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Posted by Mander (Member # 4816) on January 14, 2006, 13:17:
 
I keep finding myself strangely drawn here, following links from Slashdot. (A friend told me about Slashdot and I've been an avid reader for a few months now).

I think I'm more of a geek groupie than an outright geek myself. I use a Mac, and proudly, but cannot participate in all levels of Macüberness because I'm only on OS 10.2. I'm flirting with the idea of Linux, but have to get my master's thesis completed and turned in before I start mucking around in my computer.

Love to hear people talk tech, as long as they don't mind my endless barrage of questions. I have a very large curiosity that aches to be satisfied. Very much enjoy the philosophical/conjecture aspects of science, but my secret shame is that I am not at all mathy.

Recent turnons: Battlestar Galactica, Firefly, in a real "Rush" phase right now brought about by the gifting of an mp3 player at the holidays. A friend got me into Sudoku, which is about as much number stuff as I can handle.

I like LEGOs and peanut butter Cap'n Crunch. I let the Christmas tree be decorated with red and white Pokémon balls one year. I listen to Weird Al and have even seen him in concert. If PeeWee's Playhouse ever makes it to TVLand, I'm DVRing it.

Looking forward to being here!!
 
Posted by nerdwithnofriends (Member # 3773) on January 14, 2006, 13:29:
 
Welcome! Have fun and stay active here!
 
Posted by Snaggy (Member # 123) on January 14, 2006, 13:41:
 
Welcome Mander! [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Grummash (Member # 4289) on January 14, 2006, 14:20:
 
Welcome to the forums Mander. [Smile]

Stick around and enjoy, and don't feel bad about "only" having OS X 10.2 - some of us really like our little Jaguars [Razz]
 
Posted by Mander (Member # 4816) on January 14, 2006, 14:34:
 
Thank you nerdwithnofriends, Snaggy, and Grummash.

Grummash, yes, Jaguar is reliable, but I can't do cool stuff like Google earth and dl'ing X11 so's I can run The GIMP, not to mention all kind of music things I get locked out of (thank you, iTunes! [said in the tone of "Oh, thank you, LA-tin!" quoted by one Crow T. Robot])

But I'm quite pleased with everything else it can do. I'm quite fond of my fruitMac! It's purplicious.

Hey, any other MST3K fans here? </me scans crowd>
 
Posted by nerdwithnofriends (Member # 3773) on January 14, 2006, 16:08:
 
quote:
Originally posted by Mander:
Thank you nerdwithnofriends, Snaggy, and Grummash.

Grummash, yes, Jaguar is reliable, but I can't do cool stuff like Google earth and dl'ing X11 so's I can run The GIMP, not to mention all kind of music things I get locked out of (thank you, iTunes! [said in the tone of "Oh, thank you, LA-tin!" quoted by one Crow T. Robot])

But I'm quite pleased with everything else it can do. I'm quite fond of my fruitMac! It's purplicious.

Hey, any other MST3K fans here? </me scans crowd>

There should be an X11 installer package on the last install disk. I remember I had X11 on my Jaguar installation so I could try and port some linux apps.

And if that fails, try looking in to the Fink project on sourceforge.
 
Posted by Mander (Member # 4816) on January 14, 2006, 17:19:
 
[/QUOTE]There should be an X11 installer package on the last install disk. [/QB][/QUOTE]

Oh yeah, the installer disk! <eyes brightening> Yeah, uh, I know where that is. Sure.

Does it matter that my CD drive is old and cranky? </me bangs head on desk>
 
Posted by dragonman97 (Member # 780) on January 14, 2006, 17:23:
 
nwnf: I'm pretty sure X11 was only bundled w/10.3 & 10.4. I /think/ the installer works on Jag, though - just Google 'Apple X11,' and check it out (and see if it'll run). Otherwise, get the open source version. I'm running Tiger, though, so um....sorry. :-/ [Razz]
 
Posted by littlefish (Member # 966) on January 15, 2006, 01:34:
 
Apple did supply an official X11 for a while which could be downloaded. Then it was on the CD's for later releases. You may still be able to download it for free from apple.
 
