homeGeek CultureWebstoreeCards!Forums!Joy of Tech!AY2K!webcam

The Geek Culture Forums


Post New Topic  New Poll  Post A Reply
my profile | directory login | | search | faq | forum home
  next oldest topic   next newest topic
» The Geek Culture Forums   » News, Reviews, Views!   » Our stupid lives   » He likes the interface

 - UBBFriend: Email this page to someone!    
Author Topic: He likes the interface
GrumpySteen

Solid Nitrozanium SuperFan
Member # 170

Icon 1 posted April 13, 2010 09:48      Profile for GrumpySteen     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Me: The last version of our software that supported Windows NT was 4.81 which was released 7 years ago.

Me: Is there a reason they can't upgrade the server from NT to a something that's less than 10 years old?

Other support guy: customer's manager doesn't like the new interface...

Other support guy: and wants to keep old server...

--------------------
Worst. Celibate. Ever.

Posts: 6364 | From: Tennessee | Registered: Jan 2000  |  IP: Logged
Stereo

Solid Nitrozanium SuperFan!
Member # 748

Member Rated:
5
Icon 1 posted April 13, 2010 10:39      Profile for Stereo     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Goes to tell the importance of good interface design. [Wink]

I could rant for days about how many programmers often only think about what they think is good instead of the job the users will do with the software. Hitting a button below an exanded text zone? Windows that grow, rather than having the scrollbar show at the right place? A software I won't name does just that. Visual Basic is good for prototyping, but just because it allows you to do something doesn't mean it is acceptable! [Mad]

--------------------
Eppur, si muove!

Galileo Galilei

Posts: 2289 | From: Gatineau, Quebec, Canada | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
Aditu
SuperBlabberMouth!
Member # 2340

Member Rated:
5
Icon 1 posted April 13, 2010 13:28      Profile for Aditu     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I once bought a book for our library on writing good user documentation, which never got checked out. [Smile]
Posts: 1355 | From: Osten Ard | Registered: Aug 2003  |  IP: Logged
GrumpySteen

Solid Nitrozanium SuperFan
Member # 170

Icon 1 posted April 13, 2010 14:48      Profile for GrumpySteen     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Stereo wrote:
Goes to tell the importance of good interface design. [Wink]

No... not really. It does show the tendency of some people to stick with what they know and refuse change. I wouldn't be surprised to find out that the guy goes home to run his treasured copy of Microsoft Bob in the evenings. [Smile]

--------------------
Worst. Celibate. Ever.

Posts: 6364 | From: Tennessee | Registered: Jan 2000  |  IP: Logged
dragonman97

SuperFan!
Member # 780

Member Rated:
4
Icon 1 posted April 13, 2010 18:17      Profile for dragonman97   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Enough time has gone by that my boss no longer pines for NT, but he's only recently stopped complaining about how things were in 2000. Suffice it to say, he's not terribly impressed by Windows 7. [Wink]

(That being said, we're taking a serious look at it, as XP has to be replaced at /some/ point.)

While I'm not always fond of changing the way I do things, I do have a recognition of the fact that things change, and you have to adapt. Ergo, I do...lest I far too rusty.

--------------------
There are three things you can be sure of in life: Death, taxes, and reading about fake illnesses online...

Posts: 9332 | From: Westchester County, New York | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Stereo

Solid Nitrozanium SuperFan!
Member # 748

Member Rated:
5
Icon 1 posted April 14, 2010 09:05      Profile for Stereo     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by GrumpySteen:
Stereo wrote:
Goes to tell the importance of good interface design. [Wink]

No... not really. It does show the tendency of some people to stick with what they know and refuse change.

If the new interface was easier, faster, and resulted in less errors from being clearer and more fool-proof, do you think the guy would be against it? [Wink]

Of course, I know nothing about the actual product's interface, old or new. And yes, there are people who will refuse to give up old, bad ways because they are not sure they can learn anymore, or are afraid the newer, more efficient way will make them uneeded - or worse: will expose their incompetencies... Yet "secretaries" became "administrative assistants", but didn't disappear from the introduction of the computer.

So, what do I know, really? Except that some programmers know nothing about good interface design, and thus cause unecessary grief to their customers. And that being a pet peeve of mine, I kinda piggy-backed it on your own rant. Let it just be a reminder to the GC crowd! [Big Grin]

--------------------
Eppur, si muove!

Galileo Galilei

Posts: 2289 | From: Gatineau, Quebec, Canada | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
CommanderShroom
BlabberMouth, a Blabber Odyssey
Member # 2097

Member Rated:
4
Icon 1 posted April 14, 2010 09:14      Profile for CommanderShroom     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Stereo:
quote:
Originally posted by GrumpySteen:

No... not really. It does show the tendency of some people to stick with what they know and refuse change.

If the new interface was easier, faster, and resulted in less errors from being clearer and more fool-proof, do you think the guy would be against it? [Wink]
Think of it this way.

