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Posted by linuxpyro (Member # 2530) on April 27, 2004, 13:39:
 
So what kinds of home network setups do you people have? What kinds of Internet connections? Do you run any servers?

I'll start. I have a cable modem that gets about 1.8 megabits/sec down, and 256k/sec up. I have a Linksys wireless router connected to the cable modem, and a wireless laptop running Windoze XP. Another desktop is also running Win XP, and is hardwired to the router. I have a Linux box (Cobalt Qube2) that is also hooked up to the Linksys, and works as a router between the main network and a subnet with just Linux boxes on it (I don't often use any of the Windoze machines; my family doesn't know Linux [yet].). One of the Linux boxes runs as a Web and Mail server, unbeknownst to my ISP. [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Drazgal (Member # 984) on April 28, 2004, 04:13:
 
5 pcs, running win98 SE or XP. ADSL 1mbit (damned cable companies not diggin up my road *shakes fist*) also running through a LinkSys router, well it will be if I can ever get the damned thing to work, so as it is we are running through a standard hub, luckily our modem has dual funcationality and can act as a mini router.
 
Posted by Tut-an-Geek (Member # 1234) on April 28, 2004, 07:09:
 
5 Cisco 2500 series routers, 3 24 port hubs, 1 catalyst 1900 with 12 ports, and one with 24, and two HP AdvanceStack 12 port switches.

Oh wait, that's just what I'm setting up now [Wink]
At home I just have a nice little configuration with a linksys NAT, 24 port unmanaged 100T switch, and a few 802.11[g|b] access points
 
Posted by MacManKrisK (Member # 955) on April 28, 2004, 08:33:
 
My network is the epidimy of "slow and old technology."

I've got a 33.6Kbps Microcom DeskPorte S dial-up modem connected to my fileserver/NAT box (PowerMac 8500/120). Actual internet connection speed is a lowly 26.4Kbps, thanks in large part to my phone company's total suckyness.

The NAT box is connected via Cat5 UTP to my no-name 17-port 10Mbps hub which connects a good portion of the rest of my workstations; the most powerful of which, and the only noteworthy is the 1GHz eMac.

In parallel with my Ethernet network, and bridged together by the same NAT box, is an old-skool 256Kbps LocalTalk (PhoneNet, ModuNet, whatever) network which attaches to my LaserWriter 320, PowerBook 160, and other various ancient Macs.

Both network segments run IP and AppleTalk and can access the (very slow) Internet. LocalTalk is running AppleTalk-encapsulated IP.
 
Posted by littlefish (Member # 966) on April 28, 2004, 08:43:
 
Motorola surfboard cable modem, connected to a 4-port 10/100 router. This is connected in the same room to an airport extreme wireless router, and the shared printer. 2 other cables go into two other rooms. In my room there is a 4 port 10/100 hub, so I can use my mac, my sgi and my linux box. In the other room, it just terminates. All set up for DHCP and the airport is WEP'd.
 
Posted by Jace Raven (Member # 2444) on April 28, 2004, 16:03:
 
a series of cans and nylon string attaching one to every room in the house make for very "rewliable"
"data" communication between clients and workstations.
 
Posted by Spiderman (Member # 1609) on April 29, 2004, 07:12:
 
Okay, Here goes...

Router/firewall: Pentium Pro box running linux...

1: 8 port netgear switch
1: 4 port netgear switch/wireless access point
1: old 4 port router acting as a switch
1: 5 port Linksys hub for stragglers...

1: Debian box running apache/mysql/etc etc (athlon xp @ 1.4 ghz)
1: Debian game/workstation (athlon xp @ 1.67 ghz)
5: Misc boxes running Win2K
1: HP Pavilion ZExxxx running Debian (athlon xp m @ 1.87 ghz)
1: Powerbook G4 @ 1.25 ghz running Panther

and one of these days, I'm putting in one of the many old boxes from the attic as a passthrough bridge (using Debian of course [Smile] ) to experiment with some of the new netfilter code which allows transparent traffic control via iptables...
 
Posted by quantumfluff (Member # 450) on April 29, 2004, 13:02:
 
cracks fingers...