Posted by Steen (Member # 170) on January 15, 2006, 06:30:
 
Welcome to the forums

Out of curiousity, what are you a perfesser of?
 
Posted by Mander (Member # 4816) on January 15, 2006, 07:42:
 
You may still be able to download it for free from apple. [/QUOTE]

From the my research into this issue:

Q: Where can I download X11 for Mac OS X?
A: X11 is included on the standard distribution of Mac OS X 10.3 client. User must do a custom install and select X11 package.

and

Q: Is the X11 beta for Jaguar still available?
A: Now that we have released X11 1.0 for Panther, we have ended our highly-successful beta process

Jeez, now I hafta pay for it!! :mad face:

Steen, I am a perfesser of Spanish at our local college-within-the-university-system. Before you become all impressed with that, please realize my correct title is "Adjunct Lecturer", which means that I teach fewer than four classes per semester, and I get paid in peanuts, though the college can (and does!) charge the students the same amount per credit hour. 46% of the faculty of my college is made up of adjuncts.

I'm really a high school teacher, waiting on finishing my thesis for the master's degree I need for the privilege of continuing to teach in this beautiful, overtaxed, overregulated, economically depressed area.

I'MSOCLOSE!
 
Posted by garlicguy (Member # 3166) on January 15, 2006, 10:11:
 
Howdy, Mander.  -
Welcome to GC Forums. Nice intro, btw. Stick around, have fun and post often.

I think it's great that you are teaching in the system you describe. And don't sweat the money - it's overrated anyway. [thumbsup]

gg
 
Posted by Mander (Member # 4816) on January 15, 2006, 10:38:
 
quote:


And don't sweat the money - it's overrated anyway.

Good! Then you won't mind if I borrow some? I need a haircut.

Where's the "hand extended, palm up" icon when ya need it?

[Thanks, gg. I can't NOT be a teacher now.... I'm addicted!]
 
Posted by garlicguy (Member # 3166) on January 15, 2006, 12:28:
 
"Give someone money for a haircut, and they'll look chic for a week. Tell 'em to cut it themselves and they can look like hell for a lifetime..." -Me
 
Posted by Mander (Member # 4816) on January 15, 2006, 19:33:
 
Yay! Lifetime!
 
Posted by Steen (Member # 170) on January 15, 2006, 20:26:
 
Mander wrote:
Steen, I am a perfesser of Spanish at our local college-within-the-university-system. Before you become all impressed with that, please realize my correct title is "Adjunct Lecturer", which means that I teach fewer than four classes per semester, and I get paid in peanuts, though the college can (and does!) charge the students the same amount per credit hour. 46% of the faculty of my college is made up of adjuncts.

I'm really a high school teacher, waiting on finishing my thesis for the master's degree I need for the privilege of continuing to teach in this beautiful, overtaxed, overregulated, economically depressed area.


Atually, that sounds far more impressive than someone who works as a professor at a college level and dumps off most of the workload on others. Intelligence and capability are always more impressive when used to accomplish things rather than just sitting around talking while having others do them.
 
Posted by Mander (Member # 4816) on January 15, 2006, 20:52:
 
quote:
when used to accomplish things rather than just sitting around talking while having others do them
/me nods knowingly

That exact situation exists within my overall department, on both the Spanish and French sides. It burns me to see an incredibly talented and dedicated gentleman I know who teaches all three of his classes well and enjoys his students, while his 'superior' has trouble dealing with two classes with eight students TOTAL enrollment and doesn't even like her students.

But she has the credentials and is therefore more 'valuable' to the college than he is (with his 37 years of experience versus her, um, eight).
 
Posted by MacManKrisK (Member # 955) on January 15, 2006, 22:29:
 
Mander: welcome to the Geek Culture forums! As a free gift: here is X11 v. 1.0 from Apple's web site.

All I had to do was search "download X11" on Apple's site and click the first link that came up...
 
