homeGeek CultureWebstoreeCards!Forums!Joy of Tech!AY2K!webcam

Forum Home Post A Reply

my profile | directory login | | search | faq | forum home


» The Geek Culture Forums » Other Geeky Stuff » Ask a Geek! » storage » Post A Reply


Post A Reply
Login Name:
Password (max 13 characters):
Message Icon: Icon 1     Icon 2     Icon 3     Icon 4     Icon 5     Icon 6     Icon 7    
Icon 8     Icon 9     Icon 10     Icon 11     Icon 12     Icon 13     Icon 14    
Message:

HTML is not enabled.
UBB Code™ is enabled.

 

Instant Graemlins Instant UBB Code™
Smile   Frown   Embarrassed   Big Grin   Wink   Razz  
Cool   Roll Eyes   Mad   Eek!   Confused   Happytears  
blush   Beard of Peter Gabriel!   crazy   tired   ohwell   evil  
shake head   cry baby   hearts   weep   devil wand   thumbsup  
thumbsdown   Geek   Applause   Angel   Envy    
Insert URL Hyperlink - UBB Code™   Insert Email Address - UBB Code™
Bold - UBB Code™   Italics - UBB Code™
Quote - UBB Code™   Code Tag - UBB Code™
List Start - UBB Code™   List Item - UBB Code™
List End - UBB Code™   Image - UBB Code™

What is UBB Code™?
Options


Disable Graemlins in this post.


 


T O P I C     R E V I E W
angryjungman
Member # 2434
 - posted September 21, 2004 17:56
I'm looking for a way to conviently organise and store my spare computer parts [cables, Ethernet cards, etc.]. Does anyone have any suggestions?
 
drunkennewfiemidget
Member # 2814
 - posted September 21, 2004 18:06
I'd be interested to hear suggestions on that one myself. I have so many spare computers and computer parts it's not even funny. I should probably just sell it all, but it's probably more useful to me over time than it's monetarily worth.
 
The Famous Druid
Member # 1769
 - posted September 21, 2004 18:19
A friend of mine has quite an interesting solution to this problem.

He bought some of those clear plastic CD holders, the ones that are like a big sheet of (about 36) CD-sized pockets, designed to hang on a door.

They're just the right size to hold small circuit boards, cables, connectors, batteries, and of course CDs. You can slip a bit of paper in behind the item describing what it is (all small circuit boards look alike to me).

It's kind of the geek equivalent to the old tradesmans 'shadow board'.
 
Mac D
Member # 2926
 - posted September 22, 2004 06:28
My wife made me move all my parts and "Extra" computers to a closet in the basement. I don't think of them as Extra computers I need them. All that I have out right now is my old Gateway Performance 500 A Powerbook 3400c and the iBook. She likes to have the desktop and we keep the 3400c out because it's small and I can put it anyplace. And of course the iBook is a no brainer, That one is a necesity. But my point is I think you should get a work shop and keep all your parts and "Extra" Computers there. We are looking for a house and I am making a point to have my own work shop. I'm going to be using bins from target or walmart to keep stuff in. but it will still be out and accessable. Ok I'm done ranting. But of course ranting is better then working. hehe
 
quantumfluff
Member # 450
 - posted September 22, 2004 07:43
I reuse cardboard shipping boxes. I write the contents on the side in big black magic marker and put them on the shelf in the basement. For shelving I use the heavy duty knockdown stuff from Home Depot. Of course, if you're having trouble coming up with a solution this obvious, then you either have *a lot* of parts, or you should read a book on managing clutter.

Thread hijack.....

Do you sort your Lego by original set, or all together?
If together, by brick shape or color? Or, do you have so many pieces (like my brother) that you end up with a 300 drawer bin so you can locate exactly what part you want in 2 seconds? To some, this is almost as an important religious issue as vi vs. emacs.
 
Snaggy
Member # 123
 - posted September 22, 2004 08:08
I find clear storage containers, (clear tops and sides) are the best, as you can see the stuff in them.... saves a ton of time in the long run. You can find these in all kinds of sizes, but go for the clear!

For adapters, I use a clear jars. For little things, like shipping labels and stickers, (could also apply to computer parts or connectors) I use the clear plastic business card and pamplet holders that you can find at Office Depot or Staples.
 
Mac D
Member # 2926
 - posted September 22, 2004 08:16
Also for small parts (screws bolts and the like) Baby food jars are perfect.
 
littlefish
Member # 966
 - posted September 22, 2004 08:26
[quote]A friend of mine has quite an interesting solution to this problem.

He bought some of those clear plastic CD holders, the ones that are like a big sheet of (about 36) CD-sized pockets, designed to hang on a door.

They're just the right size to hold small circuit boards, cables, connectors, batteries, and of course CDs. You can slip a bit of paper in behind the item describing what it is (all small circuit boards look alike to me).[quote]

Admittedly I don't have that many spare parts around, so it's not a problem for me, but this sounds like a bad idea to me for static reasons. I used to work at research machines (UK computer builder) and the lengths we had to go to for the prevention of static discharge on the poor little circuit boards make me think it is a legitimate worry. YMMV.
 
Xanthine
Member # 736
 - posted September 22, 2004 09:33
An engineering student I know keeps the amplifiers he's built in little plastic jars on a shelf. I can't really tell what's what though because the jars are labeled in his mother tongue, if they're labeled at all.
 
dragonman97
Member # 780
 - posted September 22, 2004 15:42
At home, I have recently gone about the process of organizing my computer-related parts (incl. networking). It goes like this: All working parts go in one drawer - valid Cat-5 that is terminated on both ends, floppy drives, reasonably current network cards, mice, a few power cords, and cables (that again, are properly terminated). All 'curious' parts are in another drawer - this included scrap Cat-5 cable (one or both end(s) cut either with cutters, my knife, or ripped across something rough), broken stuff for future pet projects (like various-sized hard drives, such that I might build one of these some day, RJ-45 connectors that have seen better days (but might still be punchable for a special cable), a "wireless" mouse I keep for grins, a busted CD-ROM drive or two intended for evil purposes, documentation for various products, old network cards (10Base2 & 10Base-T for both PCI & ISA), and various other stuff that I don't even know that I have. I did through out a bit of stuff, and both drawers close, so I'm happy [Smile] . At work, I reuse cardboard boxes (not computers, so I shain't say 'boxen') from stuff we've gotten, marking them with a permanent marker, and storing/stacking on proper shelving. I also have some tech 'trinkets' on a chalkboard ledge right behind my desk - opened HD [makes a wicked mirror to see approachine people], floppy disks in various states of disarray as educational tools (standard spiel - "*THIS* is what you're storing your files on, a piece of magnetically charged mylar" [bend cookie between fingers for effect]), and various other curiosities (and a fscking colleague of mine is giving me crap about having too much stuff - but it gives some some sense of personal space and sanity, so she can just buzz off - she's got stuff at her desk, just neater).

*end completely drivel-laden post*
:wq
 
ora
Member # 2769
 - posted September 22, 2004 16:38
Note to thread hijacker-
I recently went to a business strategy research centre in Switzerland that used Lego as a business tool. Every meeting room had endless huge boxes of bricks for people to use, not organsied at all. They claimed that the searching for bits and randomness of the pieces to hand was helpful in letting people build things more naturally.

Back on topic,- i favor the huge bewildering box of bits approach- it makes every search for an odd cable an exciting adventure. [Smile]
 




Contact Us | Geek Culture Home Page

© 2015 Geek Culture

Powered by Infopop Corporation
UBB.classicTM 6.4.0



homeGeek CultureWebstoreeCards!Forums!Joy of Tech!AY2K!webcam