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Author Topic: Audio Geek Needed
apilar
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Icon 1 posted November 28, 2004 15:21      Profile for apilar         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I'm a total newbie to digital audio. Lotsa questions.

Equip:
- PowerBook 512 MB, 1 GHz PowerPC G4, Mac OSX 10.2.3
- Pro Tools/MBOX
- SONY MD-R70

Status:
Have to upgrade to OS X Panther before I can install Pro Tools. Awaiting shipment.

QUESTIONS:
1. How do I get audio from Mini Disc to PowerBook?

a. Do I have to wait until Pro Tools is installed or can I use something that comes with my PowerBook like iTunes or iMovie?

b. What cable do I need/use and where do I plug it in?

c. Can I load audio into PowerBook directly from MD player or must I go through MBox?

Can someone walk me through the setup to transfer audio from my MD to my PB based on the hardware/software I have or am getting?

BTW, I'm trying to put together radio segments ala NPR and I know I almost have everything that I need but can't visualize my next steps.

Posts: 2 | From: wyoming | Registered: Nov 2004  |  IP: Logged
Rhonwyyn

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Icon 1 posted November 28, 2004 19:56      Profile for Rhonwyyn   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Hi Apilar.

I can't help you with this question, but I did want to welcome you to GC! This is a great place to talk about technical stuff and life stuff (sometimes more life than techie stuff, but that's okay!). A bunch of the guys will be around later to welcome you too.

It's great to have you here! (The writer/producer thing really intrigues me. Right now I'm a proofreader for Clipper Magazine.)

*Welcome!*

Posts: 3851 | From: Lancaster, PA | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged
Alan!
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Icon 1 posted November 28, 2004 20:15      Profile for Alan!     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by apilar:
I'm a total newbie to digital audio. Lotsa questions.

Equip:
- PowerBook 512 MB, 1 GHz PowerPC G4, Mac OSX 10.2.3
- Pro Tools/MBOX
- SONY MD-R70

Status:
Have to upgrade to OS X Panther before I can install Pro Tools. Awaiting shipment.

QUESTIONS:
1. How do I get audio from Mini Disc to PowerBook?

a. Do I have to wait until Pro Tools is installed or can I use something that comes with my PowerBook like iTunes or iMovie?

b. What cable do I need/use and where do I plug it in?

c. Can I load audio into PowerBook directly from MD player or must I go through MBox?

Can someone walk me through the setup to transfer audio from my MD to my PB based on the hardware/software I have or am getting?

BTW, I'm trying to put together radio segments ala NPR and I know I almost have everything that I need but can't visualize my next steps.

n00b. i mean, welcome, but i have to wonder why you have chosen to purchase these things without any prior knowledge of what they do!

powerbook has:
16-bit
line-in
headphone-out (not line-out, different impedance/milli-wattage)

m-box has (much the same as the alleged apple asteroid rumoured to be announced soon):
24-bit
2 x xlr-in (mic)
line-out

so to get MD into powerbook, you want;
A. a little sterojack-stereojack, plug it straight into the powerbook line-in
B. a little stereojack-xlr/jack, plug it into mbox, plug usb from mbox into powerbook.

i'd go with A as MD's are usually 16-bit (unless you have the new ones on ATRAC 24-bit).

download a really nice program released by TC electronics, but then pulled later because it was a little 'too good', and they wanted to charge for it: Spark ME, or use Pro Tools if you have a month or so of training in it.

If using Spark, System preferences > Sound > Input > Line In.
Make a new file in Spark, record, done.

--------------------
Alan!

Two rabbis, a priest, and an awkward silence after there's no intelligible punch line to this joke, walk into a bar.

Posts: 219 | From: Perth, Western Australia | Registered: Apr 2002  |  IP: Logged
Callipygous
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Icon 1 posted November 29, 2004 08:16      Profile for Callipygous     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Unfortunately Alans app Spark needs a serial no, which if the story he tells is true, I doubt that the authors would be willing to give you.

There is another very useful Mac audio app called Audio Hijack Pro by Rogue Amoeba. I don't know if it is quite what you need, but it does enable you to record any and all audio that plays on your Mac. It is shareware, but there is a cut down freeware version, and some other nifty audio utilities on their site. Check them out.

--------------------
"Knowledge is Power. France is Bacon" - Milton

Posts: 2922 | From: Brighton - UK | Registered: Mar 2003  |  IP: Logged
Alan!
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Icon 1 posted November 29, 2004 08:45      Profile for Alan!     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
good find Calli.

perhaps you can tell me if this works, as it is shown on my splash screen, and i remember the paradoxical irony of using 'yeh two' for a studio app:

yeh two
93100118

--------------------
Alan!

