homeGeek CultureWebstoreeCards!Forums!Joy of Tech!AY2K!webcam

The Geek Culture Forums


Post New Topic  New Poll  Post A Reply
my profile | directory login | | search | faq | forum home
  next oldest topic   next newest topic
» The Geek Culture Forums   » Other Geeky Stuff   » Ask a Geek!   » Wireless network problems

 - UBBFriend: Email this page to someone!    
Author Topic: Wireless network problems
fanboy_uk

Member # 2132

Member Rated:
4
Icon 8 posted April 20, 2005 15:09      Profile for fanboy_uk   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
After much frustration and searching Google, forums, Apple website and praying to TTB Goddesses I have finally decided to ask for help. The problem?

At home I have a 600KB broadband connection with NTL (I'm based in Brighton, UK). After the cable modem I have an Apple Airport Extreme Basestation.

I have one G3 iBook and one G3 eMac. Both can see the base station with Airport networking switched on (sorry they do both have Airport Cards - the old ones). Both have full strength signals. However, only one of them can connect to the internet.

I have checked a few newsgroups that say that some broadband providers can only have one machine pass through a cable modem, well this doesn't seem to be a problem here as the iBook works fine on Airport and the eMac can work on the 'net simultaneously via Built-in Ethernet.

Why doesn't the eMac work wirelessly? Has anyone encountered something similar? It could well be that there is something so patently obvious that I have overlooked it but I fear I have tried everything.

We need to move Tru's eMac as babyfanboy_uk or babyfangirl_uk will need it after he/she/it arrives.

Thanks in anticipation of any help.
M.

--------------------
A woman walked into a cocktail bar, took one look at the drinks menu and asked the barman for a Double Entendré.
So he gave her one


Posts: 161 | From: Brighton, UK (50.8389, -00.1876) | Registered: Apr 2003  |  IP: Logged
littlefish
BlabberMouth, a Blabber Odyssey
Member # 966

Member Rated:
4
Icon 1 posted April 20, 2005 15:57      Profile for littlefish   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Check you have the cable going into the right port on the back f the airport. I can't remember if you want to use the LAN or the WAN port. Try switching to see if it helps. Secondly, a lot of ISP's will only allow one connection to a modem. This is policed by MAC addresses and may require you to register the address with them.
Posts: 2421 | From: That London | Registered: Nov 2001  |  IP: Logged
fanboy_uk

Member # 2132

Member Rated:
4
Icon 1 posted April 20, 2005 23:14      Profile for fanboy_uk   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Thanks for your response littlefish, if the cables are in the wrong ports on the back you get a message suggesting you may have them switched and maybe it's a good idea to check.

To clarify the eMac is connected by ethernet to the Basestation and the iBook is wireless. Both can access the internet.

If I pull the ethernet cable from the eMac the wireless card in the eMac, though able to see the basestation and able to update the basestation cannot see the internet.

I am starting to wonder if there may be a problem with the card.
I'll try swapping them over (though I'm sure I did this already).
I've looked to see if there are any diagnostic tools out there that can see if you have a broken card but not seen any.

--------------------
A woman walked into a cocktail bar, took one look at the drinks menu and asked the barman for a Double Entendré.
So he gave her one


Posts: 161 | From: Brighton, UK (50.8389, -00.1876) | Registered: Apr 2003  |  IP: Logged
Callipygous
BlabberMouth, a Blabber Odyssey
Member # 2071

Member Rated:
4
Icon 1 posted April 21, 2005 05:16      Profile for Callipygous     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Your set up is absolutely identical to my own, right down to living in Brighton and using NTL. I presume your Airport is also acting as a DHCP server, so NTL will only need to register the MAC of the base station. If that is so, I would suggest that one of the Macs is either incorrectly configured or has a hardware problem of some description.

