homeGeek CultureWebstoreeCards!Forums!Joy of Tech!AY2K!webcam

The Geek Culture Forums


Post New Topic  New Poll  Post A Reply
my profile | directory login | | search | faq | forum home
  next oldest topic   next newest topic
» The Geek Culture Forums   » Other Geeky Stuff   » Ask a Geek!   » Yahoo accounts - anyone had luck persuading them to reactivate cancelled accounts?

 - UBBFriend: Email this page to someone!    
Author Topic: Yahoo accounts - anyone had luck persuading them to reactivate cancelled accounts?
Michael Edwards
Mini Geek
Member # 747

Member Rated:
4
Icon 1 posted March 16, 2004 02:37      Profile for Michael Edwards   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
      I hope I haven't chosen the wrong forum for this question - but...

      Until about a week ago, I've had a Yahoo e-mail and groups account under a pseudonym, which I used to post to certain groups - and, about a week ago, with no warning or reason whatsoever, Yahoo deactivated it. I think it must probably have been accidental, since I cannot think of anything that I did which might have caused them to cancel my account deliberately.
      Repeated attempts to write to them and have this correctred have been in vain: I only got one e-mail in response to this, and I think it was merely a robotic form letter that simply told me what the help screens on their web site had already told me - advice which I had already tried following, and which didn't work. (This letter didn't answer my questions, and I have to wonder if they treat people like fools.)
      The problem is not my password, because I tried following their suggestions about getting a new password, and that didn't work. It isn't anything obvious like typing my password in upper- instead of lower-case, mistyping my user-name, or anything like that.
      To be sure, I can just use another Yahoo account to keep posting - but I became known under a particular identity on a few groups, and I wish to continue that if I can recover it. I also had a few e-mails stored there which I would like to restore, although that may not quite be the end of the world.
      I tried opening a new account under the same name, figuring it might be available now if it was cancelled - but was told that someone had already chosen that name; so obviously my old account has not yet been completely removed from their records - just marked as "deactivated". I tried writing to the address, and it was returned as undeliverable.

      Just wondering if anyone here uses Yahoo, and has had this problem, and have they solved it satisfactorily? Has anyone had luck actually reaching a human being at Yahoo, and persuading them to restore an account intact? If so, I'd be grateful if they could please pass on any ideas on how to deal with this.
      Judging by comments from other people, fixing this is going to be like trying to revive the dead, and Yahoo staff are apparently notoriously unhelpful and robotic about such matters; but occasionally people have had luck with restoring cancelled accounts, even getting all their data back intact - so I thought it worth while asking for ideas here.
      Should I just keep writing back to them, on the theory that they have lots of staff who answer such enquiries, and, if I get ignored by an uncooperative human the first time I write, if I just try again, I might get attended to by someone more helpful? Or is it possible they share information, and could I get black-listed by them all if I write too often, and they perceive me as nagging? (Any letters I've sent have been polite, and not abusive in any way.)
      If I write to them again, would I be best off not mentioning previous attempts at getting it sorted out, and pretending it's my first enquiry - or would all the people who deal with such matters share information with each other anyway?
      The nickname I used was perhaps a little "eccentric" - is it possible that could leave a bad impression on Yahoo staff, and they might deem that I don't deserve to have my account back? (If they had a deliberate campaign to try to eliminate "eccentric" (or worse) nicknames, however, they'd surely have their work cut out for them!)

      I'd appreciate any ideas on this.
      Thanks.

                              Regards,
                                Michael.

Posts: 70 | From: Healesville, Victoria, Australia | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
Gibbonboy
Geek
Member # 2426

Member Rated:
5
Icon 1 posted March 16, 2004 02:54      Profile for Gibbonboy   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I actually tried to get Yahoo to delete one of my accounts a while back, and received an email from a real person saying that they don't remove accounts in response to user requests. Not sure why, but I thought that once you had an account, it was there for good. I've let accounts idle for 2 years or more, and I can still log right into them with no problem. I did have a problem with my password once, but changed it and everything works now.
Depending on what your user name is, if the yahoo staff did find it to be offensive in any way, they would indeed block the account. I think it's in their TOS.
I've switched now to using myway, no ads and about the same service. I do use yahoo to access my radio club's group, but that's about it anymore.

