homeGeek CultureWebstoreeCards!Forums!Joy of Tech!AY2K!webcam

The Geek Culture Forums


Post New Topic  New Poll  Post A Reply
my profile | directory login | | search | faq | forum home
  next oldest topic   next newest topic
» The Geek Culture Forums   » Other Geeky Stuff   » Ask a Geek!   » What happens to your data when you die?

 - UBBFriend: Email this page to someone!    
Author Topic: What happens to your data when you die?
fs

Solid Nitrozanium SuperFan!
Member # 1181

Icon 1 posted July 01, 2009 02:22      Profile for fs   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I just read Cory Doctorow's column When I'm dead, how will my loved ones break my password?

I think he ultimately hit on a viable solution, but it took him some interesting permutations to get there.

What other ways can you guys think of to handle this problem?

--------------------
I'm in ur database, makin' moar recordz.

Posts: 1973 | From: The Cat Ship | Registered: Mar 2002  |  IP: Logged
Ashitaka

SuperFan!
Member # 4924

Member Rated:
4
Icon 1 posted July 01, 2009 04:09      Profile for Ashitaka     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
great, i could do this becasue I have close relatives that live in differening cuantries. But what about the people who do not, who only know people who live in their own country so that a court order could force the password into the open.

though this is all just a mental excercise, a good one though, as we allknow that anybody using a cryptography is a peadophile and a terrr-rist.

--------------------
"If they're not gonna make a distinction between Muslims and violent extremists, then why should I take the time to distinguish between decent, fearful white people and racists?"

-Assif Mandvi

Posts: 3089 | From: Switzerland | Registered: Feb 2006  |  IP: Logged
dragonman97

SuperFan!
Member # 780

Member Rated:
4
Icon 1 posted July 01, 2009 06:20      Profile for dragonman97   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Easy: Put the passphrase in a safe deposit box.

--------------------
There are three things you can be sure of in life: Death, taxes, and reading about fake illnesses online...

Posts: 9332 | From: Westchester County, New York | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Ashitaka

SuperFan!
Member # 4924

Member Rated:
4
Icon 1 posted July 01, 2009 07:29      Profile for Ashitaka     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by dragonman97:
Easy: Put the passphrase in a safe deposit box.

if the safe deposit box is in the same country as you live, (depending on where you live), because it is inside your courts jurisdiction, it can be ordered open; or?

--------------------
"If they're not gonna make a distinction between Muslims and violent extremists, then why should I take the time to distinguish between decent, fearful white people and racists?"

-Assif Mandvi

Posts: 3089 | From: Switzerland | Registered: Feb 2006  |  IP: Logged
The Famous Druid

Gold Hearted SuperFan!
Member # 1769

Member Rated:
4
Icon 1 posted July 01, 2009 07:33      Profile for The Famous Druid     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
So, the yellow post-it note on the fridge isn't secure enough for you?

Ok, how about this...

Give the passphrase to someone you trust, and don't blog about it.

That way, if 'They' want your super-secret plans for a Calcinator Death Ray, 'They' don't know who to issue the court order to, and even if 'They' issue a bunch of court orders to everyone you know, your trusted friend has plausible deniability.

Dman:
quote:
from TFA:
I rejected a safe-deposit box because of all the horror stories I've heard of banks that refuse to allow access to boxes until the will is probated, and the data necessary to probate the will is in the box.

[edit]
Oh, and then there's the obligatory xkcd
 -

--------------------
If you watch 'The History Of NASA' backwards, it's about a space agency that has no manned spaceflight capability, then does low-orbit flights, then lands on the Moon.

Posts: 10680 | From: Melbourne, Australia | Registered: Oct 2002  |  IP: Logged
GrumpySteen

Solid Nitrozanium SuperFan
Member # 170

Icon 1 posted July 01, 2009 08:39      Profile for GrumpySteen     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
A safe deposit box is actually the best answer.