768Kbs DSL line with 4 static IPs
- 4 port hub for untrusted external net
- pentium pro external web server
- ancient gateway 486 (freebsd) configured as
a firewall/NAT box. it answers 2 of the IPs.
One goes to the internal network, the
other goes to an untrusted test netowrk
- a pingtel IP phone on the final IP address

A 1Mbs cablemodem
- netgear firewall/NAT box to internal net

SMC 16 port switch
LinkSys 802.11g access point

pentium II for DNS, Web and Mail
pentium III with gobs of disk for file server
athon with 2 heads for desktop
pentium II windows NT box shares one head
iBook G4
iMac G4
pentium III (windows 98)
eMachines eOne (windows 98)
3com Audrey

Then there are the machines I only turn on for special projects.
-SGI indy
-Sun Sparcstation IPC
-Sun Sparcstation 1+
-IBM thinkpad (really old)

I would also like to point out that my electric bill is $280/month
 
Posted by dragonman97 (Member # 780) on April 29, 2004, 13:22:
 
Okay, I think my response to that is simply ....*drool*....

Very nice, qf. There are probably one or two other little things I left out, like network gear and what-not, but obviously it doesn't compare [Razz] .
 
Posted by Erbo (Member # 199) on April 29, 2004, 15:43:
 
Internet connection: Ricochet wireless Internet (operating somewhere in the cellphone frequency range, 800-900 MHz or so). Bandwidth is anywhere from 128-400 Kbps.

Central server (hostname "delenn"): Pentium 2/233 with 192 Mb RAM and about 8G of disk, runs Debian GNU/Linux. Runs the Ricochet connection (which acts somewhat like a dialup modem, so it uses pppd and diald) and acts as a router; also runs NFS and Samba sharing so we can keep MP3 files there, as well as a mail server and an "intranet" Web server. (A service called "dnsmasq" handles internal DNS, DNS caching, and DHCP.)

Network hub: SMC broadband router (I picked it up at a discount; I don't use the broadband port on it right now) with a 4-port 100Mbps hub and built-in 802.11b wireless. (I use 128-bit WEP, naturally.)

My workstation (hostname "cerebro"): Athlon/800 with an 80G disk and 512M RAM. Dual boots Debian GNU/Linux (preferred) and Win98SE (games).

My wife's workstation (hostname "kayleigh"): Actually a Toshiba Satellite notebook, with P4/2.5GHz, 512M RAM and 40G disk, running Windows XP. Normally hard-wired into the network, but she has an 802.11b card for it.

My work notebook (hostname "moira"): A HP Pavilion notebook, with a P4 Mobile/1.4GHz, 768M RAM, 30G disk, running Red Hat 9. Can be hard-wired into the network, and I also have an 802.11b card for it.

We have a couple of dead, partly-cannibalized machines lying around, too...

Our internal IP addresses are in the 10.29.99.0/24 block. This is because we were married on October 29, 1999. (I have some aliases to other internal netblocks running, too, for convenience.)
 
Posted by quantumfluff (Member # 450) on April 29, 2004, 16:27:
 
quote:
Originally posted by Erbo:
Our internal IP addresses are in the 10.29.99.0/24 block. This is because we were married on October 29, 1999

That's too cute for words.

Dman: Yes, it seems a rather elaborate home network, but I do work from home and produce software for a living, so it's not entirely inappropriate.
 
Posted by dragonman97 (Member # 780) on April 29, 2004, 17:37:
 
quote:
Originally posted by quantumfluff:

Dman: Yes, it seems a rather elaborate home network, but I do work from home and produce software for a living, so it's not entirely inappropriate.

qf: Yeah, I was pretty certain of that fact [Smile] . I'm hoping to take some kit home in the next few weeks to test out some design ideas...if my boss approves a plan of mine - and assuming I take the job.
 
Posted by Alan! (Member # 1261) on April 30, 2004, 00:13:
 
quote:
Originally posted by Jace Raven:
a series of cans and nylon string attaching one to every room in the house make for very "rewliable"
"data" communication between clients and workstations.

Luxury! We just scream from room to room, with physical violence redundancy.
 