--------------------
"It's not the end of the world, but you can see it from here."

Posts: 155 | From: A Very Small Hole in the Forest | Registered: Nov 2003  |  IP: Logged
nekomatic
SuperFan!
Member # 376

Member Rated:
5
Icon 3 posted March 16, 2004 05:05      Profile for nekomatic     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
The phone number for Yahoo UK customer service is +44 20 7808 4444. This is displayed if I log in to Yahoo mail then follow My Yahoo > Account Info > Wallet > Forgotten Security Key? I guess you need to have a Yahoo wallet set up for this to appear - in my case this is because I pay them the $25?/year for POP access.

Presumably there's an Australian equivalent, but an Aussie reader will have to help with that one. If you don't mind an international call you could always give the UK one a go!

Posts: 822 | From: Manchester, UK | Registered: Mar 2000  |  IP: Logged
Michael Edwards
Mini Geek
Member # 747

Member Rated:
4
Icon 1 posted March 16, 2004 16:34      Profile for Michael Edwards   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Gibbonboy:
I actually tried to get Yahoo to delete one of my accounts a while back, and received an email from a real person saying that they don't remove accounts in response to user requests. Not sure why, but I thought that once you had an account, it was there for good.

      No - I think it becomes "inactive" after a month or so, and data is removed, but you can reactivate it again by logging in. Then it's cancelled after 3 months - which is irreversible, barring personal help from staff.
      I think this applies to both Hotmail and Yahoo.

quote:
I've let accounts idle for 2 years or more, and I can still log right into them with no problem.
      That seems very unusual and irregular to me. I would have thought the cancellation would be completely automatic, not caused by a human, simply based on how many days since you last logged in.

quote:
I did have a problem with my password once, but changed it and everything works now.
      It was not a password problem with me - I tried changing it, but it didn't help.

quote:
Depending on what your user name is, if the yahoo staff did find it to be offensive in any way, they would indeed block the account. I think it's in their TOS.
      I would not say it was offensive, so much as just rather unusual or eccentric. I do not wish to reveal what it was, because I don't want it to become linked on the web with my real name, and this forum to which I'm now posting is publicly available.
      (I don't know if it's wise or not, but I am using my real name here. When I registered, it never occurred to me to do otherwise - but I notice very few people here use their real name.)

quote:
I've switched now to using myway, no ads and about the same service. I do use yahoo to access my radio club's group, but that's about it anymore.
      I only use Yahoo e-mail for certain groups where I have reason to want to post only under a pseudonym. I know many people use Hotmail or Yahoo for their regular e-mail, but it would send me swiftly insane. I think trying to use web-based e-mail accounts is like trying to swim through treacle. Waiting for screens to appear is like watching the grass grow, or like watching paint dry on walls.


quote:
Originally posted by nekomatic:
The phone number for Yahoo UK customer service is +44 20 7808 4444.
...
Presumably there's an Australian equivalent, but an Aussie reader will have to help with that one. If you don't mind an international call you could always give the UK one a go!

      Yes, I'd give it a try - either the U.K. or U.S. number - but can you imagine what would happen?

      "Welcome to the Yahoo help line. It is very important to us for our valued customers to receive satisfaction. Please press '1' for <blah blah blah>; Please press '2' for <blah blah>..." - each of those options leading to another series of choices, perhaps several layers deep.
...
      "All our service operators are currently busy. Your call is very important to us: please hold the line until one of our operators is available, and we will assist you as soon as we can."
      Then I wait on the phone line for half an hour - if I'm lucky. And then finally, maybe the operator simply gives me the advice on how to change my password that I had already read on the help screens on the Yahoo web site, and which I tried but which didn't work.

