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Author Topic: Nut Allergy Question
Thorned0Fortress
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Icon 1 posted April 30, 2006 20:45      Profile for Thorned0Fortress   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I have never had a problem with allergies. This spring, however, I had a severe sinus infection (which is coming back in just over a month), and am having very itchy eyes as well as sneezing.
I also have noticed that my body doesn't seem to like nuts, anymore.
I first noticed this when I ate 9-grain bread, instead of my usual 7-grain. The roof of my mouth & gums became irritated and sore for about two days. I thought that may be because of the new introduction to Flax, but I have some pain with 7-grain bread now, too. AND I was eating Peanut M&M's when the gums in the back of my mouth begain to hurt.
Does anyone know if It is common to develope allergies later in life?
Also, do you think that the nut thing is related to my first-time seasonal allergies?

I would appreciate any help.

I was just reading an article about a man who got a liver transplant, and had an allergic reaction to peanuts..... that is not my case [Wink]

Posts: 235 | From: texas | Registered: Oct 2005  |  IP: Logged
Xanthine

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Icon 1 posted April 30, 2006 21:15      Profile for Xanthine     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Technically spekaing, you can develop allergies to anything at any time. I don't know any statistics though.

My sympathies. I get seasonal allergies too, and they can be a real bear. I especially love it when someone accuses me of being contagious. [Roll Eyes]

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And it's one, two, three / On the wrong side of the lee / What were you meant for? / What were you meant for?
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Cap'n Vic

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Icon 1 posted April 30, 2006 21:16      Profile for Cap'n Vic     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Have you tried bouncing a pair of nuts on your chin?

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Snaggy

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Icon 3 posted April 30, 2006 21:29      Profile for Snaggy   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I sympathize! Last spring I had the same thing, and was really worried I was developing allergies to something here out on the west coast. (I had been allergy free for 4 yeaqrs or so, since moving from Ontario Canada)

However this year I haven't had anything yet... /me knocks on virtual wood. Hopefully you just have a stubborn sinus infection, but yeah, allergies can start anytime. [Frown]

Nitro's mom developed allergies to all perservative and additives a few years ago. She now has to make ALL her own food... breads, etc., and can not eat at restaurants. Just about any prepackaged food is deadly to her. On the plus side she is super healthy now!

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ARJ
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Icon 1 posted April 30, 2006 22:52      Profile for ARJ   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
You should be able to get an allergy test from your doctor. They can test for several common allergies and give you a general guage on how allergic you are to that substance.

When WeirdArms was having sinus problems he had an allergy test and showed a mild dust mite allergy, for instance.

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Shadow
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Icon 1 posted May 01, 2006 00:20      Profile for Shadow     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
My sympathies also Thorned0Fortress, I have had some experience with the sinus infections, itchy eyes, and such. It can be a real drag. If you are starting to have the seasonal allergies, it may be worth your time to get tested as ARJ suggested. If nothing else, you will know what causes problems and how to deal with it.

(Hope it turns out to be just a temporary issue for you with regard to nuts. It would be positively nutty to go with out nuts in various foods including M&M's ! [crazy] )

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Or manage it to part these men with me. - Benvolio (Romeo & Juliet)

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Willhh1
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Icon 1 posted May 01, 2006 05:41      Profile for Willhh1         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Allergies are not something to take lightly. I didn't have any problem until I was 20. I was snacking on a jar of mixed nuts at my parent's house, felt weird, threw up, and my parents wisely took me to the emergency room. Woke up the next day feeling OK, but the doc said it was a close thing. I suggest getting the test.
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drunkennewfiemidget
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Icon 1 posted May 01, 2006 07:47      Profile for drunkennewfiemidget     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
<me-too>
I had no allergies aside from cats for my entire life. Then, one summer when I was about 20, I figured I had a cold -- then it lasted 2 months.

I went to the doctor and got an allergy test. turns out I'm allergic to cats, ragweed, and mold.
</me-too>

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Black Widow
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Icon 1 posted May 01, 2006 10:11      Profile for Black Widow     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I was allergic to tree nuts (not peanuts) for a long time, until I got pregnant a couple of years ago. Then the allergy went away. I'm not saying get pregnant, don't get me wrong, just that allergies can come and go. I third or fourth or whateverth the motion for you to have allergy testing. Or if you figure out what gives you an allergic reaction, just avoid it.
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canadiangeek
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Icon 1 posted May 01, 2006 12:33      Profile for canadiangeek     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Allergies can come, or dissappear at any time in a person's life (I too suffer from seasonal allergies, and they only developed when I was 20-ish).