Posted by Erbo (Member # 199) on April 30, 2004, 09:25:
 
quote:
Originally posted by quantumfluff:
That's too cute for words.

Well, it wasn't until some time after we were married that I set up the LAN. I asked Pamela if she had any preference as to the internal network numbering, and I explained to her about the three private-use IP address blocks, the 10.0.0.0/8 block among them. She suggested 10.29.99.0/24, and I said, "Good enough for me."
 
Posted by Shinaku (Member # 2027) on May 04, 2004, 13:18:
 
TBH, mines a bit shocking:-

K6-2/550 server (for internet sharing) running SuSE 9 pro

Athlon 1100 - win2k, mandrake 9.2
(my box)

PIII 500 - win2k (sisters box)

p133 panasonic cf-25 toughbook - win98se (my craptop!)

Apple Power Macintosh 7200/90 - OS 9.1

3Com 10/100 ethernet hub

Internet - Wanadoo dialup v.90, lucky to connect at above 44kps

although the powermac isn't networked, mostly for the reason that I can't be arsed to dig it out from under a pile of clothes and computer bits.
 
Posted by maven (Member # 2714) on May 18, 2004, 10:55:
 
1 4-port router/firewall
1 cable modem
1 16-port 10/100 switch
1 8-port 1000 switch
cat-5 cabling
1 linux box (SuSE) pretending to be a server
1 dual-boot Mandrake/win2k/win2k server
1 XP box
5 machines with linux running on it (slackware, slackware, debian, gentoo, fedora)
1 POS laptop with Windows ME whick will be replaced by OIC Group beta Linux once i swap the memory.
 
Posted by Jace Raven (Member # 2444) on May 18, 2004, 13:57:
 
The other day I was getting a lot of latency on a 30' "patch cable" from one "client" to the other. I cannot understand it but it was really bothering me so I traced the line and ended up finding a rat was chewing through one of my strings.
 
Posted by Tut-an-Geek (Member # 1234) on May 18, 2004, 17:27:
 
quote:
Originally posted by Jace Raven:
The other day I was getting a lot of latency on a 30' "patch cable" from one "client" to the other. I cannot understand it but it was really bothering me so I traced the line and ended up finding a rat was chewing through one of my strings.

What ever happened to standards? In my day, patch cords in the work area could be no longer than 3 meters. Not only that, but we used copper instead of string!

Fancy that!
[Smile]
 
Posted by dragonman97 (Member # 780) on May 18, 2004, 19:05:
 
Ooops, I don't suppose I should have a bunch of 40' cables in one room, then, along with a number of 25s [Wink] . Gee, and they work, too...
 
Posted by Jace Raven (Member # 2444) on May 18, 2004, 22:22:
 
I do believe that a cat5 will do well at upto and about 100 meters.
 
Posted by fishd (Member # 2416) on May 19, 2004, 01:32:
 
Been through a bit of a redesign recently after the shocker that my sticks-ville home could get xDSL!

1 Linksys WAG-54G Wireless ADSL router + 4 port switch
1 3-port HP JetDirect box with HPLj 5L & Epson Colour Inkjet
1 Shuttle SB61G XPC running Mandrake 10CE O/S running DHCPd, SMB, Apache, & Neverwinter Nights [Big Grin]
1 Shuttle SK41G running WindowsXP and via Virtual PC2004 2 x Windows 2003 Server, Windows 2000 Server, Windows NT4 Server & Redhat 9.
1 Shuttle SV25 - currently un-used
1 home-brew AlthonXP mid-tower - currently un-used
1 Cobalt Cube2 occasionally running NetBSD but too slow to run Gallery [cry baby]
1 Dell Latitude D600 running XP using 802.11b (for work)
1 Compaq Armada M700 running XP & 802.11b(for the GF)
1 Toshiba Portege 3480CT running XP and 802.11b (for general browsing)
1 Toshiba Libretto 100CT running Redhat 9 & Win98SE (for the car)

Then downstairs:
1 802.11b Wireless Bridge
1 D-Link 4-port "hubby"
1 Tivo with Turbonet, TivoWeb & 120Gb HDD
1 Xbox with xbox-live

Wireless rules, I spent Sunday evening sat in the garden with pals drinking beer, having a bbq and wirelessly streaming my mp3's to the laptop!