      I somehow think an international call to Yahoo would very considerably lighten my pockets - even if I did get satisfaction in the end.
      I might give it a try - maybe my cynical imagination got a bit overactive in the above scenario. But I've written to Yahoo again, and will see if that gets results first.
      My first two e-mails were very detailed and maybe a bit too long (although very precise) - maybe it was just too much for the person to comprehend. This time I write far more concisely, and didn't make reference to my previously unanswered letters.
      I was very polite. I occasionally come across or hear about people who are rude and abusive when trying to seek the help of someone in sorting out a problem - and I am almost disbelieving when they then express astonishment that the other person didn't seem very helpful, in the face of gross rudeness, if not abuse.

                              Regards,
                                Michael.

Posts: 70 | From: Healesville, Victoria, Australia | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
Michael Edwards
Mini Geek
Member # 747

Member Rated:
4
Icon 1 posted March 28, 2004 15:10      Profile for Michael Edwards   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
      Concerning the Yahoo account I began this thread by saying had been deactivated: after several e-mails to Yahoo, they have restored my account, and the e-mail stored there.
      They told me that my account had been closed because of spamming, and the person who replied suggested they would restore it this once, and sort of gave the impression they wouldn't restore it again, and they were making an exception for this case.
      But I never spammed anyone from that account, or from any account at all. I think it's a pretty low-level computer activity, and I would never spam anyone at all.
      I can only conclude that hackers must have accessed my account somehow, and used it to send spam, and that's what Yahoo picked up. I had no idea this was going on, and no way of detecting it.
      What I'm wondering now is this: is there anything I can do to prevent this happening again? Someone suggested to me that I might change my password regularly - but I wonder if this would help. Do hackers need to know my password to use the account? - or can they somehow get around the password and use it anyway?
      Anyway, I'd be glad if anyone could please offer suggestions on what I can do to prevent this happening again.
      Thanks.

                              Regards,
                                Michael.

Posts: 70 | From: Healesville, Victoria, Australia | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
Flashfire
Assimilated
Member # 2616

Member Rated:
4
Icon 1 posted March 29, 2004 14:18      Profile for Flashfire   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Michael Edwards:
      I can only conclude that hackers must have accessed my account somehow, and used it to send spam, and that's what Yahoo picked up. I had no idea this was going on, and no way of detecting it.
      What I'm wondering now is this: is there anything I can do to prevent this happening again? Someone suggested to me that I might change my password regularly - but I wonder if this would help. Do hackers need to know my password to use the account? - or can they somehow get around the password and use it anyway?
      Anyway, I'd be glad if anyone could please offer suggestions on what I can do to prevent this happening again.

There are a couple of things you can do -- first, if you don't check the account very often, start doing so. Most webmail accounts like that let you know a "last login" time, and if it doesn't match when you were last on, let Yahoo know.

Second, look for strange bounces -- if you're getting mail back that you don't remember sending, tell Yahoo. If you let them know there's a problem right away, they're probably going to be more willing to help you with it.

To avoid intrusion in the first place, yes; change the password frequently. Hackers don't necessarily need a password (there are probably ways to bypass it) but passwords are so easy to force or steal that there's no need to fiddle around with backdoors. Check your home machine for spyware, first (programs that log keystrokes, etc.) before you change it, though. The best one I've found is SpyBot from Safer Networking, it finds most of those things and kills 'em for you.

When you do change your password, don't use dictionary words -- adding weird characters as opposed to just letters would up the time it takes a hacker to brute-force a password from a couple minutes to several hours.

Finally, don't open unsolicited attachments. Many spammers use viral programs to send their junk mail; check your machine to make sure you're virus-free. I haven't heard of any viruses that use web-mail accounts, but that doesn't mean they don't exist.

That's about all the advice I have; I hope it helps.

