drunkennewfiemidget:
And Americans complain. I know us Canadians have it good compared to the Europeans.

Yabbut, Europe is like, the size of PEI [/QB]
Then why do we get ridiculous petrol prices, surley the thriving Americans should pay more... [Mad]
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schnurren
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Icon 1 posted July 12, 2006 11:42      Profile for schnurren     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
That's a fantastic picture of SF critical mass.

I ride my bike to the train station, take the commuter rail for half an hour, then bike from my commuter rail stop to work.

My ride kicks ass. I ride through MIT, down Charles Street (the Cheers-like tourist-loved pretty place) through the park and through Chinatown.

What I find ironic is when I see an SUV with a "save the planet" bumper sticker. It's tempting to knock on the car window and say "I'm doing my part. Now it's your turn"

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quantumfluff
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Icon 1 posted July 12, 2006 21:28      Profile for quantumfluff     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Three wheels - Best!
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nerdwithnofriends
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Icon 1 posted July 13, 2006 00:31      Profile for nerdwithnofriends     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I drive.

While I've nothing against bikers, and in fact encourage the use of bicycles- our city is very bicycle-friendly- the one thing that really grinds my gears is bikes acting like pedestrians; we have bike lanes in the street, bicyclists who use them are to obey the traffic signs and act as a normal vehicle. They are not supposed to hop up onto the sidewalk, hit the crosswalk button, and wait for the light to cross while the rest of us wait.

Here, bicyclists are ticketed for traffic violations (too much time in an automobile lane, etc), as it should be. People who drive cars should not be penalized for being able to afford doing so. Bicycles stay in their lane, I'll stay in mine, and we'll all be happy. If either of us decides to be an ass and violate the boundaries of our lanes, thereby resulting in damage/injury/death to the other, then the offender should be punished to the full extent of the law. Bicycles should receive no special treatment; the only reason they have their own lane is to keep them from slowing traffic.

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"The Buddha, the Godhead, resides quite as comfortably in the circuits of a digital computer or the gears of a cycle transmission as he does at the top of a mountain or in the petals of a flower." - Robert M. Pirsig

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maybe.logic
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Icon 1 posted July 13, 2006 00:34      Profile for maybe.logic     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by schnurren:
It's tempting to knock on the car window and say "I'm doing my part. Now it's your turn"

And then he turns his wheel toward you and knocks you off you're kick-ass bike, ah the advantages of a suv... [Razz] .

But yes a very good point, I call them snobs, people that like to act as though they are doing something for the enviroment/good of mankind, but in reality just to impress their peers. And the truth behind there "enviromental campaigns" is that they actully dont give a sh[t about the enviroment or the earth... that is the irony you speak of, at least here in england.

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Elvermere
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Icon 1 posted July 14, 2006 08:09      Profile for Elvermere     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Interesting discussion. I'm all pro biking as much as possible and used to ride to work. However these things change when you get a family. Once you have children the only really possible way to get through their childhood IS to have a car and to use it.

Here in West Australia the petrol price is about A$1.35 per litre. That's about 50% more than it was 3 years ago. And people are complaining about the tax on fuel, the excise on fuel and the cost of oil per barrel. But while you can complain, the only thing that makes a difference is how you respond.

So if you can cycle, that's great. If you need a motorbike, that's good. And then when you get a family, get the most fuel economical car you can! My new Mazda 2 gets about 6l per 100km, much better than if I had got the "family car".

So choose your consequences. Cycling may not be feasible for all, but ffs, if you don't need a car with a big engine, THEN DON'T BUY ONE.

Just my 2c worth, particularly after a work colleague just asked me to sign a petition to reduce the fuel excise.

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Duct Tape is like the force.
It has a light side and a dark side and it holds the universe together.

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maybe.logic
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Icon 1 posted July 14, 2006 15:47      Profile for maybe.logic     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Elvermere:
Interesting discussion. I'm all pro biking as much as possible and used to ride to work. However these things change when you get a family. Once you have children the only really possible way to get through their childhood IS to have a car and to use it.

Here in West Australia the petrol price is about A$1.35 per litre. That's about 50% more than it was 3 years ago. And people are complaining about the tax on fuel, the excise on fuel and the cost of oil per barrel. But while you can complain, the only thing that makes a difference is how you respond.

So if you can cycle, that's great. If you need a motorbike, that's good. And then when you get a family, get the most fuel economical car you can! My new Mazda 2 gets about 6l per 100km, much better than if I had got the "family car".

So choose your consequences. Cycling may not be feasible for all, but ffs, if you don't need a car with a big engine, THEN DON'T BUY ONE.

Just my 2c worth, particularly after a work colleague just asked me to sign a petition to reduce the fuel excise.