My pal should sign up here, he's got a network that makes CCIE's green with envy! He run's seperate network segments with 802.11b, Fast ethernet, ethernet, 16-mbit token-ring, 4-mbit token ring, OC-3 ATM & serial with a mix of Cisco and 3Com equipment. Internet access is provided via ADSL and Cable modem. And he has dial-in using ISDN with SecureID via Radius servers.
He's got more machines than I can remember but the OS's are primarily Windows server, Linux, MacOS and a few SunSparcs. I think he managed to get hold of a small-ish AS400 from somewhere too... [Eek!]

p.s. Thanks to the Microsoft Partner Programme all my MS software is licensed too! [Wink]
 
Posted by fishd (Member # 2416) on May 19, 2004, 01:51:
 
quote:
Originally posted by Tut-an-Geek:
What ever happened to standards? In my day, patch cords in the work area could be no longer than 3 meters.

Possibly more to do with Health & Safety than standards, the firm I'm working with at the moment has a site rule that no cable be longer than two meters, they were really bummed when they bought 600 Compaq Evo's and found they all arrived with 3 meter patch cables!

quote:
I do believe that a cat5 will do well at upto and about 100 meters.
Definately yes for 10 & 100mb and according to this site you can even run gigabit up to 100meters although I think it needs Cat5E but there you go.

I used to meet regularly with 3Com engineers in technology briefings for a firm I worked for, one of their guys was helping out with the design of their then-new gigabit enterprise products; when discussing the potential RF emissions from gigabit he said "you can run gigabit over copper, but I'd prefer over fibre... at least till I'd fathered enough children anyways" [Eek!]
 
Posted by Tut-an-Geek (Member # 1234) on May 19, 2004, 03:42:
 
It's not health and safety. It's the TIA/EIA (Don't remebere which, may be both) standards for cable lengths.
Maximum total distance = 100meters
Mimumum total = 2.5 meters
Max horizontal = 90 meters
Max Worspace patch = 3 meters
Max Cross-connects = 6 meters
 
Posted by Sinn (Member # 2111) on May 19, 2004, 06:04:
 
Mine is pretty simple. 3000/368 Cable modem to Netgear Gigabit router... Router to switch panel in wall. Then each of my 3 computers (one for mom, one for my sister, and the big one for me) has a 10/100/1000 NIC.

PC 1 - Mom's
AMD K6-2 500 Mhz
384 MB Ram

PC 2 - Sister's
Athlon XP 2100
512Mb RAM

PC 3 - Mine
P4 3.0gHz
1 Gig Kingston HyperX PC4000
2 WD Raptors (striped)
2 WD 250GB SATA drives (for storage)
Radeon 9700 Pro
Etc. etc.
 
Posted by Tut-an-Geek (Member # 1234) on May 19, 2004, 12:40:
 
quote:
Originally posted by Sinn:
3000/368 Cable modem

Oh yeah, forgot to mention

I've got a 10,000/1000 cable modem [Wink]
 
Posted by GMx (Member # 1523) on May 19, 2004, 13:52:
 
quote:
Originally posted by Tut-an-Geek:
Oh yeah, forgot to mention

I've got a 10,000/1000 cable modem [Wink]

What don't you have? [Razz] [Wink]
 
Posted by Cap'n Vic (Member # 1477) on May 19, 2004, 14:00:
 
A propane leak?
 
Posted by Spiderman (Member # 1609) on May 19, 2004, 15:53:
 
quote:
Originally posted by Tut-an-Geek:
quote:
Originally posted by Sinn:
3000/368 Cable modem

Oh yeah, forgot to mention

I've got a 10,000/1000 cable modem [Wink]

Oh, but Iiiiiv'e got a 10,000/10,000 microwave feed [Razz]
Just had to throw that in there [Wink]
BTW, I'm not kidding [Big Grin]

Disclaimer: The contents of this post though accurate may display irregular behaviour on the part of it's poster due to high caffeine and sugar levels. (I really should try to get some proper sleep one of these nights...)
 