Two rabbis, a priest, and an awkward silence after there's no intelligible punch line to this joke, walk into a bar.

Posts: 219 | From: Perth, Western Australia | Registered: Apr 2002  |  IP: Logged
apilar
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Icon 7 posted November 29, 2004 12:49      Profile for apilar         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Thanks for the input so far.

I've been producing radio segments for my local public radio station on their equipment but want to do this from the road and email them a sound file.

So I've been getting advice from people on what to get and just started purchasing software and hardware while I had the funds. But where I live, nobody who is doing radio owns a Mac and uses an audio editing program. The closest is someone who edits audio using Final Cut but for now, that is overkill for me.

Posts: 2 | From: wyoming | Registered: Nov 2004  |  IP: Logged
TheMoMan
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Icon 1 posted November 29, 2004 18:02      Profile for TheMoMan         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
apilar ___ I have been left out of the loop on audio, the last top notch equipment I had was all anolog and fed 1/4 inch tape at 60 inches/sec. I have not joined the digital age as I feel that the specs for even audio CD's throws away too much of the original signal, while there are some very good mixers in the digital field, the presence of the music has been lost, OH well just the musings of an old audiophile.

--------------------
Those who would give up essential liberty to purchase a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety.


Benjamin Franklin,

Posts: 5855 | From: Just South of the Huron National Forest, in the water shed of the Rifle River | Registered: Sep 2002  |  IP: Logged
GMx

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Icon 4 posted November 30, 2004 11:25      Profile for GMx     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Open source Audacity should be enough for you.
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TheMoMan
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Icon 1 posted November 30, 2004 17:22      Profile for TheMoMan         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
GMx___I am unsure as to whom the reference is for apilar or my self. I do not like any form of digital music because too much has been thrown away to get it onto the medium.

--------------------
Those who would give up essential liberty to purchase a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety.


Benjamin Franklin,

Posts: 5855 | From: Just South of the Huron National Forest, in the water shed of the Rifle River | Registered: Sep 2002  |  IP: Logged
csk

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Icon 1 posted November 30, 2004 17:35      Profile for csk     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by TheMoMan:
GMx___I am unsure as to whom the reference is for apilar or my self. I do not like any form of digital music because too much has been thrown away to get it onto the medium.

Have you checked out the SACD and DVD-A formats? How do they compare in your eyes?

In any case, I'm a little skeptical about dismissing something purely on spec. Sure, if you can hear the difference in a double blind test, then that's another thing. But I'd guess most non golden ears would have no chance of picking the difference between a good LP setup and a good CD setup.

--------------------
6 weeks to go!

Posts: 4455 | From: Sydney, Australia | Registered: Jan 2003  |  IP: Logged
TheMoMan
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Icon 1 posted December 01, 2004 03:53      Profile for TheMoMan         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
OK here are my reasons, four years in concert, forty years as a short wave listener and ham radio operater. A well practised ear can detect changes in notes that exceed 200khz the best CD is limited to 22.5khz one tenth of some audiophiles and much less than many others, I can tell if tubes or transisters are used in the ampifier. by the time audio has been compressed down small enough to use in a mp3 player there is nothing left. CD's are all right in cars because of the large amount of background noise but become apparent even on cheap boom boxes. Try this experiment while sitting at your computer, Can you hear the cooling fan, the flyback transformer in the moniter and your hard drive moveing page in/out for virtual memory? These sounds tell me that I can still hear.

--------------------
Those who would give up essential liberty to purchase a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety.


Benjamin Franklin,

Posts: 5855 | From: Just South of the Huron National Forest, in the water shed of the Rifle River | Registered: Sep 2002  |  IP: Logged
The Famous Druid

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Icon 1 posted December 02, 2004 00:14      Profile for The Famous Druid     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by TheMoMan:
OK here are my reasons, four years in concert, forty years as a short wave listener and ham radio operater. A well practised ear can detect changes in notes that exceed 200khz the best CD is limited to 22.5khz

And yet, most people of my age (mid 40s) are lucky if they can hear even 20kHz.

I used to have very good high range hearing, when I was at university, I could hear bat sonar from the nearby colony, (50-100 kHz) something my zoologist friends assured me was impossible, until I demonstrated it for them in a blindfold experiment. I've also had to refuse to use certain computer monitors, because the high pitched squeal only I could hear was annoying the fsck out of me.

Not any more.

Old age is a bitch.

--------------------
If you watch 'The History Of NASA' backwards, it's about a space agency that has no manned spaceflight capability, then does low-orbit flights, then lands on the Moon.