Access to a safe deposit box is difficult if not impossible until probate is finished, but that's kind of the point. Doctrow seems to be unaware of the fact that there should be more than one copy of your will. One copy should be in a safe deposit box, but at least one other should be stored somewhere easily accessible. The copy in the safe deposit box is there so that unauthorized alterations to the accessible copy can be discovered and your actual intentions followed.

--------------------
Worst. Celibate. Ever.

Posts: 6364 | From: Tennessee | Registered: Jan 2000  |  IP: Logged
The Famous Druid

Gold Hearted SuperFan!
Member # 1769

Member Rated:
4
Icon 1 posted July 01, 2009 09:04      Profile for The Famous Druid     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by GrumpySteen:
A safe deposit box is actually the best answer.

It's not just your will that should be backed-up off-site, it's all that encrypted data that's super-secret, but absolutely must be passed on to future generations. A safe deposit box is a good place to keep data backups.

Of course, for the paranoid, the data backup should be in a different safe deposit box, at a different bank, in a different country, registered under a false name, and sealed inside a block of solid Nitrozanium...

--------------------
If you watch 'The History Of NASA' backwards, it's about a space agency that has no manned spaceflight capability, then does low-orbit flights, then lands on the Moon.

Posts: 10680 | From: Melbourne, Australia | Registered: Oct 2002  |  IP: Logged
dragonman97

SuperFan!
Member # 780

Member Rated:
4
Icon 1 posted July 01, 2009 15:31      Profile for dragonman97   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
TFD: To your earlier message: Frankly, I ignored most of Doctorow's paranoid spiel and just wrote my answer based on common sense.

Ash: To "it can be ordered open?" - That's precisely the point.
Unless you're doing something rather illegal (and trying to hide evidence), it's going to take a heck-of-a-lot-of-work, or a 'Bank Job,' to get at it.

--------------------
There are three things you can be sure of in life: Death, taxes, and reading about fake illnesses online...

Posts: 9332 | From: Westchester County, New York | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Xanthine

Solid Nitrozanium SuperFan!
Member # 736

Member Rated:
5
Icon 1 posted July 01, 2009 19:12      Profile for Xanthine     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by GrumpySteen:
A safe deposit box is actually the best answer.

Access to a safe deposit box is difficult if not impossible until probate is finished, but that's kind of the point. Doctrow seems to be unaware of the fact that there should be more than one copy of your will. One copy should be in a safe deposit box, but at least one other should be stored somewhere easily accessible. The copy in the safe deposit box is there so that unauthorized alterations to the accessible copy can be discovered and your actual intentions followed.

So here's a question. What happens if someone alters your accessible copy in such a way that it appears to be your most recent will (my understanding of estate law is that, if multiple wills are found, the most recent one is the one followed)?

Aside from that...safe deposit box.

--------------------
And it's one, two, three / On the wrong side of the lee / What were you meant for? / What were you meant for?
- The Decemberists

Posts: 7670 | From: the lab | Registered: Mar 2001  |  IP: Logged
dragonman97

SuperFan!
Member # 780

Member Rated:
4
Icon 1 posted July 01, 2009 21:09      Profile for dragonman97   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I'm pretty sure that like an "Official Transcript," 'copies' are helpful resources, but not legally binding. I'm not entirely sure what the story is with seals or the like, but I've heard that some of these copies may be unsigned to further clarify their 'copy' status. I've also been told something about having one of the 'legal copies' left with your lawyer. However, IANAL, YMMV.

The best advice about these things: Talk to an attorney.

--------------------
There are three things you can be sure of in life: Death, taxes, and reading about fake illnesses online...

Posts: 9332 | From: Westchester County, New York | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Grummash

Gold Hearted SuperFan!
Member # 4289

Icon 1 posted July 02, 2009 06:50      Profile for Grummash     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by dragonman97:
However, IANAL

Do you? How very Bohemian! [Razz]

--------------------
...and yet, across the gulf of space, minds immeasurably superior to ours regarded this earth with envious eyes...

