This is topic Student Recites 8,784 Digits of Pi in forum Math-a-holics and Code Junkies at The Geek Culture Forums!.


To visit this topic, use this URL:
http://www.geekculture.com/cgi-bin/ultimatebb/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic;f=17;t=000178

Posted by Snaggy (Member # 123) on March 16, 2006, 10:56:
 
A high school student Tuesday recited 8,784 digits of Pi — the non-repeating and non-terminating decimal — likely placing him among the top Pi-reciters in the world.

He was hoping to get 10,790 digits.

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20060316/ap_on_sc/pi_prodigy

I'm lucky if I can remember 4 digits. [Razz]
 
Posted by maximile (Member # 3446) on March 16, 2006, 11:24:
 
I found the last digit of pi the other day. It's not as long as everyone thinks.

(For those of you who are interested, the last digit is a 9).
 
Posted by merr (Member # 2193) on March 16, 2006, 11:27:
 
That beats the crap out of my friend who thought he was pretty BA because he could recite 40 digits of pi.

I am so emailing him that link right now... [Razz]
 
Posted by The Famous Druid (Member # 1769) on March 16, 2006, 11:32:
 
quote:
Originally posted by Snaggy:
A high school student Tuesday recited 8,784 digits of Pi ...

He was hoping to get 10,790 digits.

.. so his teacher gave him 8/10 for the assignment.

/veal
 
Posted by drunkennewfiemidget (Member # 2814) on March 16, 2006, 13:28:
 
*counts*

I can remember 10 digits of pi. :S
 
Posted by Flashfire (Member # 2616) on March 16, 2006, 14:38:
 
Meh. I'm lucky if I can remember where the Pi key is on my scientific calculator...

and I'm doing even better if I can remember where I put said scientific calculator... [Big Grin]
 
Posted by TheMoMan (Member # 1659) on March 16, 2006, 15:18:
 
Snaggy____________Years ago when I was a math pup there was a book of math tables and standards I believe it was published by the Chemical Rubber company, In their disclaimer at the front they had Pi to one hundred and ten places quite good for 1962, however the next line was the best, these tables are proofed against many sources and notice of any errors will be appreciated.
 
Posted by Metasquares (Member # 4441) on March 16, 2006, 17:02:
 
Sometimes I wonder if this is what the general public thinks that mathematicians do. While impressive, this is not a "mathematical accomplishment", as the article states.
 
Posted by TheMoMan (Member # 1659) on March 17, 2006, 10:38:
 
Metasquares________________I wonder how many people know that Pi is the area of the incribed circle of unit one radius, as compared to the area of the two unit square. Who needs that level of accuracy, they hit the moon with 3 digits and mid course corrections.
 
Posted by stringlion (Member # 4767) on March 17, 2006, 13:26:
 
I can Remember 3.

3.14

What do i get for that?
 
Posted by Serenak (Member # 2950) on March 17, 2006, 15:39:
 
3.1459 IIRC
[Big Grin]
 
Posted by dragonman97 (Member # 780) on March 17, 2006, 15:46:
 
quote:
Originally posted by Serenak:
3.1459 IIRC
[Big Grin]

Um...that's 3.14_1_59

and I'd go at least to 3.1415926 [Wink]
 
Posted by MacManKrisK (Member # 955) on March 17, 2006, 19:14:
 
(/me sings)

Jenny what is that number?
You've gotta' keep it in mind.
Jenny write down this number:
three point one four one five nine
(three point one four one five nine)


(/me bows)

Thank you, thank you very much.
 
Posted by magefile (Member # 2918) on March 17, 2006, 20:31:
 
3.1415926535897 ... dang, I can never remember the next one. I think it's either 4, or it rounds to 4, though.

I'm told the "thing to do" for incoming freshmen at Caltech is to memorize as many digits of pi as possible in an attempt to impress the current students. They're *weird* over their, eh? [Razz]
 
Posted by Rhonwyyn (Member # 2854) on March 17, 2006, 21:23:
 
Learn Pi set to music, courtesy of #JoyofTech: http://keithschofield.com/pi/std.html
 
Posted by Democritus the Minor (Member # 2620) on March 28, 2006, 14:05:
 
extended digits of pi are useless from an engineering standpoint. pi out to 40 digits describes the ratio of a circle of radius 13.7 billion ly (the universe-circle) accurate to an hydrogen atomic diameter. (ish)
 
Posted by Tiroth (Member # 8543) on May 23, 2007, 14:53:
 
I can only remember 3.14159265358979323846
 
Posted by iWanToUseaMac (Member # 4993) on May 23, 2007, 18:31:
 
[ohwell] I think that although for a human being is pretty hard to remember that length of digits, I'd leave this job to a computer... but this is
still quite amusing after all.

PS: I didn't knew there was a difference in pronunciation between π and pie. [Razz]

PPS: As far as my calculator knows, I know...
3.141592654
 
Posted by Stereo (Member # 748) on May 24, 2007, 08:58:
 
quote:
Originally posted by Democritus the Minor:
extended digits of pi are useless from an engineering standpoint. pi out to 40 digits describes the ratio of a circle of radius 13.7 billion ly (the universe-circle) accurate to an hydrogen atomic diameter. (ish)

THANK YOU! [thumbsup] [Big Grin]

Yes I have to scream it. I find this whole "let's find as many digits of Pi we can" stuff stupid. I heard they finds digits with some kind of algorithm, but what if the algorithm is flawed comparatively to the definition of Pi? To me, Pi is the ratio between the circumference of a circle and its radius. So has someone drawn/taken a perfect circle, measured its circumference an radius, taken into consideration the uncertainty of the measuring tool, did the division, and confirmed every new digit found? (Or am I just ignorant of the certainity level of the algorithm used?)
 