--Flash

--------------------
"No silicon heaven? That's absurd!
Where would all the calculators go?"
--Kryten, Red Dwarf
-------------------------------
My Web Comic: NSTA: Semper Vigilantis

Posts: 368 | From: State of Denial | Registered: Mar 2004  |  IP: Logged
dragonman97

SuperFan!
Member # 780

Member Rated:
4
Icon 1 posted March 29, 2004 16:48      Profile for dragonman97   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
So you mean I shouldn't trust 'drowssap'* for the best security I can afford on my e-mail account? [Wink]

*Credit has to go to a #joyoftech person for that one, previously I'd seen 'toor' on /.. I think I'd just assume use 'password' - I mean it's so obviously stupid, who would be dumb enough to use it, right?

--------------------
There are three things you can be sure of in life: Death, taxes, and reading about fake illnesses online...

Posts: 9331 | From: Westchester County, New York | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
csk

Member # 1941

Member Rated:
5
Icon 1 posted March 29, 2004 17:09      Profile for csk     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I use a whole bunch of asterisks, which fools anyone who is shoulder surfing [Wink]

Actually, if you want to be really paranoid about password security, wander along to diceware and check out their method for choosing passphrases. Not all that hard to remember, but fairly difficult to crack. Of course, not all systems support passphrases that long, but hopefully the important ones will.

--------------------
6 weeks to go!

Posts: 4455 | From: Sydney, Australia | Registered: Jan 2003  |  IP: Logged
The Famous Druid

Gold Hearted SuperFan!
Member # 1769

Member Rated:
4
Icon 1 posted March 29, 2004 18:24      Profile for The Famous Druid     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by dragonman97:
So you mean I shouldn't trust 'drowssap'* for the best security I can afford on my e-mail account? [Wink]

You may laugh, but one former employer had 'letmein' as the standard administrator password on their PC networks.

Another 'Large Computer Manufacturer' had a system engineers password on every box they shipped that was one of the first 10 or so passwords you'd think of.

--------------------
If you watch 'The History Of NASA' backwards, it's about a space agency that has no manned spaceflight capability, then does low-orbit flights, then lands on the Moon.

Posts: 10668 | From: Melbourne, Australia | Registered: Oct 2002  |  IP: Logged
csk

Member # 1941

Member Rated:
5
Icon 1 posted March 29, 2004 18:36      Profile for csk     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Oh, goody, bad password stories time [Big Grin]

One place I was working were converting their desktops from OS/2 to Windows NT. So they installed this heavily locked down version of NT, which annoyed us technical people no end (you couldn't even enable auto-hide on the taskbar). They got a bunch of temporary contractors to do the grunt work of the installs, and they did them after hours. I was working late at my desk, when one of the contractors yelled at the other one across the room "Hey, what's the password again?", and the other one answered. Bingo, instant local admin access to any machine, since they had all the passwords the same. Very handy [Wink]

At the same company, I was working on an EFTPOS project, so I had to deal with a company that makes the keypads where you swipe the card and enter the PIN. Most of the intelligence is actually in those devices, as they take care of the encryption, etc etc. Occasionally, however, the keypad would get stuck in an endless loop, and you'd have to enter a special maintenance menu to reset it, which required a password.

Now, they seemed a bit paranoid about giving me the password, and I wondered whether it might be a standard one. So later, after having left the company, I was in a cab with one of these pinpads, and the driver went into a service station to pay for some petrol. While he was away, I entered the maintenance code, and sure enough, it brought up the menu. I then cleared back out, and pretended nothing had happened. I've forgotten the code now, but it doesn't fill one with confidence (ie given unfettered access to a pinpad, it's possible to do some fraudulent stuff, at least in theory).

--------------------
6 weeks to go!

Posts: 4455 | From: Sydney, Australia | Registered: Jan 2003  |  IP: Logged
nekomatic
SuperFan!
Member # 376

Member Rated:
5
Icon 1 posted March 30, 2004 05:14      Profile for nekomatic     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Michael Edwards:
I can only conclude that hackers must have accessed my account somehow, and used it to send spam, and that's what Yahoo picked up