Posted by The Famous Druid (Member # 1769) on January 16, 2006, 04:12:
 
Greeting Mander, I'm a professional Sudoku solver m'self, Battlestar Galactica fan, and occasional student of Spanish.

( I also quite like nerdy horny chicks [evil] )

So, pull up a pew, coffees on the stove, cake's in the fridge, and the good scotch is on the high shelf behind the large pile of old Byte magazines.
 
Posted by Alan! (Member # 1261) on January 16, 2006, 05:05:
 
aw man, so i've been drinking vodka all this time for nuthin'?
 
Posted by Stormtalon (Member # 1163) on January 16, 2006, 06:26:
 
Ahh, Spanish classes, how well I remember them. Went thru AP Spanish in high school, back in the day. Alas, now I can barely speak a lick of it. I blame the year I spent in Eastern Europe, 'cause every time I try to speak Spanish, it comes out Bulgarian instead.

Now the real question is -- are you gonna be the kind of teacher who will drop-kick a student into the foreign country of their choice? "No, really, you should travel a bit, broaden your horizons. Off to Spain with you!" *PUNT*

[Big Grin]
 
Posted by Mander (Member # 4816) on January 16, 2006, 07:27:
 
quote:
Originally posted by MacManKrisK:
Mander: welcome to the Geek Culture forums! As a free gift: here is X11 v. 1.0 from Apple's web site.

All I had to do was search "download X11" on Apple's site and click the first link that came up...

Thank you so much.


System Requirements

-Mac OS X 10.3 through 10.3.9

I'll try it.... I don't appear to have the correct system requirements, however, which is what stopped me from trying to download it in the first place. Doesn't that
stink?

Thanks, Druid....I'm so glad this is a pew and not a kneeler. Oooh, cake!!

Stormtalon, what an amazing experience you had!! And I can empathize with the whole "which second language comes out first" thing. I do recommend travel as the second best way to learn a language (the first is living there and the third is speding time with a family that uses it almost exclusively), but i'd never force any of my students out of their comfort zone. Unnecessary stress blocks acquisition.

Have you kept up your Bulgarian since returning?
 
Posted by CommanderShroom (Member # 2097) on January 16, 2006, 07:41:
 
Welcome to GC, Mander.

I know a couple Spanish phrases. But I cannot repeat them in polite company. [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Matias (Member # 4216) on January 16, 2006, 10:31:
 
Mander....you seem to be blending in well. Nice to have you join us.
 
Posted by Moe Monkey (Member # 1900) on January 16, 2006, 10:43:
 
quote:
Originally posted by The Famous Druid:
...I'm a professional Sudoku solver m'self...

Hey, neat -- I've gotten pretty good on the amateur circuit, any tips for going pro? [Wink]

...And welcome, Mander -- I'm a HS teacher, too.

Moe
 
Posted by Mander (Member # 4816) on January 16, 2006, 11:40:
 
CommanderShroom, well, it's a good thing this is a very mixed crowd, then, huh?

/me leans forward, cupped hand to ear

Thank you, Matias! This is a real friendly group from what I've seen so far.

MoeMonkey, are you a professional geek, or is your content area something like Social Studies or English, in which case, like me, you're an amateur geek?

I think I vaguely remember something in the heading that said "Explain how you got your nickname." I had a boyfriend whose family was from New Jersey, and his mom used to call me by my given name but it always came out "Amander." So, it got shortened, and that's where I am now.
 
Posted by Stormtalon (Member # 1163) on January 16, 2006, 12:31:
 
Yeah, I keep up with my Bulgarian fairly well. Helps that my ex-wife is Bulgarian, and we talk quite a bit. I suppose I'm what you'd call "functionally fluent." I can keep up a decent casual conversation, but when stuff goes into the more technical or culture-specific, I start to get lost.

As for the drop-kick, well, I have a former English professor to thank for my having travelled in the first place. I'd recently graduated college and was unsure what to do next, when the following conversation took place:

Her: "Say, I got this e-mail from a program to teach conversational English in Bulgaria for a year. All you need is a bachelor's degree. Interested?"