Posted by spungo (Member # 1089) on May 24, 2007, 10:07:
 
quote:
Originally posted by Snaggy:
A high school student Tuesday recited 8,784 digits of Pi ...

...and inkeeping with this admirable quality of entertainment, tonight I shall give a dramatic reading of the local telephone book. All welcome. [Smile]
 
Posted by The Famous Druid (Member # 1769) on May 24, 2007, 13:14:
 
quote:
Originally posted by Democritus the Minor:
extended digits of pi are useless from an engineering standpoint. pi out to 40 digits describes the ratio of a circle of radius 13.7 billion ly (the universe-circle) accurate to an hydrogen atomic diameter. (ish)

Back when I was in school, my book of mathematical tables (now that's showing my age, have todays school kids even seen a book of maths tables?) had 2 pages of 'random digits', which began
14 15 92 65 35.....

Look familiar?

Digits of pi are a high-quality source of 'random' numbers.

quote:
Originally posted by Stereo:
I heard they finds digits with some kind of algorithm, but what if the algorithm is flawed comparatively to the definition of Pi? To me, Pi is the ratio between the circumference of a circle and its radius. So has someone drawn/taken a perfect circle, measured its circumference an radius, taken into consideration the uncertainty of the measuring tool, did the division, and confirmed every new digit found? (Or am I just ignorant of the certainity level of the algorithm used?)

Pi is the integral of the curve x^2 + y^2 = 1

It was actually one of the first integrals ever calculated, Archimedes used 2 96-sided polygons to calculate 223/71 < pi < 22/7, long before the 'invention' of calculus.
 
Posted by dragonman97 (Member # 780) on May 24, 2007, 13:36:
 
Funny how a few of the posts looked familiar....

Then, I saw one post and thought "Hmm...that's awfully pedantic - who wrote that?"
(But not nearly as pedantic as some awesome posts there. [Smile] )
I looked up and to the left and realized "Oh, that was me!" [Razz] Finally, I spotted the dates on the posts...
 
Posted by Stereo (Member # 748) on May 24, 2007, 16:19:
 
quote:
Originally posted by The Famous Druid:
Pi is the integral of the curve x^2 + y^2 = 1

I worry a super [blush] is in order... [blush] [blush] [blush] (I should have known that. How could I forget?)
 
Posted by garlicguy (Member # 3166) on May 24, 2007, 16:22:
 
I know the distance from New York City to the Sea of Tranquility on the Moon to the nearest 1/10,000th of an inch.

It is exact, precise and irrefutable.

But then, who wants that information?

What is the purpose of human life?

Is anyone out there?
 
Posted by Colonel Panic (Member # 1200) on May 25, 2007, 05:51:
 
That's nothing.

I can recite the location of every pothole in on the stretch of I-80 that goes through Nebraska.

Colonel Panic
 
Posted by Reedius (Member # 7130) on May 28, 2007, 15:19:
 
How the hell can someone remember eight thousand digits of pi? is there a formula or a method to do it?
 
Posted by Tiroth (Member # 8543) on May 28, 2007, 16:04:
 
Well, I'm guessing they spend years saying it over in their head continuously. They must also have an extraordinary IQ.

-Tiroth
 
Posted by garlicguy (Member # 3166) on May 28, 2007, 17:57:
 
quote:
Originally posted by Tiroth:
Well, I'm guessing they spend years saying it over in their head continuously.

-Tiroth

They have voices in their heads that are trained to do that 24/7. It's called "s-c-h-i-z-o-p-h-r-e-n-i-a" and it works like a charm.
 
Posted by spungo (Member # 1089) on May 28, 2007, 18:26:
 
quote:
Originally posted by garlicguy:
quote:
Originally posted by Tiroth:
Well, I'm guessing they spend years saying it over in their head continuously.

-Tiroth

They have voices in their heads that are trained to do that 24/7. It's called "s-c-h-i-z-o-p-h-r-e-n-i-a" and it works like a charm.
Funny, I don't hear numbers... unless you translate "Kill the bitch! Kill the bitch!" into hex.
 
Posted by iWanToUseaMac (Member # 4993) on May 28, 2007, 21:14:
 
quote:
Originally posted by Reedius:
How the hell can someone remember eight thousand digits of pi? is there a formula or a method to do it?

Just do it as a computer: if you want to put a large file and you don't have space, the easiest way is to just delete the unused files and junk in order to make room for it.
A smart way is to compress the file.
An smarter way is to create a program capable to create such file.
In the former, memory works, so it's not hard.
I both latter you need to use synapses, were intelligence plays an important role.
 
Posted by boo (Member # 5991) on June 01, 2007, 12:22:
 
Daniel Tammet's way of doing it is far more impressive. [Smile]
 
Posted by Rhonwyyn (Member # 2854) on June 01, 2007, 14:08:
 
quote:
Originally posted by boo:
Daniel Tammet's way of doing it is far more impressive. [Smile]

You've done it with Daniel Tammet?
 
Posted by Neil (Member # 8881) on June 19, 2007, 17:10:
 
quote:
Originally posted by Tiroth:
Well, I'm guessing they spend years saying it over in their head continuously. They must also have an extraordinary IQ.

-Tiroth

Why? It doesn't take a genuis to remember something, if they try hard enough. Scientists say that most people have about the same inherent memory ability, just some use better methods than others. The good news is anyone can learn the most efficient methods.
 


© 2018 Geek Culture

Powered by Infopop Corporation
UBB.classicTM 6.4.0