More likely is that someone you once sent email to got infected by one of the current crop of worms, which tried to spread itself by sending out a message to a randomly chosen address from their mailbox with a fake 'From:' header to make it look like it came from some other randomly chosen address from their mailbox (i.e. yours), and the recipient assumed you had sent them spam and complained to Yahoo who took the knee-jerk action of blocking your account without bothering to investigate. I think it was The Register that tested Hotmail's report-spam-by-a-Hotmail-user address once and concluded that complaints weren't even read by a human (or at least understood by one), just processed automatically, and it wouldn't surprise me at all if Yahoo was the same...
Posts: 822 | From: Manchester, UK | Registered: Mar 2000  |  IP: Logged
sjgault
Single Celled Newbie
Member # 5043

Icon 1 posted April 07, 2006 17:31      Profile for sjgault     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Anyone want to join a class action lawsuit against Yahoo for unexplained deactivation. See my eBay listing or email me.
Posts: 1 | From: Atlanta | Registered: Apr 2006  |  IP: Logged
Michael Edwards
Mini Geek
Member # 747

Member Rated:
4
Icon 1 posted April 07, 2006 18:48      Profile for Michael Edwards   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by sjgault:
Anyone want to join a class action lawsuit against Yahoo for unexplained deactivation. See my eBay listing or email me.

      Golly - I'd almost forgotten about this discussion, although it was I who started it years ago.
      So what problem have you been having with Yahoo?
      I just wonder what this class action would be based on. The service is free, so their obligations to you are probably minimal, and probably covered by their Terms of Service (a lengthy and almost unreadable document, like all such documents).
      Their *real* customers are their advertisers, who pay them money, and it's probably to them that they owe the most in legal obligations; I doubt that free users of their services, who pay nothing, would be regarded, either by them, or by the law, as their real customers, and they probably have few legal obligations to them. (It's only my surmise: I'm not a lawyer; get a lawyer's opinion if you really want to look further into this.)
      So I'm not sure if a class action would get far. I'm in Australia, so it would probably not be practical for me to try to join a class action. I was only affected once, and (perhaps unusually) a polite letter to Yahoo explaining the situation did actually persuade them to restore my account and all its contents.
      Besides, I doubt that I could afford the costs that would probably be involved in pursuing a class action. Lawyers are *expensive*, and probably way beyond my income.

Regards, Michael.

Posts: 70 | From: Healesville, Victoria, Australia | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
Rhonwyyn

Solid Gold SuperFan!
Member # 2854

Member Rated:
4
Icon 1 posted April 07, 2006 18:55      Profile for Rhonwyyn   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Mr. Edwards,

Seeing as the resurrector of this thread didn't post the URL to his eBay listing--or even to a personal Web site--I figured he was just a troll and should be ignored. However, seeing as this is the first time I recall you posting since I joined GC almost two years ago, I'm kinda glad he did.

I'm pleased to make your aquaintance, sir!

~Rhonnie

--------------------
Change the way you SEE, not the way you LOOK!

Posts: 3849 | From: Lancaster, PA | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged
Luke Skywalker
Assimilated
Member # 3096

Member Rated:
3
Icon 3 posted April 07, 2006 21:43      Profile for Luke Skywalker     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Ive had yahoo for years, and never had this problem. Several things though, unless ure paying for the acct, dont expect any help. Second, Id bet its something you sent/did/got blamed for, so fat chance with getting into it.

Good Luck all the same though.

--------------------
Use the Force, Luke.

Posts: 406 | From: The Line Between Time and Space | Registered: Nov 2004  |  IP: Logged
Michael Edwards
Mini Geek
Member # 747

Member Rated:
4
Icon 1 posted April 08, 2006 05:42      Profile for Michael Edwards   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
      Hi, Rhonwyyn.


quote:
Originally posted by Rhonwyyn:
Seeing as the resurrector of this thread didn't post the URL to his eBay listing--or even to a personal Web site--I figured he was just a troll and should be ignored.