I would also like to add my name to the increasingly longer list of people who suggest you get tested. Until then, to be safe, I'd stay away from nuts, and peanuts.
But, if you do have a MINOR reaction, Benedryl (the pills) usually take care of most MINOR allergic reactions.

Just to let you know, most Nestle products (that don't actually contain nuts/peanuts) are made in a completely nut/peanut-free factory (so they're safe to eat). Also, Girl-Guide cookies are nut/peanut free. (Disclaimer: This may, or may not apply in Texas, as I can only speak for Canada).


Better to be safe than sorry.

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Maggs
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Icon 1 posted May 01, 2006 18:37      Profile for Maggs     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Definately get tested. It's good you noticed it early though.
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Groggle
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Icon 1 posted May 01, 2006 21:03      Profile for Groggle     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I have a nut allergy, as does as a very dear friend.

Thorned0Fortress, you just got your "warning" from your body - the next time can be much more serious. (In my friend's case, it resulted in a trip to the hospital - she survived, fortunately)

Like others have already said - get tested - find out.

In the meantime, read ingredients, religiously on everything. I've found "may contain" warnings in some of the oddest places! Even if you think a product is safe because it was okay last week when you bought it, you never know when the manufacturer is going to change something in their production. (cross contamination is scary beyond belief)

I've added a couple of other rules - if I can't tell what too many of the ingredients are (or they are things I shouldn't eat anyways), I don't buy the product. It usually means I eat quite a bit healthier - even if I do have to make it myself.

Be cautious with the fast food as well - KFC used to use peanut oil to cook in all the time in Canada. (Most places are using a seed oil (canola or some such)

I got the same wake-up call you did eating a plain chocolate chip cookie (no nuts in it), and when I checked the package, there was the warning label - meaning it had been processed on the same production line as something with nuts - *augh!*

I hate to seem alarmist, but it's really quite important to figure out what you are allergic to - and take precautions. (I think chasing an ambulance with a close friend in it to a hospital sorta made the point for me!)

Nestle products are _often_ good, but you still have to check on a case by case basis. (But they do label themselves quite clearly about what's safe and what isn't) In Canada, the Dare brand is getting much better about this as well.

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Mochan
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Icon 1 posted May 01, 2006 22:16      Profile for Mochan     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I'm allergic to seafood. I don't know if I'm *still* allergic to seafood (I think I am) but eating oil from the allergic substance is just as bad as eating it; when shrimp is fried in a pan and the oil is used to fry what I will eat later, I get all allergic even though I didn't actually eat any shrimp.

Anyway check the labels of whatever food you buy at a supermarket; they will usually say "was manufactured with facilities that have trace nuts" or some such, which can still affect you.

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Thorned0Fortress
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Icon 1 posted May 01, 2006 22:35      Profile for Thorned0Fortress   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I have not had anything serious, not do I think it will ever escelade to that.
My ma's mouth hurts when she eats walnuts directly.

Posts: 235 | From: texas | Registered: Oct 2005  |  IP: Logged
Xanthine

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Icon 1 posted May 02, 2006 00:06      Profile for Xanthine     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by canadiangeek:

But, if you do have a MINOR reaction, Benedryl (the pills) usually take care of most MINOR allergic reactions.

The syrup will work faster. It's liquid so it gets absorbed more readily. You can do a shot of it if you're having a bad reaction and don't have an Epi-Pen and buy yourself some time - a paramedic I knew told me that trick. But call 911 first, and then tell anyone who shows up that you took the Benadryl. And don't eat or drink anything if you're not going to be able to swallow!

If you do have an Epi-Pen, for god's sake carry it and use it. The ambulance will be fast, not maybe not fast enough. I saw several allergic reactions back when I was an EMT. The first thing the paramedics pushed was Benadryl by injection. However, if the patient's throat was closing, we gave epinephrine and the thing about epi is it only works if you get it in time. I'm not sure what the window is, but for the one case I saw where we needed to use epinephrine, the window had shut by the time we got on the scene. The pateint made it to the hospital, but nothing we or the hospital could do restored her airway and she died before we'd finished writing up the call.