If however your problem is more to do with NTL, as you probably have already found out, their telephone helpline is staffed by chimpanzees, who get completely lost if your query is one not covered by their script. The most useful online resources I have found are NTHell:world, Robin Walker's Cable Modem page, and the ntl newsgoups (only found on ntl's news server).

--------------------
"Knowledge is Power. France is Bacon" - Milton

Posts: 2922 | From: Brighton - UK | Registered: Mar 2003  |  IP: Logged
NOP
Geek Apprentice
Member # 3842

Rate Member
Icon 1 posted April 21, 2005 06:41      Profile for NOP     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
My experience with using NTL is that you do not need to actually register your computer(s) MAC with them - you can just plug any computer into the modem via ethernet and it will pick up an IP via DHCP, providing you first cycle the power on the modem (effectively reseting it). The modem works with whichever computer gets an address from it first and igonore all others, preventing users from trying to share the connection through a simple hub or switch. As Callipygous hints at, the Airport base station probably needs to be set as a router, providing a local DHCP and NAT or somesuch.
Posts: 46 | From: TL050227 | Registered: Apr 2005  |  IP: Logged
RScottV

SuperFan!
Member # 3540

Member Rated:
5
Icon 1 posted April 21, 2005 08:26      Profile for RScottV     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I wasn't sure from your post if you meant that:
1. Both computers can connect to the internet, but only one at a time.
OR
2. The eMac doesn't connect to the internet at all.

Also, what is your OS?

I have a similar setup with an iBook, PB, and older (strawberry) iMac. I have run into issues around both 1 and 2 above.

What seemed to help me on OS X was to actually assign an IP address to the problem computer (rather than having it assign it's own.)

In network system prefs, choose "Airport" then "TCP", choose DHCP with assigned IP. For my ABS, the IP needs to be 10.0.1.# (where # is something from 1 to 255), the subnet mask is 255.255.255.0, and the router is 10.0.1.1, but I am not sure if all airports are set up that way. I assigned a diffent IP to the problem computers. My PB seems to do fine just on automatic network settings.

Using your Airport admin utility, you also need to make sure that your base station is set to "distribute IP addresses" and to share a range of addresses. Also, because you have 802.11b airport cards, make sure that your airport base station is set to either 802,11b or 802.11b/g compatiblity. Setting your wireless options to "interference robustness" will help if you have other wireless devices arround like phones.

Network problems are a pain! I wish I understood them better, but the above worked for me.

Posts: 211 | From: Saint Paul, MN | Registered: Feb 2005  |  IP: Logged
Callipygous
BlabberMouth, a Blabber Odyssey
Member # 2071

Member Rated:
4
Icon 1 posted April 22, 2005 01:30      Profile for Callipygous     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by NOP:
My experience with using NTL is that you do not need to actually register your computer(s) MAC with them

My experience of NTL is the polar opposite, but as I said in my previous post, if all his computers are sitting behind the Airport Base Station's DHCP/NAT set up, then the only MAC that matters is the router's.

quote:
Originally posted by RScottV:
What seemed to help me on OS X was to actually assign an IP address to the problem computer (rather than having it assign it's own.)

Tip: If you do this with the Airport doing its DHCP/NAT thing it is well to assign an IP no. 10.0.1.201 or greater as the DHCP server reserves the IP addresses up to 200.

--------------------
"Knowledge is Power. France is Bacon" - Milton

Posts: 2922 | From: Brighton - UK | Registered: Mar 2003  |  IP: Logged
drunkennewfiemidget
BlabberMouth, a Blabber Odyssey
Member # 2814

Member Rated:
4
Icon 1 posted April 22, 2005 06:03      Profile for drunkennewfiemidget     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I'm in Canada, so the systems might be different, but the rule of the generic docsis systems here are:

Whatever device is directly connected to the cable modem registers its MAC with the cable modem. The cable modem will refuse to talk to anything else unless it is hard reset, or the IP address is DHCP released.