Posts: 2335 | From: Lancashire,UK | Registered: Aug 2005  |  IP: Logged
Metasquares
Highlie
Member # 4441

Member Rated:
5
Icon 1 posted July 02, 2009 07:50      Profile for Metasquares   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
If you're reasonably confident about the physical security of your system, put a sticky note with your passwords under the keyboard. It's a vulnerability, but only to those who can get into your house.

Or use biometrics. Register your fingerprint and that of several loved ones.

(Of course, neither of these will work if you're trying to hide things from law enforcement or whatever)

Posts: 664 | From: Morganville, NJ | Registered: Oct 2005  |  IP: Logged
TheMoMan
BlabberMouth, a Blabber Odyssey
Member # 1659

Member Rated:
4
Icon 1 posted July 02, 2009 10:45      Profile for TheMoMan         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
__________________ Yo ______________

____ A lot depends on the parties involved does the will have a poison pill paragraph, and if all parties will abide with the Last Will and Testament. I served as an Estate Personal Representative, keeping all parties in the loop and not bickering is not fun. Some times these things can go on for years or more. If it turns into a battle, the Lawyers win. The data is part of an Estate now how much is it worth? How valuable to each person.

--------------------
Those who would give up essential liberty to purchase a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety.


Benjamin Franklin,

Posts: 5848 | From: Just South of the Huron National Forest, in the water shed of the Rifle River | Registered: Sep 2002  |  IP: Logged
GrumpySteen

Solid Nitrozanium SuperFan
Member # 170

Icon 1 posted July 02, 2009 11:48      Profile for GrumpySteen     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Xanthine wrote:
So here's a question. What happens if someone alters your accessible copy in such a way that it appears to be your most recent will (my understanding of estate law is that, if multiple wills are found, the most recent one is the one followed)?

Generally lawsuits happen at that point.

--------------------
Worst. Celibate. Ever.

Posts: 6364 | From: Tennessee | Registered: Jan 2000  |  IP: Logged
quantumfluff
BlabberMouth, a Blabber Odyssey
Member # 450

Member Rated:
5
Icon 1 posted July 02, 2009 19:05      Profile for quantumfluff     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Ashitaka:
quote:
Originally posted by dragonman97:
Easy: Put the passphrase in a safe deposit box.

if the safe deposit box is in the same country as you live, (depending on where you live), because it is inside your courts jurisdiction, it can be ordered open; or?
IANAL..., but I do understand a few things about how reality works. :-)

If you own anything of value that requires some certificate (a deed, stock certificates, bonds, ...) you should own a safe deposit box. Besides holding these documents I keep my will there, copies of my life and homeowner's policies and often a backup disk drive. The point being that you have to provide a safe place for things what would be destroyed in a fire.

Now, regardless of the laws in your country, there is one rule.
1. You must let your spouse and children know where the key to the box is.
2. You must let them have access to it. Their signatures should be at the bank.
3. You must instruct them to empty the box first upon your death, before reporting it to anyone.

If the bank finds out you are dead, it might be required to seal the box, even from your spouse, until probate court orders it open. This could take months.

Now, this is just financial document advice. For passwords, I would
* put them in a plain text file
* PGP encrypt it
* Give the file to a computer savvy trusted relative to decrypt.
* Print the encryption key on paper with the instructions. "Give this to Uncle Bob, he will know what to do".
* Give copies of the key doc to my spouse, kids and one in the safe deposit box.

Posts: 2902 | From: 5 to 15 meters above sea level | Registered: Jun 2000  |  IP: Logged


All times are Eastern Time  
Post New Topic  New Poll  Post A Reply Close Topic    Move Topic    Delete Topic next oldest topic   next newest topic
 - Printer-friendly view of this topic
Hop To:

Contact Us | Geek Culture Home Page

2015 Geek Culture

Powered by Infopop Corporation
UBB.classicTM 6.4.0



homeGeek CultureWebstoreeCards!Forums!Joy of Tech!AY2K!webcam