Me: "Hmmm. Sure, what the hell!"

Six weeks later, I was on the ground in Sofia, the capital, having flown there on a one-way ticket.

(Handy travel tip: a one-way ticket is a good way to make sure you don't chicken out once you get there.)

[Big Grin]
 
Posted by The Famous Druid (Member # 1769) on January 16, 2006, 13:04:
 
quote:
Originally posted by Moe Monkey:
quote:
Originally posted by The Famous Druid:
...I'm a professional Sudoku solver m'self...

Hey, neat -- I've gotten pretty good on the amateur circuit, any tips for going pro? [Wink]
1. Get some sudokus.
2. Be in a job where there's often no real work to do.
 
Posted by Mander (Member # 4816) on January 16, 2006, 16:26:
 
Stormtalon, are you saying that you met your wife in Bulgaria? Or did you have the bizarre experience of going and teaching there for a year, then coming back and meeting/marrying someone from Bulgaria?

My dad worked evenings as a corrections officer and got a LOT of reading done in his 32 years of employment with the state. I wonder if he would have liked sudoku, too...
 
Posted by Moe Monkey (Member # 1900) on January 16, 2006, 20:53:
 
quote:
Originally posted by Mander:
MoeMonkey, are you a professional geek, or is your content area something like Social Studies or English, in which case, like me, you're an amateur geek?

I teach science, so I guess that makes me a professional geek, although I've been accused of being an "arts fanboy" on a few occasions.

TFD, given your second requirement for turning Sudoku Pro, I guess it'll have to wait for retirement... [Frown]
 
Posted by Stormtalon (Member # 1163) on January 17, 2006, 08:09:
 
Yep, met her while I was over there, and no, wasn't one of my students. Kind of a long, odd story, really.

As a side note, in the town I was assigned to, I was only one of three native English speakers around. One was a hysterically sly British lady who taught in the other school in town, and the other was a fellow from Tanzania. I had rather little choice but to learn Bulgarian in order to navigate the town.

Stormtalon's helpful travel hint of the day:

When planning on living in a different country for any extended period of time, there are two critical portions of the native language that you need to learn before anything else:

1) Food names, so you know what it is that you're ordering at a restaurant or buying in the market.

2) The number and money names, so you know how much you're going to be paying for that sheep-stomach soup you just ordered....

[Big Grin]
 
Posted by dragonman97 (Member # 780) on January 17, 2006, 09:17:
 
Hmm....Sudoku...haven't done that in a while. Curse you folks for reminding me about it. [Wink]

/me just downloaded this months sudoku.com contest page, and printed it up @ 250%. I guess I know what I'll be methodically working on over lunch today.

(I did it once before, and I'm happy to say I got it right the first time, but it took me awhile to get into the groove of it.)
 
Posted by Mander (Member # 4816) on January 17, 2006, 15:22:
 
quote:
Originally posted by Stormtalon:
Yep, met her while I was over there, and no, wasn't one of my students. Kind of a long, odd story, really.

Nothing could be odder than Steen's date (sorry, dude, but it was funny...maybe not at the time, but wow!).

quote:

As a side note, in the town I was assigned to, I was only one of three native English speakers around. One was a hysterically sly British lady

Ooh, I wanna hear more about this!!


quote:

1) Food names, so you know what it is that you're ordering at a restaurant or buying in the market.

What? Sausages made of tripe don't delight you?
 
Posted by Mander (Member # 4816) on January 17, 2006, 15:26:
 
quote:
Originally posted by Moe Monkey:
quote:


I teach science, so I guess that makes me a professional geek, although I've been accused of being an "arts fanboy" on a few occasions.


Yay! Science! What flavor? MS or HS? Are you satisfied with your lab or do you feel much of what you need mysteriously shows up in the budget as new bleacher seats?

I'm a big fan of Alexander Calder, myself.
 
Posted by Moe Monkey (Member # 1900) on January 17, 2006, 18:55:
 
quote:
Originally posted by Mander:
Yay! Science! What flavor? MS or HS? Are you satisfied with your lab or do you feel much of what you need mysteriously shows up in the budget as new bleacher seats?