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And it's one, two, three / On the wrong side of the lee / What were you meant for? / What were you meant for?
- The Decemberists

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canadiangeek
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Icon 1 posted May 02, 2006 04:53      Profile for canadiangeek     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
OriginaLLY POSTED BY Xanthine:
The syrup will work faster. It's liquid so it gets absorbed more readily. You can do a shot of it if you're having a bad reaction and don't have an Epi-Pen and buy yourself some time - a paramedic I knew told me that trick. But call 911 first, and then tell anyone who shows up that you took the Benadryl. And don't eat or drink anything if you're not going to be able to swallow!

If you do have an Epi-Pen, for god's sake carry it and use it. The ambulance will be fast, not maybe not fast enough. I saw several allergic reactions back when I was an EMT. The first thing the paramedics pushed was Benadryl by injection. However, if the patient's throat was closing, we gave epinephrine and the thing about epi is it only works if you get it in time. I'm not sure what the window is, but for the one case I saw where we needed to use epinephrine, the window had shut by the time we got on the scene. The pateint made it to the hospital, but nothing we or the hospital could do restored her airway and she died before we'd finished writing up the call.

You are quite right, the liquid is faster... sorry, guess I should have included that. Anyhow, I was just trying to illustrate that Benadryl (the cream) was definately not what you want to use. (guess I should've said that in the first place.)

As for the window, I was told during my MFR training that there wasn't an "offficial window", that it depended on the person, and their level of reaction. I think it's generally taken as when their throaght totally closes over. I know that I had two twins in Scouting with me, and they had roughly 30 seconds to get an epi into them before that happened (they alwayse carried two each). But they won't issue an epi to you if you're only having a reaction like Thorned0 mentioned.

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Black Widow
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Icon 1 posted May 02, 2006 11:48      Profile for Black Widow     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Another great thing to have on hand if you or anyone in your family suffers from these kinds of allergies is a Primatene Mist inhaler (if you don't have an epi pen). It contains epinephrine and in a pinch can at least delay the respiratory effects of the allergic reaction. This is something I learned many years ago in my EMT training (I think my instructor got it from a backwoods survival book).
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Groggle
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Icon 1 posted May 02, 2006 17:33      Profile for Groggle     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
I have not had anything serious, not do I think it will ever escelade to that.
My ma's mouth hurts when she eats walnuts directly.

Two very small points, Thorne -

1) Allergies change - we don't get a warning when they are going to do so.

2) You did note that this is a change in symptoms for you in your original post.

My own experience is that my response has changed quite surprisingly every 4-5 years since I entered my 20s. You might be lucky and never have more than a sore mouth - or not.

Please, be careful.

Anaphylaxis Canada Website

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magefile
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Icon 1 posted May 02, 2006 17:59      Profile for magefile     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
We seem to have some allergy experts here, so I guess I should ask. Almost exactly a year ago, I had a reaction to amoxicillin (an antibiotic), most likely due to overexposure . Swollen face/lips, vertigo, red rash, my temperature shot up, etc. But I've had at least one doctor tell me that "even though [I] had a reaction, [I] may not be allergic". What exactly does that mean? Are they referring to the fact that by the time a doctor got around to seeing me in the ER, it was gone, or something else?
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Shadow
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Icon 1 posted May 02, 2006 19:26      Profile for Shadow     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Thorned0Fortress, if you experience any more soreness, you can always enlist our help in eating those Peanut M&M's. [Big Grin]

--------------------
I do but keep the peace: put up thy sword,
Or manage it to part these men with me. - Benvolio (Romeo & Juliet)

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canadiangeek
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Icon 1 posted May 03, 2006 07:29      Profile for canadiangeek     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Magefile:
We seem to have some allergy experts here, so I guess I should ask. Almost exactly a year ago, I had a reaction to amoxicillin (an antibiotic), most likely due to overexposure . Swollen face/lips, vertigo, red rash, my temperature shot up, etc. But I've had at least one doctor tell me that "even though [I] had a reaction, [I] may not be allergic". What exactly does that mean? Are they referring to the fact that by the time a doctor got around to seeing me in the ER, it was gone, or something else?

Were you taking any other medication at the time??

Also, were you taking it for an ear infection (would possibly explain the vertigo), pneumonia, or something totally different?

