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Author Topic: All cat owners should know this
huon
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Icon 1 posted July 19, 2005 19:06      Profile for huon     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Looks like this topic is now finished, but just wanted to add something as it was the death of my cat which prompted the original article.
It was good more people became aware of this problem with Lilies and also about the many other poisons that can affect their pets.
Doco in particular raised some interesting points and I would just like to point out that my cat was an indoor cat (we live in an apartment.) Lilies do usually affect indoor cats, because an outdoor cat would not be so interested in plants, being quite used to them, whilst an indoor cat will be fascinated by the bunch of exotic flowers which has come into the house. Also if Lily pollen does fall onto an outdoor cat, most will be dislodged as the cat runs about, whilst an indoor cat will fastidiously clean the pollen from it's fur and thus ingest the fatal dose.
I also took on board Doco's comments on warning labels and agree that with too many warnings people stop reading them.
But after my experience with my own cat dying such a vile death I hope you will understand that I feel Lilies are so lethal there should be some warning. I don't want to go too deeply into it, but she quickly suffered renal (kidney) failure and one of the side effects was the retinas became detached from her eyes. It was really sad to see such a nice little cat suffer so horribly and be put to sleep when she had been so perky just a few days before. Lilies are particularly dangerous as it takes only half a leaf to kill a healthy adult cat and even though I kept the flowers out of reach of my cat (they were on a table) the pollen fell about 4 feet onto Catalinas coat. She cleaned it off and became sick. By the time we realised how sick she was, it was too late to go to the vet, so I nursed her all night and then went to the vet first thing in the morning, but although she had dialysis etc, nothing could be done and we had to end her suffering.
As a result of this I have asked several of our British supermarkets to display some warning and one (Sainsbury) has started to do so. It is a simple label pointing out that the pollen can cause stains on clothing and may be dangerous to cats. That is all it takes and I was very grateful to Sainsbury for doing that.

Posts: 4 | From: Folkestone England | Registered: Jul 2005  |  IP: Logged
Snaggy

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Icon 1 posted July 19, 2005 20:51      Profile for Snaggy   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Welcome huon. So sorry to hear of your cat's death, that is very sad. [Frown]

It's great you've been working on educating and warning others about this danger. No doubt you are saving people and pets from a similar heartbreak.

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huon
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Icon 1 posted July 19, 2005 21:14      Profile for huon     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Snaggy, thanks very much for the welcome and also the sympathy.
To be honest raising awareness on this issue has been good therapy for me. I was so angry when my cat died in this way that I could have gone to the supermarkets head office and done something silly. But I just kept Emailing people and telling people about it and eventually calmed down.
It was a great example though of how the net can help one to campaign on an issue. First I was able to learn a lot about Lily poisoning in cats (mostly from U.S. university websites) and then I spoke to a lot of people. I also got an article in the local paper, which was picked up by a national agency (Ferrari) who got large (half page) articles in three of our national papers. There was also an interview for BBC Radio, various magazine articles and even a discussion on daytime T.V., so lots of people heard about it and I have had post not only from people in Britain, but also the Irish Republic.
Things like the recent bombings here in London put it into perspective. I do know I am just a silly old person with his cat, but if I had known about this then my cat would still be alive, so I do feel justified in making other people aware and hopefully averting some of the sadness.

Posts: 4 | From: Folkestone England | Registered: Jul 2005  |  IP: Logged
ooby
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Icon 1 posted July 20, 2005 05:39      Profile for ooby     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by drunkennewfiemidget:
They say when a dog munches grass, it's because they have a tummy ache or upset stomach. I don't know if that's a wive's tale or not.

I don't know either but my gf's dumb doberman is bolemic. She'll eat a bunch of non-foods (tennis balls, blankets, pantyhose) and then she'll usually graze to vomet them back up. If she doesn't graze, she'll pass just about anything.

Also, my gf is taking her cat to get FeLV shots even though he's strictly an indoor cat. She's a vet tech and worries that she could carry home the virus on her scrubs.

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"haven't you ever wondered if there's more to life than being really, really, rediculously good looking?"

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huon
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Icon 1 posted July 21, 2005 05:00      Profile for huon     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Ooby, sounds like the dog has a stomach complaint, but I am sure your gf is onto it.
These things may seem funny, but are usually a sign of a developing complaint.
For instance if a cat starts drinking lots of water, this is a sign of kidney trouble. At this stage a change of diet and a few pills can extend the cats life for several years, but if nothing is done the cat will suddenly develop renal failure and die.

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ooby
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Icon 1 posted July 21, 2005 05:23      Profile for ooby     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
For starters, she's incontinent and on proin.

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Matias
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Icon 11 posted July 28, 2005 21:51      Profile for Matias   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
I'm moderately sure flowers are what killed one of my ex-gf's cats. Her cat got horribly sick one Christmas after being near the flowers. Her liver shut down.
If i'm not mistaken the flower Poinsettia was never allowed in my house growing up because of this. My mother was correct i see....it's sad she had to learn this way.

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Posts: 516 | From: The Land of the mouse.... | Registered: Jul 2005  |  IP: Logged
huon
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Icon 1 posted July 29, 2005 12:19      Profile for huon     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Yes there are a lot of plants that are dangerous for cats, but Lilies seem to be causing more problems than others.
We don't have a garden but all my window boxes have cat friendly plants now. Begonia, violets, Jasmine, daisies, Orchids. All of those seem OK.

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Matias
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Icon 1 posted July 30, 2005 11:18      Profile for Matias   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by drunkennewfiemidget:
They say when a dog munches grass, it's because they have a tummy ache or upset stomach. I don't know if that's a wive's tale or not.

I have a Rottweiler and a Chow/Husky/Retriever mix and both eat grass outside when they are not feeling well...about 10-15 minutes later they spit up what was bothering their stomach, while the rest will "pass" through later on. I have never stopped them from doing this because after this is done, they feel better. So it is normal for a dog to eat grass and from what I understand cats use it for the same purpose but you have to be careful with they type of grass they nibble on.

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A positive attitude may not solve all your problems, but it will annoy enough people to make it worth the effort.

Posts: 516 | From: The Land of the mouse.... | Registered: Jul 2005  |  IP: Logged
Masserianova
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Icon 1 posted August 10, 2005 14:47      Profile for Masserianova   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
wow, good news for cat haters.
Posts: 2 | From: Denmark | Registered: Aug 2005  |  IP: Logged


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