I teach HS science, physics and chemistry. I'm not a big fan of our current chem lab as it is long overdue for a renovation (going on perhaps 30 years old or more) -- ventilation is poor and the school was originally constructed as open concept, so the classroom next door gets all the noise and fumes. Guess where I teach?!

Budget is always an issue, but I don't feel we're particularly hard done by. The distribution of money seems pretty fair -- we're an academic school with a pretty rabid sports program, so everyone gets their share.
 
Posted by Mander (Member # 4816) on January 17, 2006, 19:34:
 
quote:
Guess where I teach?!
Oh man, I suck at these kinds of questions.... I always feel inadequate, like there is some hidden piece of knowledge that I should have picked up and didn't.

The only open design school I've ever actually seen in person was .... in..... the Ithaca area.

Otherwise I'd have to guess Long Island or California. Maybe Washington, one'a those more progressive states.

Open concept....yeesh.
 
Posted by Stormtalon (Member # 1163) on January 18, 2006, 08:36:
 
quote:
Originally posted by Mander:
quote:

As a side note, in the town I was assigned to, I was only one of three native English speakers around. One was a hysterically sly British lady

Ooh, I wanna hear more about this!!

She was a late-middle-aged gal, mid to late 40s, as I recall; she once showed me a pic of her daughter who was about my age. More than slightly cynical, she was, too.

The most memorable piece of advice that she gave me was, "You can't spend a year in another country and not bonk at least once. It just won't do!" She practiced what she preached, too. How do I know? Well, being that I was one of only two other native English speakers in the entire town, I wound up being the one to hear about her love life. With the gossip network around the town, if she'd told her local colleagues, well... the THREE guys she was juggling at the time would have found out about each other. I also distinctly remember her saying, "I love being the older woman. I get to train 'em in right!"

quote:

1) Food names, so you know what it is that you're ordering at a restaurant or buying in the market.

What? Sausages made of tripe don't delight you?
Sausages, I could probably live with. Boiled tripe soup -- now that's just plain nasty. The funny bit is, I'd written that advice as part of a series of articles I sent back to my college newspaper as slightly tongue-in-cheek travel advice columns. Well after I'd written that, and on what should have been my last day in the country (my departure ended up being delayed a week) we stopped at a small roadside cafe for lunch. I ordered a soup -- "shkembe chorba" thinking I was going to be getting the bean soup I'd found I liked so much. Nope. Sheep-stomach soup it was. I looked at it, tasted it, shuddered and thought, "Damn. Hoist by my own petard."

'Course, that was small-time strangeness, compared to the train-trip from Hell I took while I was over there....

Stormtalon
 
Posted by Stormtalon (Member # 1163) on January 18, 2006, 08:41:
 
quote:
Originally posted by Mander:
quote:
Guess where I teach?!
Oh man, I suck at these kinds of questions.... I always feel inadequate, like there is some hidden piece of knowledge that I should have picked up and didn't.

I think the answer he's looking for is "In that classroom next door where all the fumes wind up."

[Smile]
 
Posted by Ugh, MightyClub (Member # 3112) on January 18, 2006, 12:14:
 
quote:
Originally posted by Mander:
The only open design school I've ever actually seen in person was .... in..... the Ithaca area.

If by "open design" you mean there are no walls between spaces... I've never seen such a thing, but apparently the city I grew up in almost built such a thing. They had the land and the state was set to foot something like 75% of the bill, but the district bailed at the last minute. Good thing, I say. How can you really learn in such an environment? (Fill me in, Moe!) Anyway, that was back in the late 60's, early 70's, before I was born, or when I was very young. I suspect mind altering substances had something to do with the design process. They finally did build a new high school, on their own dime. It opened this past September and my younger brother got to try it out for a couple weeks before my parents moved. We almost had a clean two-generation sweep on the old HS, for what that's worth.

Ahem. Anyway, that's all the rambling I have for now.
 