Some fine points Elvermere, I do agree with you that the average familly does need a car to take their kids where they need to go etc, I know I certainly could'nt have done what I did in my childhood days if my parents did not have a car, but I used to bike whenever possible.

I think that England does have the most expensive petrol prices, well at least from what I have heard from others in different countries, which really does annoy me...

Unfortunalty your point on the "if you don't need a big engine" does not stand with the majority of the public, many people if they have the money to spend enjoy having a big V8 guzzeler, I would love one as well, but for many they choose to buy such cars because they enjoy driving about in them! and I dont really blame them, that is the problem.

On the topic of "eco-friendly" has anyone read/heard the idea of making stand-by on TV's and computers a thing of the past, what are your views on the matter?

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Colonel Panic
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Icon 1 posted July 18, 2006 16:39      Profile for Colonel Panic         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Then why do we get ridiculous petrol prices, surley the thriving Americans should pay more.

Because Mr. Logic,

You Europeans don't subsidize your oil industry the way we Americans do -- with the whole freakin' US defense department budget.

CP

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Free! Free at last!

Posts: 1809 | From: Glacier Melt, USA | Registered: Mar 2002  |  IP: Logged
Colonel Panic
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Icon 1 posted July 18, 2006 17:10      Profile for Colonel Panic         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Elvermere:
Interesting discussion. I'm all pro biking as much as possible and used to ride to work. However these things change when you get a family. Once you have children the only really possible way to get through their childhood IS to have a car and to use it.

Perhaps you should have written, "only really practicable way in my neck of the outback," Elvermere.

I recall selling the only motorized vehicle my family owned while raising a child.

School was within walking distance for my son. And so it was for my perennial-student former wife.

I had a job 10 miles away and rode the bicycle in all weather. This was in the deep-snow belt of Michigan in the USA, mind you. Minus 20 F is kinda fun on a bicycle. The snowy roads aren't as slippery.

A good set of panniers will carry groceries, and if you choose your neighborhood right, movies and restaurants are close by, too.

We had a Jack Taylor tandem setup for the boy, and used it. When I couldn't find anybody to look after the anklebiter during training, he tagged along on the Taylor and gave me play-by-play of the Tour de'France. I beat Eddy Merckx just about every time, too.

The money we saved back then helped us buy our first home. So the sacrifice was well worth it.

There are choices for a family. Most of the world's population never gets to choose to drive. If they did petrol would be a bajillion dollars/pounds/lera, etc. a litre. So thank your stars those folks can't choose that which you find impossible to live without.

Where I live now is not much different, only the office and groceries are closer. When I choose not to cruise on the Trek 730, Cannondale, Paramount or Hog, I cruise in a 26' sloop on the lake. That doesn't take much petrol, either.

Elveremere, I suspect the Missus is behind the choice to get an auto. I understand completely. I remember when mine declared, "Either that Harley goes, or I do."

All I had to do was tell her to hand me the 50W on the way out. That was the biggest energy-saving decision I ever made in my life.

CP

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Xanthine

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Icon 1 posted July 18, 2006 18:03      Profile for Xanthine     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Colonel Panic:
Minus 20 F is kinda fun on a bicycle. The snowy roads aren't as slippery.

Yeah but it's kinda tough to brake and change gears when your hands are numb. And when the feeling returns it hurts like a bitch... I'd take two wheels on a slippery road over thawing pain any day of the week.

I drove to work today and remembered why I almost never do this: parking sucks. The heat sucks. And I feel trapped. By the metal, by the traffic, by the line ups at the stoplights, by the whole ritual of finding the damn thing later.

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And it's one, two, three / On the wrong side of the lee / What were you meant for? / What were you meant for?
- The Decemberists

Posts: 7670 | From: the lab | Registered: Mar 2001  |  IP: Logged
Colonel Panic
BlabberMouth, the Next Generation
Member # 1200

Icon 1 posted July 18, 2006 18:49      Profile for Colonel Panic         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Cheesey Petes, Xanthine!

-20 too cold, +90 too hot.

You're not too easy to please are you?

[Wink]

Kids these days.

CP

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Free! Free at last!

Posts: 1809 | From: Glacier Melt, USA | Registered: Mar 2002  |  IP: Logged
Xanthine

Solid Nitrozanium SuperFan!
Member # 736

Member Rated:
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Icon 1 posted July 18, 2006 18:57      Profile for Xanthine     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Yeah, I know, real high maintenance over here...

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And it's one, two, three / On the wrong side of the lee / What were you meant for? / What were you meant for?
- The Decemberists

Posts: 7670 | From: the lab | Registered: Mar 2001  |  IP: Logged
maybe.logic
Alpha Geek
Member # 5014

Member Rated:
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Icon 1 posted July 19, 2006 03:34      Profile for maybe.logic     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Plymouth's roads were melting yesterday, apparantly, I did read the article in the Daily Mail [crazy]
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