You can fake MAC addresses on some devices to make them work without any other nonsense.

If you plug the cable modem into a hub, and put more than one computer on that hub (and the hub does NO routing at all), then everything else hooked up to the modem has to be known by your ISP, or they simply won't work.

YMMV.

Posts: 4897 | From: Cambridge, ON, Canada | Registered: Jun 2004  |  IP: Logged
Wolfman
Mini Geek
Member # 3434

Member Rated:
5
Icon 1 posted May 03, 2005 08:59      Profile for Wolfman   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
The past three states I've lived in, all using different highspeed providers, Only kept track of the cable modems MAC, and you could pretty much plug anything straight into the cable modem without resetting. I do feel for you though, I have two routers connected together that I have to configure whenever I need an extra port opened(one wireless, one 10/100), quite the pain in the arse.

I dont know any specifics on the airport cards or routers, but know if you were having a windows wireless problem, I've faced them all, and would be right here with the answer, heh.

--------------------
Sincerely,
The Wolfman

LOST: One Grip (fits my reality)

Posts: 83 | From: North side of the House, Middle of Town, Middle of Kansas, USA, Earth | Registered: Feb 2005  |  IP: Logged
silentwhispa
Single Celled Newbie
Member # 4831

Rate Member
Icon 1 posted January 17, 2006 11:17      Profile for silentwhispa     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Hi searching for help!!! Have a similar problem as outlined below by another unfortunate mac user, in fac the problem is identical except i have a d-link modem connected to a airport extreme base station and a g4 powerbook and g3 imac connected. only one mac will wk at a time and unusually if my modem is connected to the WAN port of ABS cant connect to net, however if connected to LAN works fine. Any ideas out there, i've reset everything countless times and could my WAN port on ABS be broken, if so how can i test it? any help will be appreciated.

------------------------------------------------------
Topic: Wireless network problems
fanboy_uk

Solid Nitrozanium SuperFan!
Member # 2132

Member Rated:
posted April 20, 2005 15:09
After much frustration and searching Google, forums, Apple website and praying to TTB Goddesses I have finally decided to ask for help. The problem?

At home I have a 600KB broadband connection with NTL (I'm based in Brighton, UK). After the cable modem I have an Apple Airport Extreme Basestation.

I have one G3 iBook and one G3 eMac. Both can see the base station with Airport networking switched on (sorry they do both have Airport Cards - the old ones). Both have full strength signals. However, only one of them can connect to the internet.

I have checked a few newsgroups that say that some broadband providers can only have one machine pass through a cable modem, well this doesn't seem to be a problem here as the iBook works fine on Airport and the eMac can work on the 'net simultaneously via Built-in Ethernet.

Why doesn't the eMac work wirelessly? Has anyone encountered something similar? It could well be that there is something so patently obvious that I have overlooked it but I fear I have tried everything.

Posts: 2 | From: uk | Registered: Jan 2006  |  IP: Logged
drunkennewfiemidget
BlabberMouth, a Blabber Odyssey
Member # 2814

Member Rated:
4
Icon 1 posted January 17, 2006 11:21      Profile for drunkennewfiemidget     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
If you look at fanboy_uk's postcount, you might find it's > 150. Yours is 1. NEXT!
Posts: 4897 | From: Cambridge, ON, Canada | Registered: Jun 2004  |  IP: Logged
drunkennewfiemidget
BlabberMouth, a Blabber Odyssey
Member # 2814

Member Rated:
4
Icon 1 posted January 18, 2006 12:09      Profile for drunkennewfiemidget     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I've had to turn of e-mailing through the board, since mr silentwhispa has decided he needed to e-mail me to tell me "I shouldn't be so rude."

