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Author Topic: inteligent thought process
Jace Raven

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Icon 1 posted January 14, 2004 12:33      Profile for Jace Raven         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
As we should all know, intelligence does not necessarily mean that a person will be successful. It does however increase their chances. With that in mind, do you think that society should require a test that measures, not intelligence or IQ, but aptitude as a requirement for job placement. An example of this would be the ASVAB that the military requires all of its recruits to take and pass with a certain score. Of course a higher score will give you more ‘choices.’
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The Famous Druid

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Icon 1 posted January 14, 2004 12:43      Profile for The Famous Druid     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
What is intelligence?

We tend to define it in terms of mathematical ability and ability to solve those little shape-puzzles you get in IQ tests, but is that the only sensible measure?

How is it that people who routinely score in the top percentile of IQ tests can be completely baffled by a box full of IKEA bits?

Why are so many 'intelligent' geeks completely incapable of choosing clothes that go well together, or picking up on the ten-tonne hints their friends are trying to give them on some social issue? Surely those skills are signs of 'intelligence'.

Why can I read and appreciate good poetry, but the stuff I try to write just sucks?

Real people have a range of abilities, good at some, poor at others, how 'intelligent' they are depends on which skills you choose to assess. I know one member of my household would define intelligence as the ability to catch a frisbee in ones mouth, or sniff out a half-eaten sandwich from a bin. It's all a matter of priorities.

p.s. I quite agree with Skylar, let's give the spelling nazi thing a rest, it's getting tiresome.

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If you watch 'The History Of NASA' backwards, it's about a space agency that has no manned spaceflight capability, then does low-orbit flights, then lands on the Moon.

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d3m057h3n35
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Icon 1 posted January 14, 2004 13:28      Profile for d3m057h3n35     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
What an interesting thread. What "separates" "intelligent" people from others?

I consider myself fairly intelligent (near the top of my class, perfect SATs) and also I think I've got above average artistic ability. Do I feel my thought processes are special, unique or anything like that? Not particularly. My creativity and memory shuts on and off randomly like most everyone else's, and I am more than capable of making mistakes (speeling muhsteaks noht exsseptuhd uhf korse, tho i em a natzi ihn thaht ahrya nunthules). I don't know if the question of comparing thought processes is all that relevant either, since it is so subjective.

The work habits question is easier to analyze, because it can be documented. My take on it: intelligent people are certainly not always productive. My work habits:

Strict deadline worker. Results in a lot of stress.
Moderately efficient.
Once I got used to a method, it's tough for me to change.
Hate working on boring stuff. This is a problem.
Very easily distracted.
Good planning skills (this is one of my few assets).

I wonder how well I judge my own works habits, anyway. Would people benefit if experts gave them advise on how to work more productively and "intelligently?" Even better, how to make the two go hand in hand, which is so hard.

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csk

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Icon 1 posted January 14, 2004 16:08      Profile for csk     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I'm a similar temperament to you, d3m057h3n35, at least in terms of work. I find it hard to motivate myself to do some things, but I'm good at the things I do get done.

It's partly also personality type, that Myers-Brigg stuff we did on here a little while ago. Different types behave differently, but put a mix of types together and you have synergy (yes, I know it's a buzzword, but it's a good buzzword). "Seven Habits of Highly Effective People" is also an interesting read on this subject.

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Callipygous
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Icon 1 posted January 14, 2004 16:13      Profile for Callipygous     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I think intelligence is almost impossible to define accurately, and people using the word are too often snobbish or demeaning about those they consider less intelligent. I prefer to think in terms of talents, whether they be for an academic discipline, or something artistic, or sporting, or dealing with people, etc., etc.

While I like Sky's sentiments I cannot agree wholeheartedly. First bad spelling is distracting, and secondly those who spell badly, also seldom read their posts to see if they are actually saying anything coherent. I don't need to see fantastic rococo flourishes in every post, but I admire anyone who can say something simply clearly and concisely.

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Xanthine

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Icon 1 posted January 14, 2004 16:36      Profile for Xanthine     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Is this going to be a comparison between thinking patterns? What's your hypothesis here? How are you even going to study this? asking someone how they think is a quagmire. I don't really know how my mind works - it just does. Sometimes I reason through things logically. Other times it starts with logic and turns onto some sort of inuitive leap based off a shred of evidence and a barely-remebered fact/observation. You might be better off asking an independent observer, say, the genius's s.o. or teacher, or something, but even that will be a hit and miss. My parents and teachers would give gold to understand how I think.