Posted by quantumfluff (Member # 450) on May 19, 2004, 20:37:
 
quote:
Originally posted by Spiderman:
Oh, but Iiiiiv'e got a 10,000/10,000 microwave feed [Razz]

But I've got root on your border router [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Spiderman (Member # 1609) on May 19, 2004, 21:04:
 
quote:
Originally posted by quantumfluff:
quote:
Originally posted by Spiderman:
Oh, but Iiiiiv'e got a 10,000/10,000 microwave feed [Razz]

But I've got root on your border router [Big Grin]
Oh, but I've got that too [Razz]

Ah, the joys of subscribing to the ISP one works for... [Smile]
 
Posted by The_Psychogenius (Member # 2366) on June 13, 2004, 04:37:
 
My network is a constant work in progress

I have most of my machines (386 and higher) running through a Belkin AT monitor/keyboard/mouse switcher. Hooked up to that is the following.....

-GEM/HP Celeron 500 in an old AT desktop case with custom paintwork, running Windows 98 SE, my #1 Comp, usually used for games and recording my own music

-Pentium Pro Tower, named Godzilla, the thing is nearly 4 feet tall. Runs Windows 98 SE, I intent to host my vintage computer site on it after I move out and gain some independance

-ZEOS 486 in a Flight 386 Case, running a DX4 and Windows For Workgroups 3.11 over DOS 6.22, my classic DOS games box

-Compaq Deskpro 386 2570 running DOS 6.00 and Windows 3.0, it's linked up but not networked fully yet (work in progress)

-My IBM PC-330 100DX4, my trusty little 486 that runs darn near anything put on it for some reason. This sucker runs stuff made to run on late model Pentiums in certain cases.

-and my Linux box, running Slackware, and pieced together out of everything from Electric Gutiar parts, some old AT PC's, a DEC 486, and an IBM PS/2 Valuepoint, basically, the mutt of the bunch

Outside of the switcher I have the following....

Micro Configurations Corp XT, With an IBM 5153 CGA Monitor and an MFM Hard Disk running on an RLL controller......

IBM PS/2 286 Model 30, my 286 system of course, complete with all the IBM perhipherals...

And my 5 laptops (286, 486, 486 and another 486). Only 2 have PCMCIA slots and thus can be networked without hardware hacking or trickery.

All computers run into a 5 port Linksys hub via Catagory 5 Ethernet cables, the first 4 I used were bought from Wal-Mart but I recently learned how to make my own cables. Anything with a PCI bus runs a 10/100 Base TX ethernet adapter, the rest use old surplus 10 mbps Lan Cards of various chipsets, brands, and bus widths.

ALL of my computers (yes, the XT and the 286 too) have internet access either via Proxy on the GEM or Godzilla, or go through my Serial port switcher to my v.92 56K Modem (heh, it's enough for me).

As far as owning this many computers, I'm still looking to find some Keyboard cables for my switcher so I can downsize to using my main brand new 17" KDS monitor and my old trusty 102 Key AT Enhanced keyboard (with an XT layout oddly enough), and my optical trackball. It's also a pain to wire this thing up after moving it, but when it's working, it's shockingly great. The 386's and higher do internet very well, but the 286's and XT of course, are a little on the slow side of things.
 
Posted by GameMaster (Member # 1173) on June 13, 2004, 20:20:
 
Home: small network from 2 to 4 computers running various versions of various operating systems. Usually it's just one Linux box and a WinDOZE98 machine. The linux box is currently running a apache server for development purposes, and an SQL server, same reason. Typically it has an SSH server or telnet server (depending on the OS de jour).

WORK: 22 3GHz Intel computers running RH Enterprise WS with two gigabit switches. Messner node (the main node) has a outside link to the world, only ssh is allowed through the hardware firewall and IPTables is blocking all but known computers from connecting. Internally, passwordless RSH is turned on for MPI to work it's magic. Additionally, there is a KVM switch wich allows the single keyboard, monitor, mouse to connect to each machine.
 


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