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T O P I C     R E V I E W
californiarockr
Member # 1986
 - posted May 30, 2005 23:39
So I got hired by cyber gaming network- www.cgno.com. It is my friend's website, but he doesn't do the hiring (although he may have helped me a bit). Anyways, I am now an official writer for Nintendo articles, do some basic graphics, and am working on the site's custom CMS/backend. It is really a lot of fun so far. Currently, I am not writing reviews, because Jarrett (my friend) needs more help with the actual coding rather than stuff that most gamers could do. The pay sucks hard- I have to supply most of the games I want to write about, occasionally I will get a free game to review (but I will be paying some part of those to help him with the shipping). I am not doing it for the games though, mostly for the experience, the resume reference, and the tickets to E3 (which I just barely missed this year [Frown] ). Also, if I ever want to be a writer for a gaming magazine or something, its nice to have a job in the industry before my college internships and whatnot.


I am quite excited, they are a fairly respectable site (the server crashed during E3, they were one of the first sites, if not the first site, to get official PS3 pictures up from E3. The server died hard, and it died quick).

EDIT: Header taken down already. Mad rush of articles after E3. And the reason they are doing so much coding is because we are upgrading the entire site. Rewriting the CMS from scratch, brand new database, everything. Fun times ahead.


When that disappears, the article is here:
www.cgno.com/games/699.html#preview


I am really not proud of that article, it took me less than an hour to do all the research and write it, and it shows. Oh well, my next one will be better.
 
drunkennewfiemidget
Member # 2814
 - posted May 31, 2005 04:47
Congrats on the new job!
 
Tut-an-Geek
Member # 1234
 - posted May 31, 2005 18:37
Congrats, but a quick word from the wise:
your favorite friend with CMS's is caching. if you write something new, make sure that you either 1 - output all changes to static .html files, 2 - cache to files and then just read those caches, or install my best friend, turck mmcache. turck has given us (ackoo) dramatic performance increases in every dynamic PHP app, from mambo [which already caches to files] (ie, macmod) to the always-but-not-with-turck slow Gallery2 (ie, my pix site).
 
dragonman97
Member # 780
 - posted May 31, 2005 18:49
I'll second Tut's advice - there is *no* good reason to dynamically generate every page your visitor sees. It's a waste of CPU cycles, and slows page load. I recently read an advice piece online that pretty much said what Tut said - use mod_rewrite or something else to cause your all your links to work in directory structures and with .html, and then do an export of your dynamically generated pages every so often.
 
csk
Member # 1941
 - posted May 31, 2005 18:55
quote:
Originally posted by dragonman97:
I'll second Tut's advice - there is *no* good reason to dynamically generate every page your visitor sees. It's a waste of CPU cycles, and slows page load. I recently read an advice piece online that pretty much said what Tut said - use mod_rewrite or something else to cause your all your links to work in directory structures and with .html, and then do an export of your dynamically generated pages every so often.

That's exactly right. Unless you've got a swarm of machines that you need to utilise, though. Then you start getting into the multiple backend web application server/database stuff, which is pretty hairy. Having played around with WebSphere, I've yet to work out why anyone would use such an overengineered, complex, unreliable and buggy system.
 
drunkennewfiemidget
Member # 2814
 - posted June 01, 2005 05:23
My personal site works exactly like that -- regenerates its new articles every 15 minutes into static pages, and only modifies them if the modified timestamp has incremented since last run.
 
Aditu
Member # 2340
 - posted June 03, 2005 07:23
congrats on the new job. It sounds like you will have lots of fun.
 




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