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Author Topic: Very good idea
Zwilnik

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Icon 1 posted November 22, 2005 12:40      Profile for Zwilnik   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Just saw this on "The Dragons Den" on the TV (it's a TV show where people try and get investment money for their business ideas).

http://www.interflush.co.uk/

Essentially it looks like it's a great way to avoid wasting water and save money.

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Posts: 1040 | From: West Sussex, UK | Registered: Dec 2000  |  IP: Logged
Matias
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Icon 1 posted November 22, 2005 14:55      Profile for Matias   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Very good idea.

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quantumfluff
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Icon 1 posted November 22, 2005 18:26      Profile for quantumfluff     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
But the problem is not that simple. It may be down the toilet, but sometimes you need more water to help get things down the horizontal run of pipe to the waste stack.
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Zwilnik

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Icon 1 posted November 23, 2005 03:40      Profile for Zwilnik   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by quantumfluff:
But the problem is not that simple. It may be down the toilet, but sometimes you need more water to help get things down the horizontal run of pipe to the waste stack.

Is that a US plumbing thing ? In the UK, once it's gone past the U-bend it's history [Smile]

Besides, once it's out of sight, it's the next person's flushing problem [Smile]

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The Universe is entirely made up of elements.
The most important of which is the element of surprise.

Posts: 1040 | From: West Sussex, UK | Registered: Dec 2000  |  IP: Logged
quantumfluff
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Icon 1 posted November 23, 2005 06:14      Profile for quantumfluff     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
US plumbing varies with region, but in the north it generally features a central plumbing stack to avoid running pipes against exterior walls. If the stack is on the sink side of a bathroom, there is a horizontal run from the toilet over to the waste downfeed. In my house, I have a 12' run from my commode to the stack.

That's not so much of a problem with new pipes, but many houses still have cast iron waste pipes (which are much quieter than plastic) that have very rough sides. They were fine with the toilets of the day, but low-flush toilets simply don't provide enough liquid to slosh the poop and paper down a long rough pipe.

I have limited familiarity with UK plumbing. I have seen macerators (spelling?) and realize they would alleviate the flushage problem through "blenderization". I also have noticed a lot of exterior waste stacks. That simply isn't going to fly in the much of North America. We'ld get gradual build up of frost on the insides until they clog. It's not a pretty thought about what happens next.

This article has a strangly fascinating discussion about the mismatch of plumbing fixtures and plumbing infrastructure. It used to be free, but when I looked, they wanted to charge $3 for it. It might be worth the entertainment value just to learn about some of the testing methodologies toilet manufactures use [Big Grin]

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supaboy
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Icon 1 posted November 23, 2005 17:48      Profile for supaboy     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I seem to recall when I visited Australia, the toilets had two-stage flushing mechanisms, with a normal flush with one button and a turbo-powered flush with another button.

I didn't find any references so I chose buttons based on whether it was an int or a float as the best strategy to both conserve resources and avoid buffer underflows.

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The Famous Druid

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Icon 1 posted November 23, 2005 18:58      Profile for The Famous Druid     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by supaboy:
I seem to recall when I visited Australia, the toilets had two-stage flushing mechanisms, with a normal flush with one button and a turbo-powered flush with another button.

Understandable mistake, but quite wrong.

The 2-button toilets have a 'normal' flush for aussies, and high-powered reverse-coriolis flush that forces the water to swirl around the other way, for the benefit of visiting northies who might otherwise suffer attacks of vertigo.

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quantumfluff
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Icon 1 posted November 23, 2005 20:35      Profile for quantumfluff     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
My god man, isn't that dangerous. I thought injecting water into the bowl in an anti-coriolis mannor would result in a giant splash upwards. That would make the curtessy (sp) flush impossible. Unless you like that sort of thing. [Wink]
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dragonman97

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Icon 1 posted November 23, 2005 21:28      Profile for dragonman97   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
And this, ladies and gentlemen, is why I read GC. [Wink] [Big Grin]

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There are three things you can be sure of in life: Death, taxes, and reading about fake illnesses online...

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supaboy
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Icon 1 posted November 24, 2005 08:17      Profile for supaboy     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by The Famous Druid:
Understandable mistake, but quite wrong.

How considerate of you! However, you could have avoided the design of an anti-coriolis flushing system by simply installing a standard-flush potty on the ceiling. Voila! The water rotates in the expected direction!
Posts: 1767 | From: Columbia, SC USA | Registered: Jan 2000  |  IP: Logged


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