Posted by Mander (Member # 4816) on January 18, 2006, 12:30:
 
I think the answer he's looking for is "In that classroom next door where all the fumes wind up."




 -
 
Posted by Mander (Member # 4816) on January 18, 2006, 12:35:
 
[/QUOTE]If by "open design" you mean there are no walls between spaces... I've never seen such a thing, but apparently the city I grew up in almost built such a thing. They had the land and the state was set to foot something like 75% of the bill, but the district bailed at the last minute. Good thing, I say. How can you really learn in such an environment? (Fill me in, Moe!) Anyway, that was back in the late 60's, early 70's, before I was born, or when I was very young. I suspect mind altering substances had something to do with the design process. They finally did build a new high school, on their own dime. It opened this past September and my younger brother got to try it out for a couple weeks before my parents moved. We almost had a clean two-generation sweep on the old HS, for what that's worth.

Ahem. Anyway, that's all the rambling I have for now. [/QB][/QUOTE]

The school was slightly outside of town, an elementary dealio, and I was there for a foreign language conference. One of the other attendees who had worked there at one point said the building had originally been an open concept, but after they discovered it wasn't conducive to learning, they put up cinderblock walls ("Ugly!" he said).

The library in that building was almost smack-dab in the middle.

There is a very good possiblity that I am just mixing up my facts, too. Those neural pathways get all tired the older you get.
 
Posted by Sxeptomaniac (Member # 3698) on January 18, 2006, 17:09:
 
A belated welcome to you, Mander.

I also work in higher education, though I work in the physical plant, AKA maintenance. It's a smaller private institution, so they don't have the luxury of paying professors who don't do the work themselves, though.

Out of curiousity, do you generally teach Castilian Spanish or the Latin American dialect?
 
Posted by Xanthine (Member # 736) on January 18, 2006, 20:49:
 
Hi!

I'm a lab rat. I'm a grad student in biochemistry, so my university pays me like an employee and then kicks me around like a student. Actually, now taht I think about it, the university doesn't pay em a dime. First my advisor was paying me from his grants, and then I won a training grant so now the NIH pays me. Yet I am still a university employee. Hmmm.

I sometimes wonder where I fit onb the geek spectrum. I'm a more of a biogeek than a computer geek, and turning into more and more of a crystallography wonk by the day. I get along equally badly with PCs, Macs, and *nix boxes. Seriously, I crashed a SGI by closing a text editor. I do enjoy command lines though. And I get to play with liquid nitrogen and some really cool toys. [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Mander (Member # 4816) on January 19, 2006, 04:55:
 
Sxeptomaniac, I teach what I was taught, Latin Americanized Spanish, using my borrowed-appropriated Argentinian and Dominican accents that overlay my French accent. Overall, 'my' students seem to happy with the course. I take a non-textbook storytelling approach.

Xanthine, well, are you having fun doing what you're doing in that netherworld between full employment status and unpaid wonk status? The toys are almost worth it, but I'm not sure you can eat crystalline structures (unless we're talking sugar, huh?)
 
Posted by supaboy (Member # 183) on January 19, 2006, 11:35:
 
quote:
Originally posted by Moe Monkey:
...the school was originally constructed as open concept...

The high school I went to was also "open concept". Fortunately, there were partition walls up between all the classrooms. Unfortunately, every classroom was triangular, which puts some constraint on how well you can accomodate a given number of students.


quote:
Originally posted by Xanthine:
And I get to play with liquid nitrogen and some really cool toys. [Big Grin]

Are they cool before or after the liquid nitrogen? [Smile]
 
Posted by Scubbo (Member # 4832) on January 19, 2006, 13:21:
 
Hi Mander!

I'm also a newbie (although you seem to have thrown yourself into the boards far more quickly than I!), so in as far as I'm qualified to say it; welcome to the boards!
 
Posted by Moe Monkey (Member # 1900) on January 19, 2006, 16:06:
 
Hey Scubbo, nice avatar. We should form a club or something.