      Maybe - I took the comment at face value without thinking about it a lot. But he may have a valid point from a Yahoo user's point of view - the issue of personal accounts and whole groups closing without notice and without obvious reason is in fact a real issue that has stirred up a lot of users.
      I doubt that a class action against Yahoo would get very far, though - as I said before, I doubt that free users have a lot of rights, and you can be sure that Yahoo would have had a whole battery of lawyers scrutinizing their Terms of Service, and ensured that it covered all ordinary situations. But the writer is raising a real issue, and may not be trolling.


quote:
However, seeing as this is the first time I recall you posting since I joined GC almost two years ago, I'm kinda glad he did.

I'm pleased to make your aquaintance, sir!

      Thanks for the welcome, Rhonwyyn.
      I actually joined long before then, maybe 5 or 6 years ago, and I had a flurry of mostly light-hearted posts before you joined, mainly just because I liked the zany humour in some of the threads, and I added a bit to that. (I recall a humorously wacky discussion about what people named their computers.)
      I then tended to fall away, mainly because I try to do far more than I can possibly hope to keep up with, and I came back every now and then to try and remain in touch, read a few things, and posted a message or two - but again fell away each time. So it's quite possible that I haven't been visible here at all since you joined two years ago, and I'm probably quite forgotten now by most of those who knew me - if they are still around (I get the feeling the membership turnover of Geek Culture is quite fast).
      Maybe I'm not a true geek after all, and maybe that's why I've been unable to maintain continuous contact here. A geek, in the sense meant on this site, implies a person knowledgeable in computers, with an ability to master new technology easily, and in many ways I may not fit that description. I used to use MS-DOS exclusively before 1998, and was quite geeky then, even did my own programming in Pascal - but my computer life changed utterly very much for the worse when I changed to Windows in 1998. It was quite traumatic, and I found Windows far more horrible than I expected, and I still haven't got over it, and struggle to maintain control of my computer - and I guess that's not geeky at all. I've thought of switching to Linux, but it seems possible that this may just be beyond me, although opinions of people who've advised me on this have differed about whether it was suitable for me or not.
      So maybe I'm not a true geek at heart after all - but I will try to drop in here every now and then, if I can't do so with complete regularity. In some ways I feel connected to the geek culture of the Internet, even if in some ways I don't fit it.
      But I suppose this is getting off the topic, and doesn't belong in this discussion.

Regards, Michael.

Posts: 70 | From: Healesville, Victoria, Australia | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
Michael Edwards
Mini Geek
Member # 747

Member Rated:
4
Icon 1 posted April 08, 2006 05:51      Profile for Michael Edwards   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
      Hi, Luke. It may not be *quite* so bad as you suggest.


quote:
Originally posted by Luke Skywalker:
Ive had yahoo for years, and never had this problem. Several things though, unless ure paying for the acct, dont expect any help. Second, Id bet its something you sent/did/got blamed for, so fat chance with getting into it.

      I maintain that a polite letter to Yahoo (or several letters if the first one doesn't get what you want) does have some chance of getting the results you want, although this is not certain. On web pages which discuss this problem, I once saw samples of letters people had written to Yahoo (I don't know where they were obtained - perhaps the web page was by an ex-Yahoo staff member), and many of the letters were quite shockingly rude and abrupt, some downright abusive and insulting. I had no idea so many members of the public were routinely so rude as this.
      I expect that such letters would be unlikely to get Yahoo (or anyone at all) to cooperate; rather, just like all of us, the reader of the letter would just dig in their heels, and sort of think to themselves, "Right, if that's the way you're going to be, you can just go to hell - I won't help you at all."
      I never cease to be amazed at the number of people who appear to believe that rudeness and abuse are likely to get cooperation from anyone at all - no matter how justified their actual complaint may be. On the other hand, politeness and an acknowledgement that the other person may have a valid point of view sometimes get you the results you want, even when, according to the rules, you don't have a case at all.

