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Author Topic: why oh why does this *ALWAYS* happen?
freebsd_dude
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Icon 5 posted December 08, 2001 11:18      Profile for freebsd_dude     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
ok, i'm a good little geek, i learn from my mistakes. i know that unless you want to shoot yourelf in foot 6 months from now, when your installing a unix type OS you make your /home directory on a seperate parition.

my question is, why is that no matter how big i make that partition, it's always full? full of useful stuff. not crap that i can just delete.

is there an unwritten law that no matter how big your hard drive is, that it will always get full?

nathan


Posts: 25 | From: WV,USA | Registered: Nov 2001  |  IP: Logged
annie
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Icon 1 posted December 08, 2001 16:11      Profile for annie     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
quote:
Originally posted by freebsd_dude:
ok, i'm a good little geek, i learn from my mistakes. i know that unless you want to shoot yourelf in foot 6 months from now, when your installing a unix type OS you make your /home directory on a seperate parition.

my question is, why is that no matter how big i make that partition, it's always full? full of useful stuff. not crap that i can just delete.

is there an unwritten law that no matter how big your hard drive is, that it will always get full?

nathan


Yes. It's kind of like my parents and their CD racks. My parents keep on buying bigger racks, but they keep on getting full. And with good music too, not just stuff they can throw out.

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the world will have to end someday; hopefully not while i'm around.


Posts: 391 | From: somewhere in Canada | Registered: Sep 2001  |  IP: Logged
theJacob
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Icon 2 posted December 08, 2001 17:44      Profile for theJacob     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
My first computer had 79 megabites or so. We thought it would take forever to fill with 500k applications. Then the software companies came out with all these 19 meg applications. The HD filled up.
When we got our Mac, we had 1.1 gigs at our disposal. We thought it would take forever to fill with 19 meg appliactions. Then the software companies came out with all these 100meg applications. The HD filled up.
When we got a second hard drive, it had several gigs. We thought it would take forever to fill with 100 meg applications. Then the 900meg-1gig applications came out. The HD filled up.
When I got my palm, it had 2 mb. I thought it would take forever to fill with 30k applications. Then the software companies came out with all these 500k applications, and the cycle continues...

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Posts: 141 | From: Colorado | Registered: Nov 2001  |  IP: Logged
MrJ
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Icon 1 posted December 09, 2001 01:39      Profile for MrJ     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
I like single big partitions which include /home. I have never shot myself in the foot, and I don't really see how that's possible anymore anyway. I fill all my hard drives up eventually but it's taking me a long time to fill up my latest 75 GB. I'm not even close, but I leave GB temporary files around just because I can now. That feels good. My best friend on the other hand just bought a 120 GB. He's always complaining about space problems.
Posts: 35 | From: near Grand Rapids, MI | Registered: Mar 2001  |  IP: Logged
-ct-
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Icon 4 posted December 09, 2001 07:43      Profile for -ct-   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
i know *exactly* what you mean!

i only have 187GB of storage in my PC right now and it's not enough

i ws up to 3am last night burning stuff to make more room
stuff that i'll have to uncompress and burn again if i want to actually USE it
i mananged to free up only 15GB :


Posts: 1906 | From: nowhere, man | Registered: Jan 2000  |  IP: Logged
HD Whiz
Discontinued


Icon 12 posted December 09, 2001 08:08            Edit/Delete Post 
Ditch the porn.
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Akira
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Icon 1 posted December 09, 2001 12:51      Profile for Akira   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
With me it's MP3s that take up most of the space. A coworker of mine just nabbed a 40 gig FireWire drive and dumped all his MP3s from his machine at work *and* his machine at home onto it. Now not only has he freed up significant gigabytage at each location, he can also transport his entire music collection back and forth. Sort of an iPod on steroids.

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Posts: 223 | From: LA LA land | Registered: Oct 2001  |  IP: Logged
supaboy
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Icon 1 posted December 10, 2001 07:50      Profile for supaboy     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
quote:
Originally posted by freebsd_dude:
i know that unless you want to shoot yourelf in foot 6 months from now, when your installing a unix type OS you make your /home directory on a seperate parition.

Every time I've installed a Unix-like OS it's wanted to mount /home on a separate partition. Since most of the machines have had only one hard drive and I'm the only user on any of 'em, I haven't been able to think of why this would be beneficial. So what I do is just go with a / and a swap partition. On the off chance I add a hard drive to one of these machines, I will put /home on it and the space previously taken by /home would be available to the other directories in /.

In other words, if I had a computer with multiple drives installed, I would see / more as a place to collect mount points, but not so much with a single-user, single-drive system.

If any Unix admins can offer some compelling advice about that, I'll definitely remember the next time I set a machine up!


Posts: 1767 | From: Columbia, SC USA | Registered: Jan 2000  |  IP: Logged
greycat

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Icon 1 posted December 11, 2001 10:56      Profile for greycat   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
quote:
is there an unwritten law that no matter how big your hard drive is, that it will always get full?

It's already been written.

code:

$ /usr/games/fortune -m "steady state"
(computers)
%
The steady state of disks is full.
-- Ken Thompson

There are a couple reasons why you might want a separate /home partition even on a single-user Unix box:

  • If you accidentally extract a tarball that's a lot bigger than you thought, filling up /home, you don't prevent non-root daemons from logging to /var/log, etc.
  • If you want to upgrade or migrate to a different Unix system (or different Linux distribution) that requires a reinstallation, you can leave your /home untouched, so long as the file system type is supported.
  • If your boot loader has restrictions on the file system type that you can use for the file system where your kernel resides (typically /boot or /stand or /), /home can still be a more "advanced" type of file system.

Posts: 1522 | From: Ohio, USA | Registered: Oct 2001  |  IP: Logged


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