With respect to the whole open-concept thing, I think the original idea was to try to break down the metaphorical walls between subject areas (e.g. "What do you mean we have to use good grammar in our lab reports, this isn't English class!") and promote more cross-curricular thought. Unfortunately, someone took it all too literally and built the schools that way without actually changing the curriculum to suit the new digs -- teachers were still assigned discrete groups of students parcelled into particular classes for particular subjects. The only difference now was that if your English lesson was boring, you could always bend an ear to the Social Studies lesson that was being held next door. You can imagine how well it all works.

Our school has undergone several renovations, and the open concept floorplan is almost completely gone, except in the Science department, where we have a number of shared labs that still open into each other. And my classroom, of course.
 
Posted by Moe Monkey (Member # 1900) on January 19, 2006, 16:08:
 
Nice sig, Scubbo -- one of the lines I use with my Chem students is "Never anthropomorphize atoms, they hate when you do that!"
[Smile]
 
Posted by Mander (Member # 4816) on January 19, 2006, 16:34:
 
quote:
...promote more cross-curricular thought [...] you could always bend an ear to the Social Studies lesson that was being held next door. You can imagine how well it all works.
It sounds so nice, very Waldorfian (Waldorfish?), but not such a good adaptation. Trying to encourage free and spontaneous thinking while rigidly adhering to public school rules regulations... ugh.

I have to say that I am always extremely disappointed with curriculum alignment. There's a lot of lip service paid by admins, and when I try to make steps to do something with another teacher, I hear "It's not covered by the Regents/the proficiency exams, so I don't have time to teach it." There's so much that can be done with history, math, science, art, music, drama, in my content area but No Child shall be Left Behind (thank you President Shady Texas Superintendents Misrepresenting and Falsifying Information!)

quote:

Our school has undergone several renovations, and the open concept floorplan is almost completely gone, except in the Science department, where we have a number of shared labs that still open into each other. And my classroom, of course.

I can only imagine how chaotic (and smelly!) that must be at times.
 
Posted by Scubbo (Member # 4832) on January 20, 2006, 00:07:
 
Whoops, sorry about the avatar MoeMonkey.

quote:
Originally posted by Mander:

I have to say that I am always extremely disappointed with curriculum alignment. [...]There's so much that can be done with history, math, science, art, music, drama, in my content area

<<Puts up hand>> Me too...the only teachers I ever remember having any respect for, I never remember them actually "teaching" the subject per se. Every lesson would start vaguely anchored in something we were meant to be learning, and by the end we'd come away a little the wiser on the physics of telescopes, the make-up of a cow's stomach, the philosophy of apostrophes and what they'd had for lunch that day.

(And on a side note; does anyone else sense a song germinating in the rhyme "philsophy of apostrophes"? Any gifted filkers on the forum!?)
 
Posted by Rhonwyyn (Member # 2854) on January 20, 2006, 00:09:
 
Filk????!!!! I only know one other person who knows filk!!!

/me sings "There were five (five) constipated men in the Bible..."

(Okay, not really filk, but sung by a filker, IIRC.)
 
Posted by Callipygous (Member # 2071) on January 20, 2006, 01:55:
 
Not a word I have run across before
 
Posted by supaboy (Member # 183) on January 20, 2006, 06:40:
 
quote:
Originally posted by Rhonwyyn:
Filk????!!!! I only know one other person who knows filk!!!

You've been going to the wrong sorts of conventions, then. Seriously, there's been filking at every sci-fi convention I've been to.

I can't tell you how many rousing renditions of "Way-hey, Join The Starfleet" (to the tune of "The Drunken Sailor") I've managed to avoid over the years! [Smile]
 
Posted by Ugh, MightyClub (Member # 3112) on January 20, 2006, 08:59:
 
quote:
Originally posted by Mander:
There's so much that can be done with history, math, science, art, music, drama, in my content area but No Child shall be Left Behind (thank you President Shady Texas Superintendents Misrepresenting and Falsifying Information!)