Also, once again, how are you defining intelligence? There are some people out there who are really smart but completely lacking in diligence and drive. Others are the opposite. Inborn talent is a strange bird in that regard - it's great to have, but if you don't use it, you might as well not have it. And if you don't have it, you can compensate with very hard work, to a point. Believe me. I've been there and done that.

Abilities also vary. Some people are incredibly good at some things, but incredibly bad at others. I know my own test results from way back when were skewy. How skewy I can't say, because I've never seen them. This is just what my parents tell me. I don't know my raw score either.

I'm not sure there's any set thinking pattern for smart people. There are thinking patterns used by different disciplines - I do not think like a literary critic, nor do I think like an engineer.

As far as my work habits go, it seems to be something like this:
- get my lazy ass out of bed (the crux of every day)
- decide what I want to do
- figure out how to do it
- do it
- fail miserably
- bang head on wall
- clean up and figure out what happened
- try again
- either repeat the previous four steps OR
- do a little victory dance, clean up and go home
I also have a tendency to do exactly what I think needs doing, and not much more. This has earned me both criticism and praise, since what I think needs to be done isn't always in agreement with what my supervisor wants/expects. I can handle pressure too - in fact, I do better when the stress is on. As often as not, that stress is self-inflicted, but it provides some extra motivation.
Effective? Who knows. But it's been working for me so far. [Smile]

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And it's one, two, three / On the wrong side of the lee / What were you meant for? / What were you meant for?
- The Decemberists

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d3m057h3n35
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Icon 1 posted January 14, 2004 18:28      Profile for d3m057h3n35     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Callipygous: First bad spelling is distracting, and secondly those who spell badly, also seldom read their posts to see if they are actually saying anything coherent. I don't need to see fantastic rococo flourishes in every post, but I admire anyone who can say something simply clearly and concisely.

Yoo are absolutly ryte, badd speling is kwyte distrakting!

But seriously, you put your finger on it, and you effectively articulated why some people have a problem with bad spelling, and why most people have a problem with florid language too.

And while I'm posting, here's how my mind works: I think, or otherwise I'm not!

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Cap'n Vic

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Icon 1 posted January 14, 2004 21:56      Profile for Cap'n Vic     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Callipygous:
......but I admire anyone who can say something simply clearly and concisely.

Me too, me too.

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(!) (T) = 8-D

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Orpheus
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Icon 1 posted January 14, 2004 21:58      Profile for Orpheus     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
well I was gonna reply to this yesterday but never could decide what to say. Sometimes when presented with a problem 2 or 3 possible solutions will spring to mind immediately, sometimes I can reason my way through the problem, and sometimes I just have to sit for a while and think about it or fiddle around not thinking about it before a solution comes to mind. I think that's probably about the same experience that anyone has. If its a more complex problem I may need to do more research and build up my mental picture of the problem before a solution is found. You might want to check out The Math Gene. There is a pretty interesting discription of his thought process when approaching a mathematical problem. It's quite an interesting book.

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Mister Boo

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Icon 1 posted January 15, 2004 05:36      Profile for Mister Boo     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Cap'n Vic:
quote:
Originally posted by Callipygous:
......but I admire anyone who can say something simply clearly and concisely.

Me too, me too.
No, No, No Cap'n!
ME TOO, ME TOO LOL!!!!!!! must always be in caps to reflect its majority usage on AOHell [Big Grin] [Wink]

EDIT: Here's a place for AIMGlish lovers to hang out- Elf Only Inn

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cheezi git
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Icon 1 posted January 16, 2004 01:52      Profile for cheezi git     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by dragonman97:
I can agree with you, sky, but I have my limits. Most intelligent people have a pretty good familiarity with the world of academia, where it is commonly expected that you will write things that are spelled correctly and that have some semblance of grammatical structure.

i disagree dman. i know many people who are very intelligent, yet have never gone near academia: because they wanted to do other things; because they were unable to afford a university education; because their culture frowned on academia; because they wanted to work instead. i think that you are confusing intelligence with education.

many people use their education to convince others that they are intelligent. this is just snobbish fascism.

i have previously been, from time to time, hard on bad spellers. i do it because it amuses me and because it is easy. however having read sky's post i have decided not to go for cheap laughs. after all, i want this forum to be inclusive, and if criticising people's spelling is intimidating, then count me out.

(by the way, i'd never criticise anyone's grammar - best blowjob ever was with a toothless granny in cairo).

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there were so many stains on the road. squashed miss mitten-shaped stains in the universe. squashed frog-shaped stains in the universe. squashed crows that tried to eat the squashed frog-shaped stains in the universe. squashed dogs...

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