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magefile
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Icon 1 posted May 03, 2006 09:34      Profile for magefile     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by canadiangeek:
Were you taking any other medication at the time??

Also, were you taking it for an ear infection (would possibly explain the vertigo), pneumonia, or something totally different?

"Other medication": technically it was Augmentin, which is amoxicillin + clavulanate potassium. I was probably also on ibuprofen at the time.

Not taking it for an ear infection (*that* time - ear infections are part of the overexposure I mentioned). Sinus infection, though, which could explain vertigo. Regardless, it just goes to show how tough it can be to narrow this all down - which etiology for which symptom?

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canadiangeek
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Icon 1 posted May 03, 2006 10:43      Profile for canadiangeek     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by magefile:
Regardless, it just goes to show how tough it can be to narrow this all down - which etiology for which symptom?

That's why I like being a MFR... usually if I get called, it's only to keep someone alive until the doctors take over, and it's usually fairly obvious what's wrong with them (missing limb, heart attack, not breathing, etc.)

Also, under Canadian Law, we're not allowed to administer medication (yes, this means that legally we can't administer epipens as well); we can legally only administer medical oxygen.

disclaimer: "Legally" doesn't mean that I won't.... I personally have the moral obligation to do so if it will save someone's life... it just means that I can "legally" be sued afterwards.

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Stereo

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Icon 1 posted May 03, 2006 11:12      Profile for Stereo     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by canadiangeek:
quote:
Originally posted by magefile:
Regardless, it just goes to show how tough it can be to narrow this all down - which etiology for which symptom?

Also, under Canadian Law, we're not allowed to administer medication (yes, this means that legally we can't administer epipens as well); we can legally only administer medical oxygen.

Didn't I just read it was about to change?

OK, just checked out: In the Quebec City area, EMTs are being trained to give some basic medication. It also states that Ontario's EMTs can also do it. So it's probably a provincial/regional regulation rather than a federal law. (That makes sense: health is considered of provincial relevance.)

(Edited: I just understood from Xanthine's comment that paramedic >> EMT, so, from context, EMT is probably a better translation for "ambulancier". I'll have to check what is the equivalent for paramedic in French - given there is an official differenciation between the two.)

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Xanthine

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Icon 1 posted May 03, 2006 11:41      Profile for Xanthine     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
In the US what you're allowed to give depends on your level of training and where you work. There's national protocols, and then states and regions within states (it all depnds on how the state sets its system up) will add to that as they feel as appropriate. As a basic level EMT, I was allowed to give anybody who needed it oxygen, liquid charcoal, and glucose syrup. If the patient had a prescription and was able to present the drug in its container with their name on it I could also help them tkae nitroglycerin or use and inhaler. I could also shoot them with their own Epipen. I never had to do any of that (except give oxygen) because when the kinds of calls that would require such treatment came in a real paramedic was dispatched with me. While I was an EMT, my state changed the rules and I was allowed to carry and use an Epipen under certain circumstances, and I was also allowed to set up someone with a nebulizer. I did set up a neb once under the direction of a paramedic. I never had to use the Epipen though. These protocols were more for people practicing out in more remote areas where it's harder to get a paramedic than in the suburb I was volunteering in, and in the case of the Epipen and nebulizer I had to call the ER first and work under the direction of the on-call doctor. I think with the Epipen I was also supposed to request a paramedic to be dispatched for an intercept, but it's been about three years since my cert expired and I really don't remember that protocol (not that it would matter as I now live in a different state with ddifferent rules). Exciting stuff, but once again, I never had to do that becausefor allergic reaction and/or trouble breathing calls there was a paramedic responding right along beside me.

The paramedics could set IVs, give all kinds of drugs and do some other fairly advanced procedures if the situation required it. They can also, in most areas, clear spines, which is why I was kind of glad a paramedic showed up at my accident a few weeks ago. He didn't ride in with me but he did tell the firefighters and ambulance crew not to board me (PHEW!!!). The paramedic training is pretty grueling though, which is why there aren't as many paramedics as there are basics. However, for the majority of calls, you don't need that level of skill.

I have been told that in some very remote parts of this country even basics are allowed to set IVs, take four-lead EKGs, and even intubate.

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And it's one, two, three / On the wrong side of the lee / What were you meant for? / What were you meant for?
- The Decemberists

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