The elder Clublet was very cranky when she came home from the first day of school this year with an assignment from her 6th grade math teacher to write an essay about why she likes math. ("But Dad, it's math class!") I thought it was great, and I told him so at our parent/teacher conference.

The 6th grade History and "English Language Arts" teachers in our school actually have a folding wall and frequently combine their classes. Their teaching plans are very intertwined. Also a "Good Thing" IMHO.
 
Posted by Scubbo (Member # 4832) on January 20, 2006, 11:33:
 
quote:
Originally posted by supaboy:

I can't tell you how many rousing renditions of "Way-hey, Join The Starfleet" (to the tune of "The Drunken Sailor") I've managed to avoid over the years! [Smile]

In my experience the one you can't get away from is "B***iality's best" to the tune of "Tie me kangaroo down"; once you've heard the new-and-improved version, the original lyrics take on a whole new meaning...although maybe that's more of a rugby song than a filk!
 
Posted by Moe Monkey (Member # 1900) on January 20, 2006, 13:28:
 
quote:
Originally posted by Scubbo:
Whoops, sorry about the avatar MoeMonkey.

Hey, no need to apologize or change your avatar -- there are supposedly thousands of people registered here, and definitely not that many avatars available (until you go for Superfandom, of course... I'm not there yet). The beard looks good, though. [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Scubbo (Member # 4832) on January 20, 2006, 13:37:
 
quote:
Originally posted by Moe Monkey:
The beard looks good, though. [Big Grin]

Thanks, although I was more attracted to the quizzically-raised eyebrow.
 
Posted by Mander (Member # 4816) on January 20, 2006, 13:41:
 
Thank you for mentioning filk... I had a great time reading the Wikipedia article and will get to the links....soonish.

Chuckling over a song that glorifies cats.... it's a good thing!
 
Posted by Rhonwyyn (Member # 2854) on January 20, 2006, 15:03:
 
Kathy Mar and Brobdingagian Bards are the two I listen to with any frequency. I don't know 'bout all the rest of 'em. (The Bards have free downloads on Amazon.)
 
Posted by Xanthine (Member # 736) on January 20, 2006, 23:05:
 
quote:
Originally posted by Mander:
Xanthine, well, are you having fun doing what you're doing in that netherworld between full employment status and unpaid wonk status? The toys are almost worth it, but I'm not sure you can eat crystalline structures (unless we're talking sugar, huh?)

I'm having fun so long as I don't look at my bank account... I do get a stipend. I get paid for a 20 hour week because grad students aren't supposed to work more than that (HUH???).

As far as eating crystalline structures goes, I really wouldn't want to eat my crystals. For one thing, they're microscopic. And for another, they grew in barium and arsenic. Not exactly nourishing. [Razz]

supa, the toys are cool in the metaphorical sense before the liquid nitrogen. After the liquid nitrogen (assuming liquid N2 and the toy are compatible) they're cool in every possible way. [Big Grin] What isn't cool, though, is a cryo-burn. Those really suck.
 
Posted by dragonman97 (Member # 780) on January 21, 2006, 11:32:
 
Flik, eh? I trust you're talking about something different than Flik International? =P

Sorry, I CBA to click more links now - I currently have over 10 tabs open in Fx now.
 
Posted by GMx (Member # 1523) on January 21, 2006, 11:39:
 
F-I-L-K dman. [Wink]
 
Posted by Rhonwyyn (Member # 2854) on January 21, 2006, 13:03:
 
From Filk 101 at www.filk.com :

quote:
WHY IT'S CALLED FILK?
The word filk was coined many years ago. There are many Legends about where the word comes from, however, its name can be traced to a gentleman by the name of Lee Jacobs. He was writing an article for SAPS (Spectator Amateur Press Society) back in the 1950's. The article was entitled "The Influence of Science Fiction on Modern American Filk Music". He had made a mistake and typo the "I" instead of the letter "O" in the word FOLK. The article was never published, for other reasons, however Lee Jacobs showed the article and told all his friends about it. Why the typo caught on is not clear but the term soon enter into Science Fiction Fan's vocabulary and has continued to stick to this day.


 


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