*sigh*

Posts: 4897 | From: Cambridge, ON, Canada | Registered: Jun 2004  |  IP: Logged
Grummash

Gold Hearted SuperFan!
Member # 4289

Icon 1 posted January 18, 2006 14:34      Profile for Grummash     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
fanboy_uk

I have a similar set-up, but I have not experienced the problems you describe. I'm on NTL cable broadband and I have a G4 iMac connected to a Netgear wireless router by ethernet cable, and Mrs Grummash has a G3 iBook which connects by Airport card.

To set up the Netgear router, there was nothing about registering a MAC with NTL - the router gives its IP address to the cable modem, and DHCP/NAT ensures each individual machine's IP address is kept private.

I haven't really got a full solution for you, but this may be worth thinking about:

If both Airport cards can see the base station and update it, I can't see that the fault lies with either card. However, if you have enabled MAC filtering on the base station (which I would recommend) you need to make sure that the MAC for both airport cards is on the "Wireless Card Access list" ( I am assuming there will be the something similar on your base station setup)

If you have explored this already, apologies - but I thought it might help.

--------------------
...and yet, across the gulf of space, minds immeasurably superior to ours regarded this earth with envious eyes...

Posts: 2335 | From: Lancashire,UK | Registered: Aug 2005  |  IP: Logged
Callipygous
BlabberMouth, a Blabber Odyssey
Member # 2071

Member Rated:
4
Icon 1 posted January 18, 2006 16:18      Profile for Callipygous     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Grum the fanboy posted about this in April. He has either sorted it out by now, or died of internet starvation.

--------------------
"Knowledge is Power. France is Bacon" - Milton

Posts: 2922 | From: Brighton - UK | Registered: Mar 2003  |  IP: Logged
Grummash

Gold Hearted SuperFan!
Member # 4289

Icon 1 posted January 18, 2006 22:12      Profile for Grummash     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Callipygous:
Grum the fanboy posted about this in April. He has either sorted it out by now, or died of internet starvation.

Ah...so he did [ohwell] I really must watch out for those necros [shake head]
Thanks, Calli [Big Grin]

--------------------
...and yet, across the gulf of space, minds immeasurably superior to ours regarded this earth with envious eyes...

Posts: 2335 | From: Lancashire,UK | Registered: Aug 2005  |  IP: Logged
Rhonwyyn

Solid Gold SuperFan!
Member # 2854

Member Rated:
4
Icon 1 posted January 18, 2006 22:49      Profile for Rhonwyyn   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
But all's well that ends well, 'cause I'm about to set up a home network. We're planning on plugging the G4 tower into the linksys wireless router, which is plugged into the cable modem. If we do that, I should still be able to use the Internet via the WAN through the AirPort card in my Pismo, right?

Also, how do I password-protect my wireless connection? I want to lock it so other people can't use it.

--------------------
Change the way you SEE, not the way you LOOK!

Posts: 3849 | From: Lancaster, PA | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged
GameMaster
BlabberMouth, a Blabber Odyssey
Member # 1173

Member Rated:
4
Icon 1 posted January 19, 2006 01:07      Profile for GameMaster   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
You could enable WEP, but it can be broken in 12 minutes... There's even a "Howto break WEP in 12 minutes". WiFi is still VERY inherintly insecure.

Filtering by MAC address is a good idea (that's a Media Access Control address) is a good idea, but I'm not sure if your hardware would allow it. What that would do is allow your router to check a hardwired number that is located on the wireless card itself to restrict access. Keep in mind that is can be "spoofed" as well, but added to WEP and you're a bit better off.

Then only allow access to certian ports (port 80 and any other port you know you'll use -- Read: IIRC's port, and you IM's port, mail and maybe ssh... unless you tunel them all through port 80), by changing the router's configurations for the wireless. Take the wireless offline anytime your not using it (if it's always up, it'll be really easy for someone to "brute force") and don't connect at the same time every night.

You can also run software on your computer that makes it look like you have several hundred access points at once, when you only have one. This makes it hard for them to figgure out which is the right one to start with. That bing said, it also creates distructive interfernece for other people near you who have their own legit WiFi setup.