Posts: 10702 | From: Melbourne, Australia | Registered: Oct 2002  |  IP: Logged
Flashfire
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Icon 1 posted December 03, 2004 13:01      Profile for Flashfire   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by The Famous Druid:
quote:
Originally posted by TheMoMan:
OK here are my reasons, four years in concert, forty years as a short wave listener and ham radio operater. A well practised ear can detect changes in notes that exceed 200khz the best CD is limited to 22.5khz

And yet, most people of my age (mid 40s) are lucky if they can hear even 20kHz.

I used to have very good high range hearing, when I was at university, I could hear bat sonar from the nearby colony, (50-100 kHz) something my zoologist friends assured me was impossible, until I demonstrated it for them in a blindfold experiment. I've also had to refuse to use certain computer monitors, because the high pitched squeal only I could hear was annoying the fsck out of me.

Not any more.

Old age is a bitch.

I dunno, I would consider it a definite blessing not to have to hear those horrible noises from CRTs anymore.

--------------------
"No silicon heaven? That's absurd!
Where would all the calculators go?"
--Kryten, Red Dwarf
-------------------------------
My Web Comic: NSTA: Semper Vigilantis

Posts: 368 | From: State of Denial | Registered: Mar 2004  |  IP: Logged
drunkennewfiemidget
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Icon 1 posted December 03, 2004 18:21      Profile for drunkennewfiemidget     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by The Famous Druid:
quote:
Originally posted by TheMoMan:
OK here are my reasons, four years in concert, forty years as a short wave listener and ham radio operater. A well practised ear can detect changes in notes that exceed 200khz the best CD is limited to 22.5khz

And yet, most people of my age (mid 40s) are lucky if they can hear even 20kHz.

I used to have very good high range hearing, when I was at university, I could hear bat sonar from the nearby colony, (50-100 kHz) something my zoologist friends assured me was impossible, until I demonstrated it for them in a blindfold experiment. I've also had to refuse to use certain computer monitors, because the high pitched squeal only I could hear was annoying the fsck out of me.

Not any more.

Old age is a bitch.

I can still hear stupidly high pitched things -- it drives me nuts. It feels like it's cutting through me. Terrible feeling.

Surprising, since one of my main hobbies is installing large car stereos and I'm quite the concert whore.. (been to at least a few hundred in my short life)

I'm sure it will fade with age -- I'm still a youngin'.

Posts: 4897 | From: Cambridge, ON, Canada | Registered: Jun 2004  |  IP: Logged
TheMoMan
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Icon 1 posted December 03, 2004 18:31      Profile for TheMoMan         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
DNM_____I am suprised that I can still hear as well as I do, First that nasty little war in French Indochina, serving on flight decks of aircraft carriers. Thirty years in the belly of American Auto Industry, maintaining the big presses, they have there own unique sounds, a form of rolling thunder, and of course Motorcycles, with out baffles in the mufflers, and I can still hear.

--------------------
Those who would give up essential liberty to purchase a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety.


Benjamin Franklin,

Posts: 5855 | From: Just South of the Huron National Forest, in the water shed of the Rifle River | Registered: Sep 2002  |  IP: Logged
drunkennewfiemidget
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Icon 1 posted December 04, 2004 05:18      Profile for drunkennewfiemidget     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Yea, i've heard the big presses at an auto plant -- my father works at the Toyota plant in Cambridge, ON, and a few years back, we were allowed to tour it. I can't even imagine working around those things for a long period of time.. they even shake the floor around them.
Posts: 4897 | From: Cambridge, ON, Canada | Registered: Jun 2004  |  IP: Logged
The Famous Druid

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Icon 1 posted December 04, 2004 15:25      Profile for The Famous Druid     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Many moons ago I worked at a local GM plant.

The foreman and some of the long-tme workers were quite fluent in Auslan (the aussie version of sign language for the deaf) even though they were not hearing impaired. They could carry on a conversation at 20 metres distance in a factory that was so noisy that spoken communications were damn near impossible.

I learned a few of the basic signs, but wasn't there for long enough to progress far.

--------------------
If you watch 'The History Of NASA' backwards, it's about a space agency that has no manned spaceflight capability, then does low-orbit flights, then lands on the Moon.

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drunkennewfiemidget
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Icon 1 posted December 04, 2004 17:30      Profile for drunkennewfiemidget     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by The Famous Druid:
Many moons ago I worked at a local GM plant.

The foreman and some of the long-tme workers were quite fluent in Auslan (the aussie version of sign language for the deaf) even though they were not hearing impaired. They could carry on a conversation at 20 metres distance in a factory that was so noisy that spoken communications were damn near impossible.

I learned a few of the basic signs, but wasn't there for long enough to progress far.

I can only think of one hand gesture that would normally be necessary in a factory-type place of work. [Wink]
Posts: 4897 | From: Cambridge, ON, Canada | Registered: Jun 2004  |  IP: Logged


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