If a true Unix terminal would do your job as easy, if not easier, how willing would you be to ditch your Mac?

I am not saying it is, but we all get used to certain things. And people are creatures of habit. So by extension, they tend to "Stick with what they know." This has good and bad aspects. In terms of old-world craftsman, it keeps things alive for future generations. However this also means that in some cases that they refuse to consider change, not because it is less useful, instead out of fear.

Posts: 2465 | From: Utarrrrggggghhh!!!!!!!! | Registered: Mar 2003  |  IP: Logged
dragonman97

SuperFan!
Member # 780

Member Rated:
4
Icon 1 posted April 14, 2010 22:04      Profile for dragonman97   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by CommanderShroom:
Think of it this way.

If a true Unix terminal would do your job as easy, if not easier, how willing would you be to ditch your Mac?
...

Nice one.

True case: I use vim/gVim for lots of things.

I *guarantee* that it's faster than any common alternative available on Windows+Office for a lot of useful operations. It has a huge learning curve for some of these things, and as such, I'm not about to convert many folks to it from /much slower/ [and error-prone] processes.

I've trained my 'next in line' to do some of these things in gVim...but I'm sure that if I haven't outlined a process, it's going to be done in a 'regular' fashion.

Alternatively, if there was something out there that did things in a more 'GUI-friendly' manner (like Notepad++) that folks preferred to employ to work efficiently, I'd love someone to take charge with that and 'show me wrong.' Alas, as Shroom said 'they tend to "Stick with what they know."' Ergo, no advances will be made if left to their own devices. (Instead, I tend to drag people kicking and screaming into the future. [Usually with friendlier tools than vim...])

Edit:
Oh...you said "as easy." Whoops. [Razz]
(It's easy to me...does that count? I wield more power with my right pinky in gVim than exists in 70% of Notepad.)

--------------------
There are three things you can be sure of in life: Death, taxes, and reading about fake illnesses online...

Posts: 9332 | From: Westchester County, New York | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
CommanderShroom
BlabberMouth, a Blabber Odyssey
Member # 2097

Member Rated:
4
Icon 1 posted April 15, 2010 09:09      Profile for CommanderShroom     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I think it does to a certain degree.

IIRC Stereo's real job is doing some type of Web testing software work. So in that case going pure command line is probably not what would be considered the most efficient tool out there. One of those where depending on the job, there are certain 'givens' to how the job should be accomplished.

So in her case I thought it was the best way to describe that mental lock in.

--------------------
Does he know our big secret?
Has one of us confessed?
'Bout the wires circuits and motors
Buried in our chest

Posts: 2465 | From: Utarrrrggggghhh!!!!!!!! | Registered: Mar 2003  |  IP: Logged
Stereo

Solid Nitrozanium SuperFan!
Member # 748

Member Rated:
5
Icon 12 posted April 15, 2010 10:33      Profile for Stereo     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Well, I do e-learning course development, with some web scripting and programming.

I gave the example of that tool I use where the interface is so ugly that I would change for a better one anytime. But I use it because it's still faster than coding each pages individually.

On the other hand, even though just about everyone uses .Net, I don't. I still code ASP (old version) with notepad, because although I have tried installing the development tool, it was a pain to try to access pages created by someone else; some would just not open from some permission/creation (and perhaps configuration) setting, yet I had to correct a bug left by the other (no longer working here) programmer. So that was a case where the new thing was too much complex; it made my job harder, not easier. With Notepad-created ASP, I know if I have an accident and someone else needs to change my code, they will be able to do it.

But at a previous assignment, I had to redesign a tool used by not-so-techy people. The other teams member left me a lot of latitude, so the interface was developped from the ground up in collaboration with the final user. The users were happy to have a more stable, more robust, and more efficient tool. Because the interface was tailored to their needs, their process flow; not the programmer's. Comments of my supervisor: doing so actually made the programming easier, because it made very clear what was supposed to do what, and how the different parts integrated.

Having used and built good interfaces, and having used (hopefully, never built!) bad ones, I know how a good interface developer can make a world of difference.

As far as command line go; if the different commands and options were all easily memorable, so that it doesn't take months to learn them all; if the slightest typo didn't break them (I like auto-completion features!), I would use them a lot. But since I prefer to play games with a graphical interface, I am not likely to give up my Mac (which does command line too, and I even have used it a couple of times; nothing is so easy to test a network connection than to ping the server address) any time soon! [Big Grin]

--------------------
Eppur, si muove!

Galileo Galilei

Posts: 2289 | From: Gatineau, Quebec, Canada | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged


All times are Eastern Time  
Post New Topic  New Poll  Post A Reply Close Topic    Move Topic    Delete Topic next oldest topic   next newest topic
 - Printer-friendly view of this topic
Hop To:

Contact Us | Geek Culture Home Page

© 2015 Geek Culture

Powered by Infopop Corporation
UBB.classicTM 6.4.0



homeGeek CultureWebstoreeCards!Forums!Joy of Tech!AY2K!webcam