--------------------
My Site

Posts: 3038 | From: State of insanity | Registered: Mar 2002  |  IP: Logged
Kinguy
Geek
Member # 4527

Member Rated:
5
Icon 1 posted January 19, 2006 02:05      Profile for Kinguy     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 

Posts: 181 | Registered: Oct 2005  |  IP: Logged
The Famous Druid

Gold Hearted SuperFan!
Member # 1769

Member Rated:
4
Icon 1 posted January 19, 2006 02:11      Profile for The Famous Druid     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by GameMaster:
You could enable WEP, but it can be broken in 12 minutes... There's even a "Howto break WEP in 12 minutes". WiFi is still VERY inherintly insecure.

Of course, if you have a fairly recenty wireless base station, it'll have WPA, which is far more secure than WEP.

Filtering by MAC address is a good idea (that's a Media Access Control address) is a good idea, but I'm not sure if your hardware would allow it. What that would do is allow your router to check a hardwired number that is located on the wireless card itself to restrict access. Keep in mind that is can be "spoofed" as well, but added to WEP and you're a bit better off.

WEP and MAC filtering are like the ordinary locks most people have on their doors, they won't keep out a bad guy with a sledge hammer, but they're pretty good at keeping honest people honest.

WPA is more like the metal grills you see on the front of pawnbrokers, it's designed to keep out all but the most determined bad guys.

In answer to Rhonnies question, check the support section for your model on the linksys web site, it should have instructions for enabling security.

--------------------
If you watch 'The History Of NASA' backwards, it's about a space agency that has no manned spaceflight capability, then does low-orbit flights, then lands on the Moon.

Posts: 10669 | From: Melbourne, Australia | Registered: Oct 2002  |  IP: Logged
Callipygous
BlabberMouth, a Blabber Odyssey
Member # 2071

Member Rated:
4
Icon 1 posted January 19, 2006 02:22      Profile for Callipygous     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Rhonnie what the GM said may be correct, but the convenience of WiFi easily outweighs the security risks, which need only really concern you if your computer contains secrets which might compromise national security. Most routers are configured using your browser, though how clear the instructions are vary by make. The security steps that I would take are first to change the name of the network to something not easily guessed and make it a closed network, which means it does not broadcast its name. Use the strongest encryption you can, (WPA is better than WEP). Then restrict access by MAC address to those machines that need to use it. Lastly turn on your OSX firewall. Your network will now be much better protected than most, which will prevent casual use by opportunists, which is 99% of the problem, though as the GM pointed out a determined hacker can get through anything.

--------------------
"Knowledge is Power. France is Bacon" - Milton

Posts: 2922 | From: Brighton - UK | Registered: Mar 2003  |  IP: Logged
silentwhispa
Single Celled Newbie
Member # 4831

Rate Member
Icon 1 posted January 19, 2006 15:04      Profile for silentwhispa     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Grummash

Thanks for the advice Grum, i have checked and double checked all that u advised but no luck. Think the problem is narrowed down to a hardware failure with the WAN port which means its not doing the NAT functions correctly so gonna have to replace the ABS and hopefully all be well. Appreciate the assist though. By the way are Ntl apple mac friendly, cos Wanadoo dont seem to care at bout mac users, may be something 4me to consider when changing ISP in the future. Cheers 4 the help, really appreciate it.

Posts: 2 | From: uk | Registered: Jan 2006  |  IP: Logged


All times are Eastern Time  
Post New Topic  New Poll  Post A Reply Close Topic    Move Topic    Delete Topic next oldest topic   next newest topic
 - Printer-friendly view of this topic
Hop To:

Contact Us | Geek Culture Home Page

© 2015 Geek Culture

Powered by Infopop Corporation
UBB.classicTM 6.4.0



homeGeek CultureWebstoreeCards!Forums!Joy of Tech!AY2K!webcam