      As to the cause of the problem happening in the first place: if it has been without apparent cause (as it was in my case a few years ago, when I first started this discussion), it seems that the most likely reason is that someone else has somehow hacked into your account and used it to send spam or other material prohibited by the Yahoo Terms of Service, and then someone writes to Yahoo and complains about it, and they then blame you, because it was, after all, from your e-mail address.
      The person who restored my account suggested that a good way of minimizing the chances of this happening again would be to always make sure I log out of my account when I've finished using it. I thought I usually did so anyway, but I was probably lax occasionally, and failed to do so - and that might be when someone else somehow found and used it. I think that is good advice, and I have always tried more carefully to abide by it since then. So far, I've had no more trouble of this sort.


quote:
Good Luck all the same though.
      If the person who recently resurrected this discussion (or anyone else) has this problem, I suggest that they write to Yahoo and calmly (without anger) explain the problem, assure them that you didn't send spam or other objectionable material (if this is true), and ask them why they terminated the account. Adopt the attitude not of someone who has been outrageously wronged and wants to take it out on them (even if that's what you think and feel), but of someone who believes something has gone wrong somehow and who wants to discuss it with them and try to sort the problem out.
      You might also suggest the possibility that someone else abused your account, and it was they who did the offending actions, not you. If you sound reasonable enough about it, there's a chance they may believe you and restore your account. Asking them what steps you can take to prevent this happening again may persuade them that you are serious about preventing a recurrence, and make them more sympathetic to your situation.
      If they don't reply, or give only a general reply that doesn't address the particular points you raised, try writing again, repeating the points, maybe in slightly different wording. Say you mentioned such-and-such a point in your previous letter, but it was not addressed in the reply. (In my limited experience, if you write to Yahoo, you have an excellent chance of getting a reply, and quite promptly, too - the problem will more likely be that the reply feels a bit like a form letter, made up of pre-written paragraphs which either tell you things you already know, or which seem a bit vague and don't apply to the specific situation you wrote to them about.)
      Don't give up easily. If you have to write to the Yahoo help service, you're unlikely to be attended to by the same person twice anyway - so if you don't have luck with one person, you may get better luck with someone else. It can take some time and effort to finally get where you want to get.
      In my case, I did have to go a bit beyond the regular help service in the Yahoo site: my first attempts using this got nowhere; but I then looked up local contact details for Yahoo in the White Pages web site for Australia (http://www.whitepages.com.au), and wrote to a different e-mail address that I found there - and I was actually attended to by the same person twice. So this was not the usual assembly-line-style help service with a whole battery of people answering hundreds of questions, and seemed more like someone's personal e-mail address I'd got through to.
      It was this person who restored my account. She did say she would restore it "this time", seeming to suggest that normally she wouldn't, but was making an exception this time, and may not do so next time if it happened again. But if it's true that *someone else* hacking into your account and using it for spamming is sufficient under the rules to get your account terminated, then to have the Yahoo person make an exception for you is exactly what you want. It means that you've convinced them that you are sincere, and probably right, in your explanation, and therefore deserve not to have the literal letter of the rules applied in your case.
      I would suggest that, if the normal help line fails, you may like to similarly look up contacts for Yahoo local to your country or area, and try that.

      A couple of pieces of advice for anyone who uses Yahoo:
      Don't keep your only copy anything you'd hate to lose in a Yahoo account; either transfer it to your own computer, or at least keep a back-up on your own computer. That way, what might be a disastrous loss of data becomes only the inconvenience of being unable to use your account - because you can always start another.
      If you own a Yahoo group, join the group under another address and make that address a co-owner of the group. There can be two owners of a group, and an owner has full powers, more than a moderator does - so if you lose one account, you still have control via the other address, and it would be astronomically unlikely for Yahoo to delete both addresses at the same time. And the other address need not be a Yahoo one anyway.

Regards, Michael.

Posts: 70 | From: Healesville, Victoria, Australia | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged


All times are Eastern Time  
Post New Topic  New Poll  Post A Reply Close Topic    Move Topic    Delete Topic next oldest topic   next newest topic
 - Printer-friendly view of this topic
Hop To:

Contact Us | Geek Culture Home Page

2015 Geek Culture

Powered by Infopop Corporation
UBB.classicTM 6.4.0



homeGeek CultureWebstoreeCards!Forums!Joy of Tech!AY2K!webcam